Citations:Gillette

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English citations of Gillette

Proper noun: "A city in Wyoming, USA"[edit]

1911 1970 1979 1980 1981 1982 2000 2011 2012 2014 2019
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1911 — Anson Roger Graves, "The Farmer Boy Who Became a Bishop; The Autobiography of The Right Reverend Anson Roger Graves", page 189:
    Some four or five years ago I sent a missionary to the little village of Gillette, Wyoming, to spy out the land. He reported that there were not only no Church people there, but none who cared for Christian services of any kind. Cowboys and saloonkeepers ran the town.
  • 1911 — E. L. Mathewson, Hall-Scott: Aviation Power Plants Mean Professional Success, in "Aeronautics", volume 9, number 3:
    Gillette, Wyoming, is a very rough country in more ways than one, and it was up to us to fly at ten o'clock, wind or no wind, as per advertisement.
  • 1911 — Louis Moreau, Barbarians in America, in "Industrial Worker", volume 4, number 20, page 3:
    I have travelled far and wide and have lived among people called savages (uncivilized), but never did I meet such a low degree of intelligence as I witnessed at Gillette, Wyo.
  • 1970 — John D. Holaday, Letter of September 4, 1970, to GLR A1 in Walker from John D. Holaday, Executive Secretary, Wyoming State AFL-CIO (Seay exhibit 761), in "The Hundred Million Dollar Payoff", page 220.
    I cannot say enough for the help the Machinists have given us in this election. Not only with the computer system, but with your fine assistance in Gillette, Wyoming which, in my opinion, is the "Hell hole of Wyoming."
  • 1979 — United States Department of Commerce, Boomtown Problems, in "Jobs Through Economic Development":
    In those 18 years, Gillette, a small town in northeastern Wyoming, has changed from a group of houses and a railroad depot servicing a ranching and farming community to a mining boomtown, growing at a rate of 15 to 20 percent a year.
  • 1980 — John S. Gallagher and Alan H. Patera, in "Wyoming Post Offices 1850-1980", page 38:
    Gillette has become a modern "boom town" because of the expanded operations at the Wyodak coal mine, one of the largest open-pit mines in the world.
  • 1981 — Unknown, t-shirt slogan, Powder River Basin: New Energy Frontier, in "National Geographic Special Report: Energy", volume 81, number 2, page 101:
    Where in the hell is Gillette Wyoming
  • 1982 — Craig Vetter, Boom Dreams, in "Playboy", page 118:
    Then I told him I had been broke for a week in a dirty, ugly, cold, treeless little oil-and-coal boom town called Gillette, and I'd liked it.
  • 1982 — Craig Vetter, Boom Dreams, in "Playboy", page 118:
    Nobody ever went to Gillette, Wyoming for the hell of it. It was born in 1892 as a railhead village from which the ranchers of the Powder River basin could ship their cattle and pick up their necessaries.
  • 2000 — Deborah Kent, in "America the Beautiful: Wyoming", page 73:
    Gillette lies in the shadow of the Black Hills in parched, treeless northeastern Wyoming.
  • 2011 — Anne Marie Chaker, School Diet and Exercise Programs May Go Too Far, in "Should Junk Food Be Sold In Schools?", pages 70–1:
    Gillette is a dusty, bustling coal-mining center in north-eastern Wyoming, bisected by a railroad operated by Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp., which delivers coal to such cities as Chicago and Centralia, Wash.
  • 2012 — Anonymous Gillette citizen, in "City of Gillette 2012 Citizen Survey Report", part 2, page 1:
    Wouldn't want to have my home burglarized especially with me in it; I do find some of Gillette's citizens, more than usual, scary and capable of any criminal act.
  • 2014 — Monica Moses, Creative Outliers, in "American Craft", page 6:
    By one estimate, there are as many full-time craft artists in the United States as there are people in the town of Gillette, Wyoming. Never heard of Gillette? Well, no wonder; like the universe of craft artists, it has a relatively small population.
  • 2019 — Phyllis Von Fleckinger, in "Visiting Hell and Back Again":
    I lived 43 years in Gillette WY where we had 9 months of winter and 3 months of crappy weather. If you were out of town on the 4th of July you missed summer…