Talk:maverick

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I don't think individualista is a good translation for maverick. The appropiate word is rebelde or inconforme

I'm not sure about that language, but it's appropriate in English. -116.232.51.127 12:15, 30 September 2008 (UTC)
Since we're talking about a translation, whether or not the word is appropriate in the destination language might be more important than whether similar sounding words are appropriate in the starting language. Dumbfuck. SummerGlau 18:32, 8 May 2009 (UTC)

Include?[edit]

5. In common parlance in the western world, means one who seems to 'float' between many friend circles, always bored or never satisfied by one clique.

The noun with the meaning "One who creates or uses unconventional and/or controversial ideas or practices."[edit]

First, it is used with that meaning or something close in http://www.amazon.com/Trick-Treatment-Undeniable-Alternative-Medicine/dp/0393066614, p. 36-37

Florence Nightingale would have been perceived as a maverick dur-
ing her early career, because she was prioritizing hygiene when
everybody else involved in healthcare was focused on other things ,
such as surgery and pills. But she proved that she was right and that the
establishment was wrong.
James Lind was also a maverick who turned out to be right , because
he showed that lemons were effective for scurvy when the medical
establishment was promoting all sorts of other remedies . Alexander
Hamilton was another maverick who knew more than the establish-
ment , because he argued against bloodletting in an era when bleeding
was a standard procedure. And Hill and Doll were mavericks , because
they showed that smoking was a surprisingly deadly indulgence, and
moreover they produced data that stood up against the powerful
interests of the cigarette industry.

Second, my english danish dictionary gives a similarly meaning danish word.

Given the above, I will restore the meaning and add a quote.--Deleet 03:36, 2 June 2011 (UTC)

Hebrew?[edit]

מבריק (Mav-rik) in Hebrew means brilliant but is also used to describe exceptional generosity.