User:Visviva/Medical/By links/A

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  1. acor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      acor (a'-kor) [L.]. Acrimony: acidity, as of the stomach.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      a'cor [L. a sour taste.] Gastric acidity, pyrosis.
  2. acrisia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      acrisia (ah-kris'-t-ah) [4, priv.; crisis]. The absence of a crisis from a disease; an unfavorable crisis or turn in the course of an attack of disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      acrisia (a-kris'I-ah) [G. a- priv. + krisis, judgment.] A condition in which diagnosis and especially prognosis are uncertain.
  3. addiment - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      addiment (ad'-im-rnt) [addere, to add]. Ehrlich'a and Moigenroth's term (1809) for an active thermolabile substance (destroyed by a temperature of 56° C.) contained In normal serum and capable of rendering active the immune body of Ebrlich and setting up bacteriolysis and hemolysis. See complement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      addiment (ad'im-ent). Same as complement.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      addiment (ad'im-ent). Syn.: complement. A substance described by Ehrlich. which resembles a ferment in its action and is present in normal serum. It is destroyed by 56° to 58° C, and when attached to such cells as bacteria or red blood corpuscles by the intermediary body or amboceptor it dissolves or destroys these substances by bacteriolysis or hemolysis. [Lat., addere, to add.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ad'diment [L. additamentum, an increase.] Complement.
  4. adipoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adipoma (ad-ip-o'mah), pi. adipo'mata. Cruveilhicr's term for lipoma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adipo'ma[L. adeps(adip-),iat, + G. -dma.] Lipoma.
  5. adipositas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      adipositas (ad-ip-os'-il-as) [L.]. Fatness; corpulency, a. cordis, a fatty condition of the heart, a. liniversa'lis, obesity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adipositas (ad-ip-os'it-as) [L.]. Fatness, a. cerebra'lis. See cerebral adiposity, under adiposity, a. cor'dis. See fatty heart, 2d def. a. ex vacuo, fatty atrophy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adipositas (ad-I-pos'l-tas). Adiposis, adiposity. a. ex vac'uo, fatty atrophy.*
  6. adiposuria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      adiposuria (ad-ip-o-su'-re-ah). The presence of fat in the urine. Lipuria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adiposuria (ad-ip-o-su're-ah) [L. ad'eps fat + Gr. ovpov urine]. The occurrence of fat in the urine; lipuria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adiposu'ria (L. adeps(adip-), fat, + G. ouron, urine.] Lipuria.
  7. adminiculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adminiculum (ad-min-ik'u-lum) [LJ. 1. A support. 2. The expansion of fibers extending from the superior pubic ligament to the posterior surface of the linea alba. Called also a. lin'eie al'btr.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adminic'ulum [L. prop, stay.] i. That which gives support to a part. a. Adjuvant, a. lin'ese al'bce, a triangular fibrous expansion, sometimes containing a few muscular fibers, passing from the superior pubic ligament to the posterior surface of the linea alba.
  8. aerophore - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aerophore (a'-tr-o-fdr) [dijp. air; >'>*>"t", to carry], I. A device for inflating the lungs of a still-born child with air. 2. A breathing apparatus, used by firemen and others, to prevent the inhalation of noxious gases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aerophore (a'er-o-f6r) [G. air, air, + pharos, bearing.] i. Air-conducting. 2. A portable apparatus for purifying air so that it can be breathed over again. 3. An apparatus for forcing air into the lungs in the treatment of asphyxia.
  9. afferentia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      afferentia (af-er-en'she-ab) [L.]. i. Any afferent vessels, whether blood- or lymph-vessels. ». The lymph-vessels in general.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      afferentia (S-fer-en'sM-ah) [L.] Vasa afferentia, afferent vessels; specifically the afferent* arteries of the kidneys.
  10. agamont - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      agamont (ah'gam-ont) [Gr. a not + -y 0/105 marriage + uf being]. Same as sckizonl.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ag'amont [G. a- priv. + gamos, marriage, + dn(ont-), being.] A non-sexual spore-like body forming one of the stages in the life-cycle of certain parasitic protozoans.
  11. agamous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      agamous (ah'gam-us). Agamic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      agamous (ag'a-mus) [G. agamos, unmarried.] Noting non-sexual reproduction, as by fission, budding, etc.
