subaudi

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin subaudī, the second-person singular present active imperative form of subaudiō (I understand”, “I supply a word), from sub (under) + audiō (I hear”, “I listen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

subaudi (imperative only)

  1. Mentally supply (something which has not been expressed); scilicet.
    the grass is always greener [subaudi on the other side of the fence] — other circumstances seem more desirable than one’s own, but in reality are often not
    • 1852, Theophylact [pseud.], “Marriage of Ecclesiastics” in Notes and Queries IV:cix, page 428
      That sole remaining sense is, “the bed (let it) be undefiled;” subaudite ἔστω in the verse is, “Let marriage be honourable in all” (men or things), “and the bed be undefiled; but (or for) whoremongers and adulterers God will judge.”
    • 1905, The Spectator XCIV, page 355
      The Czar…expressed his intention to go on fighting for the honour of Russia, “and the command of the waters of the Pacific Ocean, so urgently necessary for the consolidation of the peaceful prosperity not only of Russia, but of other Christian nations” (? subaudite Germany).

Synonyms[edit]

  • subaudite (used when directing more than one person)

Adverb[edit]

subaudi (not comparable)

  1. By or relying upon mental suppletion.
    • 1861, Isaac Taylor, The Spirit of the Hebrew Poetry, page 54
      We ought not to say that a scorn of popular favour betrays itself — as if subaudite — in these deliverances of a message from the Almighty; yet it is almost so.
    • 1907, Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan, page 5
      By the ‘watchers’ are intended subaudité the guardians of the composer.

Adjective[edit]

subaudi (not comparable)

  1. Mentally supplied.
    • 1908, Journal of Theological Studies IX, page 619
      His aim is to give to the ordinary English reader, who has a reasonable interest in ‘Literature and Life’ — to which in Scotland ‘Philosophy’ is a subaudite third term, always implied and quickly felt — an account of Stoicism.

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

subaudī

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of subaudiō