Citations:Kiev

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English citations of Kiev, Kyiv, Kievan, and Kyivan

1952
1974
2000
2001
2007
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1952, Walla Walla Union-Bulletin, January 6, 1952.
    • The inconsistent Russian "thought police" are harassing Ukrainian writers. Recently the top men in literature and music were examined in Kyiv by a plenum of the leads of the Union of Soviet Composers of the Ukraine. "Idological perversions" were purged from their works.
  • 1974, “Second Ukrainian Week Promotes Culture and Fun”, Winnipeg Free Press, January 26, 1974.
    • Miss Kyiv (Kiev) will be crowned at the Independence Ball and will represent the Ukrainian community of Winnipeg at Folklorama 74.
  • 2000, “Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Closes: Site of 1986 Disaster”, in The National Post, December 16, 2000.
    • Nine years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Chernobyl's last functioning reactor was extinguished yesterday in a celebrity-studded ceremony that saw 2,000 specially invited guests crowd into Kyiv's glitzy concert hall, the Palace of Ukraine, to watch Leonid Kuchma, Ukraine's President, preside via television over the plant's final shutdown.
  • 2000, Fred Weir, “Kiev or Kyiv: Language an Issue in Ukraine”, in The Christian Science Monitor, June 28, 2000.
    • A stroll down the main street in the capital, Kyiv – the spelling the Ukrainian government prefers to the familiar, Russianized “Kiev” – seems to confirm his complaint.
    • "Language was never an issue in Ukraine," says Anatoly Grytsenko, director of the Center for Economic and Political Studies in Kyiv.
  • 2001, Richard Stone, “Nuclear Radiation: Dealing with a Slumbering Hulk”, in Science, April 20, 2001.
    • "The sarcophagus is unstable," says Viktor Baryakhtar, director of the Institute of Magnetism in Kyiv.
  • 2007, Serhy Yekelchyk, Ukraine: Birth of a Modern Nation. Oxford University Press.
    • 3: The events in Kyiv were one of the most televised revolutions in history.
    • 18: The ensuing unification of the Eastern Slavs under Varangian rule led to the creation of Kyivan Rus, a state from which the present-day Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia all trace their history of statehood.
    • 25: However, a revisionist Ukrainian scholar has argued recently that the Ruthenian princely and noble families continued functioning as a nationl elite until the early seventeenth century, thus ensuring the continuity of indigenous social and cultural structures between Kyivan times and the Cossack period.
    • 136: In September, the Panzer army of Heinz Guderian helped to encircle five Soviet armies around Kyiv.