  12. agastric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      agastric (ah-gas'-trik) [see agaster]. Without an intestinal canal, as the tape-worms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      agastric (ah-gas'trik) [Gr. a neg. + yatrriip stomach]. Having no alimentary canal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      agastric (ah-gas'trik) [Gr. a neg. + yaariip stomach]. Having no alimentary canal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      agas'tric [G. a priv. + gaster, belly.] Without stomach or digestive tract.
  13. agoniadin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      agoniadin (ag-on-i'-ad-in), ('i.iHuOs. A glucoside found in Agonia bark, and used as an antiperiodic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      agoni'adin. A glucoside, Cj0H14O obtained from the bark of Plumeria lancifolia and other species of P.; employed as a febrifuge in malaria in doses of gr. 2-4 (0.12-0.25).
  14. ainhum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ainhum (an'hum, or. Portuguese, In-yoon') [African]. A disease, also called dactylolysis spontanea, chiefly of African countries, in which the little toe, and sometimes other toes, drop off. The course of the disease is slow and the cause is unknown.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ainhum (an'hum). A disease of African countries characterized by the formation of a constricting ring around one or more digits, usually the little toe, and the gradual spontaneous amputation of the affected part. [Said to be an African word meaning "to saw."]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ainhum (In'yoom) [from an African (Nagos) word meaning to saw.] Spontaneous amputation of a toe by a constricting fibrous ring; it affects chiefly male negroes in the tropics.
  15. akoria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      akoria (ah-ko're ah). See acoria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      akoria (ah-ko're ah). See acoria.
  16. albuminone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      albuminone (al-bu'-min-on) [albumin]. A principle derived from certain albuminoids; it is soluble in alcohol and is not coagulable by heat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      albuminone (al-bu'min-on). A principle from various albuminoids, soluble in alcohol and not coagulated by heat.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      albu'minone. Albumone.
  17. albuminosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      albuminosis (al-bu-min-o'-sis) [albumin]. Abnormal increase of the albuminous elements in the blood, or the condition that results from such increase.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      albuminosis (al-bu-min-o'sis). An abnormal increase of the albuminous elements of the blood, or a condition resulting from such an increase.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      albumino'sis. A condition characterized by an abnormal increase in the albuminous constituents of the blood plasma.
  18. alcogel - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alcogel (al'-ko-jel). A jelly-like combination of alcohol and silicic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alcogel (al'ko-jcl). A gel which contains alcohol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alcogel (al'ko-jel). A gel which contains alcohol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alcogel (al'ko-jel). Same as a hydrogel. with alcohol instead of water as the dispersion means.
  19. alecithal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alecithal (ak-les'-ith-aT) [d, priv.; Xextfot. yolk]. A term applied to certain ova having the foodyolk absent, or present only iu very small quantity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alecithal (al-es'ith-al) [G. a- priv. +' lekithos, yolk.] Without yolk, noting ova, if such exist, in which there is no deutoplasm; in general,noting the mammalian ovum in which there is no distinct yolk.
  20. alembroth - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alembroth (al-emf-broth) [origin unknown]. An old name for a compound of the chlorides of ammonium and mercury. Its solution has been used as an antiseptic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alembroth (al-em'broth). A compound, (NH4CD.HgCl, + 2HjO, of mercuric and ammonium chlorids. It is used as an antiseptic dressing.
  21. aleurometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aleurometer (al-u-rom'-et-er) [aleuron; ptrpw, a measure]. An instrument used for the examination of crude gluten as to its power of distending under the influence of heat, as a means of judging of the value of a flour for bread-making.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aleurometer (al-u-rom'et-er) [Gr. &\tvpov flour -ffiirpov measure]. An instrument for determining the value of flour for bread-making purposes.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      aleurom'eter. An apparatus for testing the suitability of flour for breadmaking. [Gr., aleuron, flour, + metron, measure.]
  22. alexin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alexin (al-ek'sin) [Gr. dX«£«* to help, to ward off]. 1. Same as complement. 2. Any defensive protein (Buchner). As now used the term is synonymous with complement, leukocytic a. See Irukin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alexin (al-ek'sin) [Gr. ,'i\i:..n- to help, to ward off].
  23. alexipharmac - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alexipharmac (al-ek-sif-ar'mak) [Gr dXefeix to repel + ^apuanov poison], r. Warding off the ill effects of a poison. 2. An antidote or remedy for poisoning. ' * ' *
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alexipharmac (al-ek-sif-ar'mak) [Gr. tpippaxo* poison], i. Warding off the ill effects of a poison. 2. An antidote or remedy for poisoning.
