frore

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English froren, past participle of fresen (to freeze), from Old English frēosan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frore (comparative more frore, superlative most frore)

  1. (archaic) Extremely cold; frozen.
    • 1818, Percy Shelley, The Revolt of Islam, canto 9:
      We die, even as the winds of Autumn fade,
      Expiring in the frore and foggy air.
    • 1883, Religion in Europe, historically considered, page 13:
      For heavenly beauty, mid perennial springs, Feels not the change, which frore sad winter brings.
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLVI, lines 15-16
      Or if one haulm whose year is o'er / Shivers on the upland frore.
    • c. 1916,, Rupert Brooke, Song
      My heart all Winter lay so numb / The earth so dead and frore.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

frore

  1. (archaic, rare) simple past tense of freeze
    • c. 1834,, Mary Howitt, The Sea:
      And down below all fretted and frore, []