chine

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See also: Chine and chiné

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English chyne, from Middle French eschine.

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

chine (plural chines)

  1. The top of a ridge.
  2. The spine of an animal.
    • Dryden
      And chine with rising bristles roughly spread.
    • 1883: Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      [] the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been intercepted by our big signboard []
  3. A piece of the backbone of an animal, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking.
  4. (nautical) a sharp angle in the cross section of a hull
  5. The edge or rim of a cask, etc., formed by the projecting ends of the staves; the chamfered end of a stave.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chine (third-person singular simple present chines, present participle chining, simple past and past participle chined)

  1. (transitive) To cut through the backbone of; to cut into chine pieces.
  2. To chamfer the ends of a stave and form the chine.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English chin (crack, fissure, chasm), from Old English cine, cinu. The Old English term is cognate to Old Saxon kena, and is related to the Old English verb cīnan ("to grow in size, crack, split, gape"), from Proto Germanic *kīnaną ("to sprout, germinate, split open"), from Proto-Indo-European *geie ("to split open, to sprout").

Noun[edit]

chine (plural chines)

  1. (Southern England) a steep-sided ravine leading from the top of a cliff down to the sea
    • J. Ingelow
      The cottage in a chine.
    • 1988, Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming Pool Library, Penguin Books (1988), page 169
      In the odorous stillness of the day I thought of the tracks that threaded Egdon Heath, and of benign, elderly Sandbourne, with its chines and sheltered beach-huts.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

chine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of chiner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of chiner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of chiner
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of chiner
  5. second-person singular imperative of chiner

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chine m

  1. Lenited form of cine.

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

chine f pl

  1. feminine plural of chino

Noun[edit]

chine f

  1. plural form of china