impactful

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From impact +‎ -ful

Adjective[edit]

impactful (comparative more impactful, superlative most impactful)

  1. Having impact. [from c. 1940]
    • 1950, Movies: A Psychological Study[1], edition Digitized, Free Press, published 2008, page 22:
      We might suppose that some of the most impactful heroines of current films would combine these two functions: that of the good-bad girl ...
    • 1969, W. James Popham, "Curriculum Materials," Review of Educational Research, vol. 39, no. 3, p. 321:
      It is strongly recommended that in the future such investigations not be reported in the literature unless they are designed to test the effects of some hopefully impactful treatment variation.
    • 1982, S. E. Taylor and S. C. Thompson, "Stalking the Elusive 'Vividness' Effect," Psychological Bulletin, vol. 89, no. 2, p. 155:
      Everyone knows that vividly presented information is impactful and persuasive.
    • 2001, A. Mukherjee and W. D. Hoyer, "The Effect of Novel Attributes on Product Evaluation," The Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 28, no. 3, p. 463:
      A dominant finding in psychology and consumer behavior has been that negative information is more impactful than positive information.
    • 2013 March 22, “Pals organise night out to remember Florence”, West Sussex Gazette:
      “The evening will help to raise money to create a place where children can have fun and enjoy playing for years to come; a fitting legacy of a short-lived but impactful life."

Usage notes[edit]

  • Proscribed by some authorities, who recommend “influential” or “effective” instead.[1] Alternatively, one may rephrase to “have an impact” or “have a strong impact”. However, many usages can be found, particularly in business and education[1] as well as in journalism and academic writing.
  • Usage is more common in the US.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 impactful”, Brians, Paul Common Errors in English Usage, (2nd Edition, November 17, 2008), William, James & Company, 304 pp., ISBN 978-1-59028207-6