  24. alexipyretic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alexipyretic (al-eks-e-pi'~ret-ik) [dXi£et*. to ward off; wperfa, a fever], I* A febrifuge. 2. Acting as a febrifuge. _
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alexipyretic (al-ek"sip-i-ret'ik) [Gr. a\i£av to ward off + Ti>p«tos fever], i. Preventive of fevers. 2. A febrifugal medicine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alexipyretic (a-lek"sl-pi-ret'ik) [G. alexo, I ward off, + fyretos, fever.] Febrifuge.
  25. algesimeter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      algesimeter (al^es-im'-et-er) [4Xy«, pain; ptTpav, a measure]. An instrument for determining the acutenesa of the sense of pain, a., Bjornstrom's, one to test the sensibility of the skin, a., Boas', an instrument consisting of a pad and spring, used to determine the relative sensitiveness over the epigastrium. The normal tolerance is 9 to 10 kilograms; In cases of gastric ulcer, x to a kilograms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      algesimeter (al-je-sim'et-er) [Gr. 4X7170-15 pain + titrpov measure]. An instrument used in measuring the sensitiveness of parts. BJBrnstrBm's a., an apparatus for determining the sensitiveness of the skin. Boas' a., an instrument for determining the sensitiveness over the epigastrium. • algesiometer (al-je-se-om'et-er). Same as algesimeter.
  26. algetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      algetic (al-jet'-ik) [ftXytTr, to have pain]. Pertaining to, or producing, pain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      algetic (al-jet'ik). Painful.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      algetic. Painful.
  27. alisphenoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alisphenoid (ol-is-fl'-noid) [ola, a wing; sphenoid], I. Pertaining to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. 3. The bone that in adult life forms the main portion of the greater wing of the sphenoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alisphenoid (al-i-sfe'noyd) [L. ala. wing, + sphenoid.] Relating to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone. a. car'tilage, the cartilage in the embryo from which the greater wing of the sphenoid bone is developed.
  28. alkalescence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alkalescence (al-ka-les'-ens) [Ar., al-iialiy, sodaash). Slicht or commencing alkalinity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alkalescence (al-kal-es'ens). i. A slight alkalinity. 2. The process of becoming alkaline.
  29. alkarsin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alkarsin (al-kar'-sin) {alcohol; arsenic}, "Cadet's fuming liquid"; an extremely poisonous liquid containing cacodyl. It is of a brown color, and on exposure to the air ignites spontaneously.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alkar'sin. Alcarsin.
  30. allelomorphism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      allelomorphism (al-el-o-moKfizm). The existence or the transmission of allelomorphic characters.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      allelomorphism (al'e-lo-morTizm). The transmission by heredity of allelomorphic characters.
  31. allochiria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      allochiria (al-o-ki'-re-ah) [dXXot. other; x«4>, hand]. An infrequent tabetic symptom, in which, if one extremity be pricked, the patient locates the sensation in the corresponding member of the other side.
  32. allochroic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      allochroic (al-lo-kro'-ik) [dXXot. another; color). Of changeable or diversified color.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      allochroic (al-o-kro'ik) [G. attochroos, changed in color.] Changed or changeable in color; relating to allochroism.
  33. aloetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aloetic (al-o-el'-ik) [aloes]. Containing or pertaining to aloes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aloetic (al-o-et'ik) [L. alocficus]. 1. Pertaining to or containing aloes. 2. A preparation containing aloes.
  34. alpha-naphthol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alpha-naphthol (al-fah-naf'thol). A non-offidal variety of naphthol. See naphthol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alpha-naphthol (al-fah-naf'thol). A non-official variety of naphthol. Sec naphthol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alpha-naph'thol. A substance obtained from coaltar and prepared artificially, a colorless crystalline powder; employed as an intestinal antiseptic in typhoid fever and other conditions in doses of gr. 10-15 (0-6—r.o), also externally in oily solution, in scarlet fever, erysipelas, and smallpox.
  35. alphitomorphous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alphitomorphous (al"fit-o-mor'fus) [Gr. aWi/n-ror barley-meal 4- uopform]. Having a mealy appearance: said of certain fungous parasites.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alphitomorphous (.il"lit-o-mor'fus) [Gr. &\barley-meal + Mform]. Having a mealy appearance: said of certain fungous parasites.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alphitomorphous (al-fi-to-mor'fus) [G. alphiton.
  36. aluminosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aluminosis (al-u-min-o'-sus) {alum; *txrm. disease]. A chronic catarrhal inflammation of the lungs found in pottery workers.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alumino'sis. A chronic catarrhal affection of the respiratory passages occurring in workers in alum.
