Talk:Laurel and Hardy

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RFD 1[edit]

For discussion about keeping this page see Fat and Skinny.

RFV[edit]

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Rfv-sense: by extension: Any duo who are so inept at practical tasks, as to be humorous. Uncited. Would such a sense be a proper noun? Also the translations of the proper noun seem suspect, not to mention the proper noun itself. DCDuring TALK 01:03, 5 January 2011 (UTC)

The translations look OK to me in the sense that that's how Laurel and Hardy appear to be called in those languages, if we believe Wikipedia. But I doubt if they are correct translations for the sense "inept duo". At least in Finland one would prefer Pekka ja Pätkä according to a domestic funny duo. --Hekaheka 15:37, 6 January 2011 (UTC)
I suspect that there are regional and generational differences for the "extended" sense. "Mutt and Jeff" would work for many in the US, based on their newspaper comic strip, roughly contemporaneously with Laurel and Hardy. There are numerous "buddy" pairings that have some cultural resonance, eg, Starsky and Hutch, Burns and Allen, Bob and Ray. It is not very hard to cite them if our standard allows "the Starsky and Hutch of" to count. DCDuring TALK 19:23, 6 January 2011 (UTC)
I've added quotations to Citations:Laurel and Hardy; all but one (the 2009 one) seem to use the second sense. - -sche (discuss) 02:54, 17 August 2011 (UTC)
Moved to RFD. - -sche (discuss) 18:47, 14 September 2011 (UTC)


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This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


Laurel and Hardy

From RFV. There are four quotations which use the phrase on the citations page, but no consensus was reached on whether they verified the term or not. See also WT:RFV#Mona Lisa. - -sche (discuss) 18:54, 14 September 2011 (UTC)

Struck. Note my changes to the entry. - -sche (discuss) 02:22, 31 March 2012 (UTC)