egregious

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prefix e- (out of), + grex (flock), + English adjective suffix -ous, from Latin suffix -osus (full of); reflecting the positive connotations of "standing out from the flock".

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

egregious (comparative more egregious, superlative most egregious)

  1. Exceptional, conspicuous, outstanding, most usually in a negative fashion.
    The student has made egregious errors on the examination.
  2. Outrageously bad; shocking.

Usage notes[edit]

The negative meaning arose in the late 16th century, probably originating in sarcasm. Before that, it meant outstanding in a good way. Webster also gives “distinguished” as an archaic form, and notes that its present form often has an unpleasant connotation (e.g., "an egregious error"). It generally precedes such epithets as “rogue,” “rascal,” "ass," “blunderer”.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]