Talk:as well as

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

RFV[edit]

Keep tidy.svg

The following information has failed Wiktionary's verification process..

Failure to be verified may either mean that this information is fabricated, or is merely beyond our resources to confirm. We have archived here the disputed information, the verification discussion, and any documentation gathered so far, pending further evidence.
Do not re-add this information to the article without also submitting proof that it meets Wiktionary's criteria for inclusion. See also Wiktionary:Previously deleted entries.


===Conjunction===
# [[also]]; as well
# [[too]]; [[likewise]]; in addition
===Preposition===
# And in addition to; and [[furthermore]].

I added a second POS for the prepositional sense, but we need to clarify the conjunction sense(s). Are there really multiple conjunction senses or is that one sense split into two lines? Also I am not a fan of the definition line I made for the preposition, so if someone wants to reword that so it is less awkward that would be spiffy. - TheDaveRoss 23:32, 18 January 2011 (UTC)

Tangentially: I seem to recall some {{nonstandard}} use at the start of a sentence as a synonym of also or further (adverb, I guess). Googling for it is hard, but my attempts so far have not been fruitful.​—msh210 (talk) 23:43, 18 January 2011 (UTC)
I've definitely heard "as well" alone used that way — it's hard to Google for, but I did find this page with two uses — but "as well as"? Crazy! —RuakhTALK 23:50, 18 January 2011 (UTC)
Yes, this one has been giving me headaches trying to track down cites for, I am just going by "I know I have heard this..." which is not something I like to do if I can help it. - TheDaveRoss 00:09, 19 January 2011 (UTC)
As well as the obvious security problems, giving out usernames and passwords to unsecure sites and programs can just be damn embarrassing. comes from LiveJournal
As well as the obvious things that hit you immediately when you arrive, such as sights, sounds, smells and tastes, every culture has unspoken rules which ... comes from UW Counseling Center
As well as the obvious category of hiring web space on a server (the cost of which which will almost certainly be negligible assuming the site is to be hosted on an ISP) comes from Producing for the Web (almost a real book!)
As well as the obvious benefits, such as improved access, we should try to make a realistic estimate of the preservation potential, the learning potential, what I might call the synergy potential. comes from Multimedia preservation (Aussies?)
I guess I just need to pick more phrases which I think will get results and search for them. I like your new definition msh, thanks. - TheDaveRoss 00:16, 19 January 2011 (UTC)
That sort of prepositional usage doesn't seem to be too rare; [1][2][3][4] are all the sense you have in mind, yes? But I can't think of a sense like Msh210 mentions. —RuakhTALK 00:22, 19 January 2011 (UTC)
The only times I can think of it being used that way are combined with "that" or "this"; "As well as that there are..." and that wouldn't be prepositional, it would be adverbial. I guess that is what msh said. - TheDaveRoss 00:26, 19 January 2011 (UTC)
I meant something like "My babysitter called in sick. As well as, my car broke down.".​—msh210 (talk) 20:16, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
As a conjunction, doesn't it just mean "and", with the second, following term being "backgrounded" ? Perhaps it needs a non-gloss definition.
The putative prepositional use seems to hinge on it being used to introduce some kind of adjunct. CGEL insists that it should be considered as as well#Adverb + as#Preposition. Huddlestone et al insist that in all cases what they view as the PP headed by "as" is optional. DCDuring TALK 00:32, 19 January 2011 (UTC)
  • I have RfVed the other previous sense, which is for an adverbial sense which I don't think this has. AFAICT, apart from it use in similes (here {{&lit}}), this means "and in addition". Inexplicably, both of the senses given for this in 2006 were for non-existent adverbial senses. The conjunction sense was omitted as well. Simply checking the PoS of the senses given or substituting the definitions into the usage examples should have brought our attention to the problems. DCDuring TALK 21:41, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 23:26, 5 October 2011 (UTC)