ræv

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See also: räv

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish ræf, from Old Norse refr, from Proto-Germanic *rebaz, cognate with Norwegian Nynorsk rev, Swedish räv. The word is probably borrowed from an Iranian source, compare Digor робас (robas, fox), Persian روباه(rōbāh), Sanskrit लोपाक (lopāka)).[1] Latin vulpēs and Ancient Greek ἀλώπηξ (alṓpēx) are probably related somehow, but it may be a wanderword.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ræv c (singular definite ræven, plural indefinite ræve)

  1. (zoology) fox (the species Vulpes vulpes)
  2. (figurative) fox (a sly person)

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) , “fuhsa”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 157-58

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Norwegian Nynorsk ræv or rauv, from Old Norse rauf (gap, rift, hole), Proto-Germanic *raubō (rift). Cognate with Danish røv and Swedish röv, used similarly. The noun is derived from the verb Old Norse rjúfa (to break, tear), Proto-Germanic *reufaną (to tear).

Noun[edit]

ræv f or m (definite singular ræva or ræven, indefinite plural ræver, definite plural rævene)

  1. (slang) arse, ass (buttocks)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse rauf, from Proto-Germanic *raubō. Doublet of rauv.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ræv f (definite singular ræva, indefinite plural ræver, definite plural rævene)

  1. (informal) arse
    Han fekk seg eit spark i ræva.
    He received a kick in the arse.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]