dialectic

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dialectique, from Late Latin dialectica, from Ancient Greek διαλεκτική (dialektikḗ, the art of argument through interactive questioning and answering), from διαλεκτικός (dialektikós, competent debater), from διαλέγομαι (dialégomai, to participate in a dialogue), from διά (diá, through, across) + λέγειν (légein, to speak).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌdaɪəˈlɛktɪk/

Noun[edit]

dialectic (plural dialectics)

  1. Any formal system of reasoning that arrives at a truth by the exchange of logical arguments.
  2. A contradiction of ideas that serves as the determining factor in their interaction.
    This situation created the inner dialectic of American history.

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dialectic (comparative more dialectic, superlative most dialectic)

  1. dialectical