many a time and oft

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Repetion for emphasis.

Adverb[edit]

many a time and oft (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or literary) Frequently.
    • c. 1596-1598, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act 1, Scene 3, 1999 [1996], The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, page 392,
      Signor Antonio, many a time and oft / In the Rialto you have rated me / About my monies, and my usances:
    • 1798, William Wordsworth, The Thorn, 1851, Henry Reed (editor), The Complete Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, page 183,
      And all that winter, when at night / The wind blew from the mountain-peak, / 'Twas worth your while, though in the dark, / The church-yard path to seek: / For many a time and oft were heard / Cries coming from the mountain-head:
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, Chapter VII: How Little John Lived at the Sherriff's, 2011, page 56,
      "How? And art thou indeed Little John, and Robin Hood's own right-hand man? Many a time and oft I heard of thee, but never did I hope to set eyes upon thee. [] "
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Episode 13: Nausicäa, 1998 [1993], Jeri Johnson (notes), Oxford University Press, page 331,
      The three girl friends were seated on the rocks, enjoying the evening scene and the air which was fresh but not too chilly. Many a time and oft were they wont to come there to that favourite nook to have a cosy chat beside the sparkling waves and discuss matters feminine, [] .