Anglo-Latin

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originated 1785–95 from Anglo- +‎ Latin.

Proper noun[edit]

Anglo-Latin

  1. Medieval Latin language as used in Britain, especially ecclesiastical and legal Latin.
  2. Term derived from the Anglo-Latin medieval language, such as hearse, herald and prong. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The period begins with the arrival of Augustine in Britain in 597 AD and is sometimes considered to end in 1066 AD, though writing in Latin in Britain continued to the fifteenth century and beyond.

Citations[edit]

  • 1899 (also 1907), Count Lützow, A History of Bohemian Literature (series: Short Histories of the Literatures of the World, edited by Edmund Gosse), p. 287:
    Anglo-Latin versions are numerous, the last having been published at Oxford in 1800.

References[edit]