  37. alvine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alvine (oZ'-tin or al'-vin) [alrus, belly]. Pertaining to the belly, a. concretion, an intestinal calculus, a. dejections, a. discharges, the feces. a. obstruction, constipation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alvine (al'vin) [L. alvi'nus]. Pertaining to the belly or intestines.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      al'vine. Pertaining to the alxlomen or to the intestines; said especially of evacuations from the latter. I Lat., alvinus.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alvine (al'vln) [L. aln'nus]. Pertaining to the belly or intestines.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alvine (al'vln) [L. alvus, belly.] Relating to the abdomen or the intestine.
  38. alypin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alypin (al'-*-pin). The hydrochloride of tetramethyl-diamino-dimethyl-ethyl-carbinol-benzpate. It is a synthetic preparation, similar to cocaine and stovaine, and is used as a local anesthetic. It is less toxic than cocaine. For the eye and urethra, a 2 per cent stolution is used; elsewhere, a stronger solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alypin (al-i'pin). A glycerin derivative, C|„Hj,Ojhjnci, used as a local anesthetic, especially in eye operations. Locally it is used in a 10 per cent, solution; for the eye, in 1 to 2 per cent, solution, and hypodermicatly, in 1 to 4 per cent, solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alypin (al-i'pin). A glycerin derivative, C<«H%r ' used as a local anesthetic, especially in
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alypin (al'I-pin). A synthetic crystalline powder soluble in water and alcohol; a local anesthetic, similar to, but less toxic than cocaine; used in 0.5-2 per cent, solutions; is not mydriatic. Chemically it is benzoyltetramethyl-diaminoethyl-dimethyl-carbinol hydrochloride.
  39. amadou - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amadou (fim'-a-dno) [Fr., amadouer, to coax]. German tinder or touchwood; Boletus igr.iarius, a fungus found on old tree-trunks, used to stanch local hemorrhage and as a dressing for wounds, etc. a. de Panama, a hemostatic prepared from the leafhairs of Micronia mucronata.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amadou (am'ah-doo) [FrJ. Touchwood or punk; the fungus Bole'lits ignia'rius which grows on old trees, and is used as a wound dressing and as a hemostatic, sheet a., a preparation of amadou used as a dressing for bed-sores.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      amadou (ah'mah-du). Touchwood, punk, spunk, tinder, oak agaric; obtained from Folyporus igniarius and other species of Polyporus; formerly much used as a hemostatic application and occasionally for the protection of abraded surfaces. [Fr.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amadou (am'ah-doo) [Fr.]. Touchwood or punk; the fungus BoUftus ignia'rius. which grows on old trees, and is used as a wound dressing and as a hcmostatic. sheet a., a preparation of amadou used as a dressing for bed-sores.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amadou (am'a-doo) [Fr. amadouer, to coax.] A substance derived from fungi, Boletus igniarius, Polyporus jommtarius, and other varieties, found growing on tree-trunks; used as a hemostatic and, when impregnated with saltpeter, as punk.
  40. amaril - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amaril (am'-ar-il) [Sp.. amarillo, yellow]. The poison induced by Bacillus icteroides.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amaril (am'ar-il) [Sp. amoril'io yellow]. The iwison generated by the Bacil'lus icleroi'des, and believed to be active in inducing yellow fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amaril (am'ar-il) [Sp. amaril'la yellow]. The poison generated by the Bacil'lus icteroi'des, and believed to be active in inducing yellow fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      am'aril [Sp. amarilio, yellow.] The toxin of Sanarelli's bacillus, B. icterodes, at one time asserted to be the specific organism of yellow fever.
  41. amarum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amarum (am-a'-rum) [see amara]. i. A bitter. 2. Magnesium sulphate, a., genuine, magnesium sulphate, a. purum, any simple bitter.
  42. amasthenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amasthenic (am-a$-then'-ik) [&ua, together; otitrot. strength]. I'niung the chemical rays of light in a focus, ;r- a lens.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amasthenic (am-as-then'ik) [Gr. 4p.a together + aBivot strength]. Bringing the chemic rays of light into one focus: said of a lens.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amasthenic (am-as-then'ik) [Gr. 4/ia together -faBiros strength). Bringing the chemic rays of light into one focus: said of a lens.
