fager

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See also: Fager

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place). Cognate with Norwegian and Swedish fager, Icelandic fagur, English fair.

Adjective[edit]

fager

  1. fair (of good appearance), pretty

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place).

Adjective[edit]

fager

  1. fair (of good appearance), pretty

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place). Akin to English fair.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fager (neuter fagert, plural fagre, comparative fagrare, superlative fagrast)

  1. fair (of good appearance), pretty

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish fagher, from Old Norse fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place).

Adjective[edit]

fager (comparative fagerare, superlative fagerast)

  1. (dated) fair (of good appearance), pretty

Declension[edit]

Inflection of fager
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular fager fagrare fagrast
Neuter singular fagert fagrare fagrast
Plural fagra fagrare fagrast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 fagre fagrare fagraste
All fagra fagrare fagraste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related terms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂ḱ- (to fasten, place).

Adjective[edit]

fager (comparative fegär or fäger, supine fegst or fägst)

  1. fair (of good appearance), pretty

References[edit]

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “Fager”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 123