Talk:plead

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Any idea when the simple past is pleaded and when it's pled? JillianE 17:16, 20 January 2006 (UTC)

I find

  • The Advanced Learners Dictionary of Current English giving the past tense and past participle as pleaded or (USA) plead (/pled/)
  • Pons English<->German Großwörterbuch giving the past tense and past participle as pleaded or (Scot, USA) pled (/pled/)

Ncik 02:42, 21 January 2006 (UTC)

Pled is always wrong[edit]

The past tense and past participle of "plead" is "pleaded". There is no "pled". This entry should be updated to reflect that. Yes, apparently there are or were a few Scotsmen (and unfortunately, a lot of Americans) who think that because "plead" resembles the Anglo-Saxon words "bleed", "feed", "flee" and so on, that it is declined the same way. Actually, "plead" is not an Anglo-Saxonism - it comes from Old French. It is declined as a weak regular verb - by adding -ed. Just because one word resembles other words doesn't mean it is declined the same way (always a dangerous assumption when dealing with the English language). Bottom line, "pled" is wrong and should never be used.

That sounds pretty POV to me...pretty CW/UK POV to be specific. "He pled guilty" appears in writing here in the US every day. Do you have citations from official usage guides you'd like to add into a ===Usage note=== section here? Please be sure to indicate your usage note is UK-specific. --Connel MacKenzie T C 00:27, 13 February 2006 (UTC)

I agree with the first entry, but verbs are *conjugated*. Nouns are declined. 88.14.200.129 13:18, 24 August 2008 (UTC)

Pled has been noted since ME: Þis Agamundus to þe abbay of Wylton had gret enuy..& long for hit, for-sothe, he pladde. — Life of Saint Edith of Wilton. I put a quote in the citations tab. --AnWulf ... Ferþu Hal! (talk) 02:37, 23 June 2012 (UTC)
AnWulf is correct, the alternative form pled has nothing much to do with Anglo-Saxon, but was a common mode of forming past tenses in Middle English (pleden [stem pled-] + -de = pledde > pled), similar to sleep/slept, deal/dealt, mean/meant, weep/wept--all Middle English byspels of vowel shortening in closed syllables. Leasnam (talk) 19:40, 25 June 2012 (UTC)