  43. amazia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amazia (ah-ma1-zc-ah) \a, priv.; jjajv*. the breast]. Congenital absence of the mammary gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amazia (ah-ma'ze-ah) [Gr. a priv. -f ua^os breast]. Congenital absence of the mammary gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amazia (ah-ma'ze-ah) [Gr. a priv. + /«n'6v breast]. Congenital absence of the mammary gland.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amazia (a-ma'zl-ah) [G. o- priv. + mazos, breast.] Absence of breasts, amastia.
  44. amblyoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amblyoscope (am'-bU-os-kfp) [amblyopia; canrilr, to look). An instrument by means of which an amblyopic eye is trained to take its share in vision.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amblyoscope (am'ble-o-skop) [amblyopia + manctl to view]. An instrument for training an am blyopic eye to take part in vision.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amblyoscope (am'ble-o-skop) [amblyopia -I «M>.ti.'.c to view]. An instrument for training an amblyopic eye to take part in vision.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amblyoscope (am'ble-o-skop) [amblyo(pia), + G. skoped, I regard.] An instrument resembling a stereoscope, used in training the fusion sense, and habituating an amblyopic eye to bear its share of vision.
  45. ambon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ambon (am'-bon) [A^uc, the Up of a cup]. The fibrocartilaginous ring that surrounds a socket in which the head of a large bone is received, such as the acetabulum, or the glenoid cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ambon (am'bon). The edge of the sockets in which the heads of long bones are lodged.
  46. ambustion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ambustion (am-bus'-chun) [ambustio, a bum]. A burn or scald.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ambustion (am-bust'yun). A burn or scald.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ambustion (am-bus'chun) [L. amburere, to scorch.] A burn or scald.
  47. ametropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ametropic (ah-met-rop'-ik) [see ametropia}. Affected with or pertaining to ametropia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ametropic (am-et-rop'ik). Affected with or pertaining to ametropia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ametropic (am-et-rop'ik). Affected with or pertaining to ametropia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ametro'pic. Relating to, or suffering from, ametropia.
  48. amido- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amido- (am'-id-o). A prefix denoting a chemical compound containing the univalent radical NHj.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amido-. A prefix in chemic names, indicating that the substance represented by the latter part of the name is modified by the substitution of the radical NH3 for hydrogen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amido-. A prefix in chemic names, indicating that the substance represented by the latter part of the name is modified by the substitution of the radical Mi, for hydrogen.
  49. amidogen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amidogen (am-id'-o-jen) [amide; yert>iiv, to produce]. The hypothetical univalent radical, NHi, replacing one atom of H in ami do-compounds. See amide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amidogen (am'id-o-jen). The hypothetic radical, NHJt found in amido-compounds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amidogen (aml-do-jen) [amido- + G. gennao, I produce.] The hypothetical univalent radical NH,, replacing a hydrogen atom in an amidocom pound.
  50. amidulin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amidulin (am-id'-u-lin) (see amidine]. Soluble starch; prepared by the action of H?SO* on starch, thus removing the starch-cellulose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amidulin (am-id'u-lin). The granulose of starch freed from its envelop of amyloccllulose by the action of hydrochloric acid; soluble starch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amidulin (am-id'u-lin). The granulose of starch freed from its envelop of amylocellulose by the action of hydrochloric acid; soluble starch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amid'ulin [Fr. amidon, starch.] Soluble starch, so rendered by boiling or treating with hydrochloric acid.
  51. amitosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amitosis (ah-mit-o'-sis) [A, priv.; utm, a thread). Cell-multiplication by direct division or simple cleavage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amitosis (am-it-o'sis) [Gr. a priv. + juros thread Direct cell division; cell division by simple cleavagi
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amitosis (am-it^o'sis) [Gr. a priv. + litres thread]. Direct cell division; cell division by simple cleavage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amitosis (am-i-to'sis) [G. a- priv. + mitosis.] Direct division of the nucleus and cell, without the complicated changes in the former which occur in the ordinary process of cell reproduction.
  52. amitotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amitotic (ah-mit-ot'-ik) [see amifonil. Of the nature of, or characterized by, amitosis. a. celldivision, direct cell-division, as distinguished from karyokinesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amitotic (am-it-ot'ik). Of the nature of amito-i not occurring by karyokinesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amitotic (am-it-ot'ik). Of the nature of amitosis; not occurring by karyokinesis.
