rogue

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See also: rogué

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From either:

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rogue (plural rogues)

  1. A scoundrel, rascal or unprincipled, deceitful, and unreliable person.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      “… No rogue e’er felt the halter draw, with a good opinion of the law, and perhaps my own detestation of the law arises from my having frequently broken it. […]”
    • July 18 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Dark Knight Rises[2]
      As The Dark Knight Rises brings a close to Christopher Nolan’s staggeringly ambitious Batman trilogy, it’s worth remembering that director chose The Scarecrow as his first villain—not necessarily the most popular among the comic’s gallery of rogues, but the one who set the tone for entire series.
  2. A mischievous scamp.
    • Shakespeare
      Ah, you sweet little rogue, you!
  3. A vagrant.
  4. Deceitful software pretending to be anti-spyware, but in fact being malicious software itself.
  5. An aggressive animal separate from the herd, especially an elephant.
  6. A plant that shows some undesirable variation.
    • 2000 Carol Deppe, Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties, Totnes: Chelsea Green Pub.
      Maintaining varieties also requires selection, however. It's usually referred to as culling or roguing. ...we examine the [plant] population and eliminate the occasional rogue.
  7. (role-playing games) A character class focusing on stealthy conduct.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

rogue (comparative more rogue, superlative most rogue)

  1. (of an animal, especially an elephant) Vicious and solitary.
  2. (by extension) Large, destructive and unpredictable.
  3. (by extension) Deceitful, unprincipled.
    • 2004: Chris Wallace, Character: Profiles in Presidential Courage
      In the minds of Republican hard-liners, the "Silent Majority" of Americans who had elected the President, and even Nixon's two Democrat predecessors, China was a gigantic nuke-wielding rogue state prepared to overrun the free world at any moment.
  4. Mischievous, unpredictable.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55: 
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rogue (third-person singular simple present rogues, present participle roguing, simple past and past participle rogued)

  1. (horticulture) To cull; to destroy plants not meeting a required standard. Especially when saving seed, rogue or unwanted plants are removed before pollination.
    • 2000 Carol Deppe, Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties, Totnes: Chelsea Green Pub.
      Maintaining varieties also requires selection, however. It's usually referred to as culling or roguing. ...we examine the [plant] population and eliminate the occasional rogue.
  2. (obsolete) To give the name or designation of rogue to; to decry.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cudworth to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To wander; to play the vagabond; to play knavish tricks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French rogue, from Old Northern French *rogue (fish eggs), from Old Norse hrogn (roe), from Proto-Germanic *hrugną (spawn, roe), from Proto-Indo-European *krek- (spawn, frogspawn). More at roe.

Noun[edit]

rogue f (plural rogues)

  1. roe (clarification of this French definition is being sought)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French rogue, from Old French rogre (haughty; aggressive; exhilarated), from Old Norse hrokr (excess; insolence). Cognate with Icelandic hrokur (arrogance).

Adjective[edit]

rogue (masculine and feminine, plural rogues)

  1. haughty
  2. contemptuous
  3. roguish

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rogue m, f (plural rogues)

  1. arrogant; haughty

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

rogue

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of rogar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of rogar
  3. first-person singular imperative of rogar
  4. third-person singular imperative of rogar