Appendix:Australian English terms for food and drink

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General vocabulary list[edit]

  • arse nuts or bum nuts - eggs
  • avos - avocados
  • baked dinner - usually a meal of roasted meat such as beef or lamb and vegetables
  • barbie – short form of barbecue (also written as BBQ); an outdoor meal of cooked chops and sausages (snags or bangers) and usually garnished with "dead horse" (tomato sauce) or sometimes BBQ sauce
  • bikkie - biscuit, also it cost big bikkies - it was expensive
  • billy - teapot, container for boiling water
  • billy - a deep, round tin used to make tea (or used more generally for cooking) over a campfire
  • brekky – short for breakfast
  • Breville - a toasted sandwich. Breville is the name of a company that makes sandwich toasters
  • bubble and squeak - a pan-fried dish made from leftovers, in particular roast meat and vegetables
  • cap - cappuccino coffee
  • chewie - chewing gum
  • chockie - chocolate
  • chook - chicken
  • counter lunch/countery - pub lunch
  • cuppa – a cup of tea or coffee
  • cut lunch - sandwiches
  • damper - bread made from flour and water
  • dead horse - tomato sauce
  • deli - regional name for a small shop open at times when other shops are closed and selling food, cigarettes and convenience items. From 'delicatessen' A deli does not necessarily sell fine foods, as would a delicatessen in other countries. Also known as a milk bar, corner shop.
  • dingo's breakfast - a yawn, a leak and a good look round (i.e. no breakfast)
  • dog's eye - meat pie
  • emu's eye - a method of frying an egg, using a slice of bread with the centre removed to contain the egg on a barbecue plate or frying pan
  • esky - large insulated food/drink container for picnics, barbecues etc. Short for Eskimo, the word is a registered trademark
  • fairy floss - candy floss, cotton candy
  • fizzy drink - used to describe any carbonated drink/soft drink (non-alcoholic)
  • flake - shark's flesh (sold in fish & chips shops). Also a chocolate bar (candy bar) with 'Flake' as its trademark name
  • icy pole – one of sveral regional generic names for a frozen flavoured water product; also known as an ice block, popsicle, ice stick, or by jingo. (Known as an ice lolly in some countries.). Another term, paddle pop, generally refers to a basic ice-cream on a wooden stick, due to a popular brand of the product bearing that name
  • jaffle - A toasted sandwich. Essentially the same as a 'Breville' but jaffles are toasted in an iron fire toaster rather than in an electric sandwich maker. Traditionally canned spaghetti or baked beans are used in a jaffle
  • jug - electric kettle
  • little boys - A tongue in cheek term for cocktail sausages. More correctly known as 'cocktail frankfurts'. Americans know them as 'cocktail wieners'
  • lolly (plural: lollies) – confectionery (cf. American candy, UK sweets).
  • lolly water - used to describe soft drink/soda and any alcoholic drink of low alcoholic content. Used as a term of derision, the second meaning is typically used by seasoned drinkers. Can also describe a drink which is too sweet
  • lunch bar - a small shop selling food items between 6 a.m. and 3 or 4 p.m., usually located in an industrial area for the convenience of workers.
  • maggot bag - a meat pie
  • mash - mashed potatoes
  • mystery bag - a sausage
  • pavpavlova, a large plate sized kind of meringue dessert, with cream and fruit topping. Also used in New Zealand English
  • pie floater – a meat pie floating in a bowl of pea soup. Generally limited to South Australia
  • plate, bring a - instruction on party or BBQ invitation to bring a plate of food to share; it doesn't mean the hosts are short of crockery
  • poofter beer - a derogatory term for any of a variety of canned and bottled pre-mixed coloured alcoholic drinks if drunk by a man
  • sultana - a raisin
  • sanger - a sandwich
  • banger, snagger or snag – a sausage
  • sav - saveloy (see also "fair suck of the sav")
  • snag - a sausage
  • snake - a steak
  • spag bol or spag bog - spaghetti bolognese
  • spud – potato
  • tucker - food
  • tucker-bag - food bag
  • vegies - vegetables

Processed pork[edit]

According to linguists, the easiest way to tell which part of Australia someone comes from is to ask them what they call bland-tasting, processed pork, sold under various brand names in plastic-wrapped tubes. Similar products are known in North America as baloney and in the UK as pork luncheon meat. These are known by different names in different regions of Australia.

Drink, drinking and drunkenness[edit]

