quod erat demonstrandum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quod erat dēmonstrandum (that which was to be proved), calqued from Ancient Greek ὅπερ ἔδει δεῖξαι (hóper édei deîksai, precisely what was required to be proved).

Phrase[edit]

quod erat demonstrandum (plural quae erant demonstranda)

  1. (something) which was to be proved; which was to be demonstrated.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kʷodˈe.rat.deː.monˈstran.dum/, [kʷodˈe.rat.deː.mõːˈstran.dũ]

Etymology[edit]

From quod the nominative neuter singular of quī and erat (was) the third-person singular imperfect active indicative of sum (I am) and dēmonstrandum (thing to be proven) nominative neuter singular of dēmonstrandus which is the future passive participle of dēmonstrō (I demonstrate). Literally meaning "(that) which was to be demonstrated".

Phrase[edit]

quod erat dēmonstrandum (plural quae erant dēmonstranda)

  1. which was to be proved; which was to be demonstrated.

Derived terms[edit]