fraid

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English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fraid

  1. Eye dialect spelling of afraid.
    • 1912, Edith Van Dyne, Aunt Jane's Nieces on Vacation[1]:
      Guess ye'd better speak to 'em about spendin' so much money, Mr. Merrick; I'm 'fraid they may need it some day." "
    • 1873, Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, The Gilded Age, Complete[2]:
      When a man is 'gaged in prah, he ain't fraid o' nuffin--dey can't nuffin tetch him."
    • 1872, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Oldtown Fireside Stories[3]:
      "Yis," he continued, "there was a time when folks said I could a hed Miry ef I'd asked her; and I putty much think so myself, but I didn't say nothin': marriage is allers kind o'ventursome; an' Miry had such up-and-down kind o' ways, I was sort o' fraid on't.

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French froit, from Latin frīgidus, from frīgeō, frīgēre (be cold).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fraid m (feminine fraide, masculine plural fraids, feminine plural fraides)

  1. cold

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan, Surmiran) freid
  • (Sutsilvan) fred

Etymology[edit]

From Latin frīgidus (cold, cool, chilling), from frīgeō, frīgēre (be cold).

Adjective[edit]

fraid m (feminine fraida, masculine plural fraids, feminine plural fraidas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) cold

Synonyms[edit]