clough

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See also: Clough

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English clough, clow, Old English *clōh, from Proto-Germanic *klanhaz (cleft, sluice, abyss), from Proto-Indo-European *gle-, *gel- (to ball up, amass, stick together). Related to Old English clingan (to wither, pine, shrink up, cling). Perhaps conflated or influenced by Old Norse klofi (a cleft or rift in a hill, ravine); compare Dutch kloof (a slit, crevice, chink). More at cling, clove.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /klʌf/, /kləf/, /klaʊ/
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Particularly: "US"

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

clough (plural cloughs)

  1. (Northern England, US) A narrow valley; a cleft in a hillside; a ravine, glen, or gorge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)
  2. A sluice used in returning water to a channel after depositing its sediment on the flooded land.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  3. A cliff; a rocky precipice.
  4. (dialectal) The cleft or fork of a tree; crotch.
  5. (dialectal) A wood; weald.

Etymology 2[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

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Particularly: "UK"
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Particularly: "US"

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

clough (plural cloughs)

  1. Formerly an allowance of two pounds in every three hundredweight after the tare and tret are subtracted; now used only in a general sense, of small deductions from the original weight.

References[edit]