you can't take it with you

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English[edit]

Proverb[edit]

you can't take it with you

  1. It is not possible to take one's material wealth to whatever world may await one after death.
    • 1900, E. Phillips Oppenheim, A Millionaire of Yesterday, ch. 6:
      "The clause which—at my death—makes you sole owner of the whole concession. You see—the odds were scarcely even, were they? It wasn't likely anything would happen to you!" . . .
      "What's it matter to you now?" Trent said, with unintentional brutality. "You can't take it with you."
    • 1980 Jan. 14, "Business: The Great Sell-Off," Time:
      Dealers also quietly bought gold fillings from morticians, proving that you can't take it with you.
    • 2007 Aug. 3, Conrad de Aenlle, "All the right (and wrong) moves," New York Times (retrieved 11 July 2011):
      You can't take it with you, of course, but your intended heirs may not be able to take it with them, either, if you do not explicitly state through a will who is supposed to get what.