jacquerie

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Jacquerie uprising of French peasants in 1358, from Jacques (a derogatory nickname for peasants) + -erie.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʒaˈkɹi/, /ˈʒak(ə)ɹi/

Noun[edit]

jacquerie (plural jacqueries)

  1. A violent revolt by peasants.
    • 1911, Saki, ‘The Stampeding of Lady Bastable’, The Chronicles of Clovis:
      A jacquerie, even if carried out with the most respectful of intentions, cannot fail to leave some traces of embarrassment behind it.
    • 1951, Isaac Asimov, Foundation (1974 Panther Books Ltd publication), part V: “The Merchant Princes”, chapter 18, page 185, ¶ 9:
      “Is that what you’re setting your hopes on, man? What do you expect? A housewives’ rebellion? A Jacquerie?[”]
    • 1986, G Krishnan-Kutty, Peasantry in India, p. 71:
      Whenever a jacquerie occurred, the authorities looked "upon it as a revolt of the underdog against his native oppressor."

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Jacquerie, from Jacques (a derogatory nickname for peasants) +‎ -erie.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jacquerie f (plural jacqueries)

  1. peasants' revolt, jacquerie

External links[edit]