  • amber fluid - beer
  • binge - to consume large quantities of alcohol
  • blow in the bag - have a breathalyser test; originates from the days where you would blow into a plastic bag with crystals in it. If the crystals changed colour, you were over the limit.
  • blotto - drunk to the point of being incoherent and/or unable to stand
  • blow chunks - to throw up
  • booze bus - police vehicle used for catching drunk drivers. Also BAD (Breath Alcohol and Drug) bus
  • boozer - a pub
  • bottle shop – a shop selling alcoholic drinks (for external consumption). cf. British English off-licence
  • bottlo or bottle-o - (pronounced IPA(key): /ˈbɔt.l̩ˌəʉ/) diminutive form of bottle shop; ; originally a man with hessian bags going around picking up beer bottles in the late 19th and early 20th century.
  • (to)break the seal- to urinate for the first time during a drinking session. This reputedly leads to further, frequent urination - see half hour wanders
  • Bundy - Bundaberg Rum
  • BYO - unlicensed restaurant where you have to bring your own alcohol, also similar party or barbecue
  • cab sav - cabernet sauvignon (a type of wine or the variety of grape from which it is made)
  • charged - drunk
  • Clayton's - a non-alcoholic cordial drink advertised as "the drink you have when you're not having a drink'. Used as an adjective to denote something second-rate, worthless or false, as in 'Working at Maccas is a Clayton's job'. i.e. a job you have when you haven't got a job.
  • cleanskin - bottle of wine without a label. Usually bought in bulk by companies who then add their own personalised label and use the wine as e.g. gifts to clients
  • coldie - a cold beer
  • Darwin stubby – a very large bottle of beer. Derived from NT Draught bottles, which came in sizes up to 2 litres.
  • dead soldier or dead marine – empty beer bottle
  • drink with the flies - to drink alone
  • drunk tank - police cells used for holding offenders arrested drunk and disorderly
  • echo - in South Australia stubbies were sold with a deposit and returnable for recycling and were therefore known as echoes
  • franz lizst - rhyming slang for pissed
  • full - drunk
  • gin's handbag a wine cask. ('gin' is a highly offensive term for an Aboriginal woman)
  • goog, as full as a - drunk; goog is a variation of the northern English slangword goggie meaning an egg
  • goom - methylated spirits (also known as "metho" or "white lady")
  • goon – cheap cask wine, also can mean the bag containing the wine also know as a goon bag
  • goon of fortune - drinking game where a (full) goon bag is tied to a Hill's Hoist (rotary clothes line) and spun, with the person standing closest to where the bag stops taking a drink. Game ends when all players fall unconscious and/or all the goon is consumed and the pubs are all closed and therefore unable to replentish supply
  • grog - liquor, beer
  • gutful of piss - drunk
  • gutst - drunk
  • hammered - considerably drunk
  • half cut or half-charged - moderately drunk
  • half hour wanders - almost clockwork 30 minute interval pressing requirement to urinate when comsuming alcohol, occurring after break the seal initiated
  • heavy - full strength beer (in comparison to "light", ie low alcohol, beer)
  • hotel - often just a pub
  • Jimmy Woodser one who drinks alone rather than in a school (semi-defunct)
  • king brown- 750ml bottle of beer, used in Western Australia; see tallie
  • legless – drunk
  • longneck - 750ml bottle of beer; used in New South Wales and South Australia; see tallie
  • loose - see also maggoted, drunk, pissed etc - term to describe very drunk. "i'm so loose". Also can be used to describe an event where drinking will be invovled - "things are going to get loose"
  • maggoted - term to describe one as extremely drunk
  • off one's tits or off one's face – to be extremely drunk or otherwise intoxicated
  • piss - alcohol
  • pissed – drunk, also pissed as a parrot
  • piss tank also 'piss head' - one noted for excessive consumption of alcohol
  • piss-up – a drinking session, a party/get-together – usually one where excessive alcohol consumption is expected; sometimes heard in the phrase couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery i.e. disorganised and/or ineffectual
  • plonk - cheap wine (from WWI rhyming slang, plinkety plonk, vin blanc (Fr.white wine)
  • plonko - a person who drinks cheap wine; a wino
  • poofter beer - a derogratory term for any of a variety of can and bottled pre-mixed coloured alcoholic drinks if drunk by a man
  • roadie - a final drink, usually had before heading home / parting ways with drinking partner or school
  • rotten - drunk
  • rubbity - a hotel; rhyming slang for "rubbity dub dub", a pub
  • school - a group of people drinking together, taking it in turns to "shout"
  • shout - turn to buy - a round of drinks usually ("It's your shout.")
  • slab - a carton of 24 bottles or cans of beer, recently augmented in some states by the block, which contains 30 cans.
  • slaughtered - considerably drunk
  • skin full - drunk
  • skull/skol (a beer) - to drink a beer in a single draught without taking a breath
  • smashed - considerably drunk
  • Stollies - Stolichnaya vodka, especially in pre-mixed form
  • stonkered - drunk
  • stubby - a 375 ml bottle of beer
  • stubby holder - polystyrene or neoprene insulated holder for a stubby
  • tallie - a 750 ml bottle of beer; see longneck
  • tanked - Being drunk
  • technicolour yawn or chunder - to throw up, see also blow chunks
  • throw-down - a small bottle of beer which you can drink ("throw down") quickly
  • tinny - can of beer
  • tired and emotional - drunk, originated with ex TV current affairs host Mike Willesee appearing live one night having a giggle fit and slurring his words. Explained away by management the next day as due to him being "tired and emotional".
  • turps - any alcoholic drink
  • turps, hit the - go on a drinking binge
  • VB - no, its not a personal hygiene issue - its an abbreviation for Victoria Bitter, a brand of beer almost as legendary as XXXX (see XXXX)
  • wedge also topper or tweeny - If a member of a school has finished his drink and no one else has, he may order a drink for himself while he waits for the others to finish theirs. This is having, or slipping, a wedge. Someone who does this still has to take his 'shout' when his turn comes round.
  • wobbly boot on, he's got the - drunk
  • XXXX - a popular beer in Queensland, pronounced 'four x'. American visitors should not confuse this brand with the American FourEx, a brand of condom. In other States it is generally held that XXXX is used because Queenslanders can't spell 'beer'.

See also[edit]