Jekyll and Hyde

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See also: Jekyll-and-Hyde

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛkəl ænd haɪd/
  • IPA(key): /dʒiːkəl ænd haɪd/ (original pronunciation, now rare)

Noun[edit]

Jekyll and Hyde (plural Jekylls and Hydes or Jekyll and Hydes)

  1. Someone or something that has two sides: one good (the "Dr. Jekyll") and one bad (the "Mr. Hyde").
    • 1974, “H2Ogate Blues”, in Winter in America, performed by Gil Scott-Heron:
      America! / The international Jekyll and Hyde / The land of a thousand disguises / Sneaks up on you but rarely surprises
    • 1977, “Dark Shroud of the Past!”, in Uncanny X-Men, number 106, page 31:
      Charles Xavier: That was my… Evil self, X-Men. The Charles Xavier who would use his powers for personal gain and conquest--The Mr. Hyde to my Dr. Jekyll.
    • 1989, “Super DuckTales Part 3: Full Metal Duck”, in DuckTales, season 3, episode 8:
      GizmoDuck: Excuse me! Just a little case of Jekyll and Hyde, that's all!
    • 2011, Mark Ryan, Geometry Essentials For Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 5:
      Studying geometry is sort of a Dr. Jekyll-and-Mr. Hyde thing. You have the ordinary geometry of shapes (the Dr. Jekyll part) and the strange world of geometry proofs (the Mr. Hyde part).

See also[edit]