Worthington's law

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a 1997 comedy sketch on Mr. Show with Bob and David.

Proper noun[edit]

Worthington's law

  1. (humorous, frequently capitalized) "More money = better than". One who has more money is of greater value than one who has less.
    • 1997 November 7, Bush is a Pussy (Mr. Show with Bob and David), season 3, episode 7:
      Carl Espick (David Cross): Did you know that according to Worthington's Law, the opera singer who called himself the "Great" Caruso was nowhere near as great as Sammy Hagar, the Red Rocker?
    • 2004 June 20, Milhouse Guidry, “Re: (OT) Much Ado About Michael Moore.”, in rec.sport.pro-wrestling, Usenet[1], message-ID <20040620105014.04657.00000255@mb-m10.aol.com>:
      You need to take into account Worthington's Law -- People who make more money than you are *better* than you, and are therefore above reproach.
    • 2014 April 10, Matt Reevy, “The 8 NFL Coaches Pulling in the Most Money Per Game”, in Wall St. Cheat Sheet[2], retrieved 2014-04-11:
      Even if they don’t win, at least Sean Payton knows he’s making more money than the rest of his contemporaries. Per Worthington’s law, that means he’s unassailable.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Worthington's law.

See also[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

A satirical law, typically cited ironically.