  53. ammoniacum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ammoniacum (am-o-ni'-ak-um) [ammonia]. Ammoniac. A gum obtained from a Persian plant, Dorema ammoniacum. It is a stimulating expectorant and laxative, resembling asafetlda, employed in chronic bronchial affections. Dose 10-30 gr. (0.65-2.0 Gm ammoniac! cum hydrargyro,
  54. ammonio- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ammonio-. A prefix indicating combination with ammonium, a.-ferric sulphate. See under iron. a.-silver nitrate albuminose. See ktgonon.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ammonio-. A prefix denoting ammoniated.
  55. amorpha - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amorpha (ah-morf-ah) [4. priv.; uop&i, shape].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amorpha (ah-mor'fah) [Gr. a neg. 4- uoptpfi form]. Diseases that evince no definite pathologic changes.
  56. amorphus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amorphus (ah-mor'-fus) [4. priv.; pop^4, a form]. An acardiacus without head or extremities. See also anideus. a. globulus, see anideus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amor'phus. An acardiac monster without limbs or other recognizable features.
  57. amphiarthrodial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphiarthrodial (am-fe-ar-thro'-de-al). Relating, to amphiarthrosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphiarthro'dial. Relating to amphiarthrosis.
  58. amphiaster - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphiaster (am'-ft-as-Jar) [amphi-; iun^p, a star]. The figure formed in indirect cell^division by the achromatin threads and chromatin granules united to form the socalled nuclear spindle, together with the threads of cell-protoplasm radiating from a rounded clear space at each end of the spindle, known as the stars or suns.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphias'ter [G. amphi, on both sides, + aster, star.] The double star, a figure formed of the chromatin of the nucleus during mitosis.
  59. amphibolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphibolia (am-fe-bo'-lt-ah) [iM*i0<Ain. uncertainty). The vacillating period of a fever or disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphibolia [G. uncertainty.] A stage in the course of a disease in which the outcome appears uncertain.
  60. amphibolic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphibolic (am-fe-bol'-ik) [see amphibolial. Uncertain; doubtful. Applied to a period in the febrile process occurring between the fastigium and the defervescence, and marked by exacerbations and remissions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphibol'ic [G. amphibolos, doubtful.] Ambiguous, uncertain, a. fis'tula, see fistula, a. pe'riod or stage, the critical period of a disease when the outcome is uncertain.
  61. amphoric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphoric (am-for'-ik) [amphora, a vase with two handles]. Resembling the sound produced by blowing across the mouth of a bottle, a. breathing, breath-sounds with musical quality heard in diseased conditions of the lung, especially in pulmonary tuberculosis with cavity-formation, a. resonance. In auscultation, a metallic sound like that of blowing Into a bottle, caused by the reverberation of sound In a cavity of the lung. a. respiration, see a. breaking.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      amphor'ic. 1. Resembling the sound produced by blowing across the mouth of a bottle (said of auscultatory sounds). 2. Tympanitic and of a metallic character (said of percussion sounds). [Lat., amphora, jar.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphor'ic [L. amphora, a jar.] Noting the sound made by blowing across the mouth of a bottle, a. res'onance, cavernous resonance; a hollow sound obtained by percussing over a pulmonary cavity, the pitch depending upon the size of the cavity. a. respira'tion, a blowing respiratory sound heard on ausculatation over a pulmonary cavity, a. voice, a. whis'per, a sound having a hollow, blowing character heard on auscultation over a pulmonary cavity when the patient speaks or whispers.
  62. amphoricity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphoricity (am-for-is'-i-te') [amphoric]. The quality of being amphoric; the giving forth of amphoric sounds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphoricity (am-for-isl-tl). A condition in which amphoric sounds are obtained on auscultation or percussion.
  63. ampullar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ampullar (am-pul'ar). Pertaining to an ampulla, ampullitis (am-pul-i'tis). Inflammation of an ampulla, especially the ampulla of Henle.
  64. amyelia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyelia (ah-mi-e'-le-ah) [4, priv.; itvitJn. marrow]. Congenital absence of the spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyelia (am"i-el'I-ah) [G. a- priv. + myelos, marrow.] Absence of the spinal cord.
  65. amyelotrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyelotrophy (ah-mi-el-ot'-ro-fe) [4, priv.; uoM*, marrow; rpo^ii, nourishment]. Atrophy of the spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyelotrophy (a-mi-el-ot'ro-fl). Myelatrophy.
  66. amyelous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyelous (ah-mi'-el-us). See amyelic. amytlus (ah-mi'-el-us) [4, priv.; piMXfa, marrow]. A fetal monstrosity with partial or complete absence of the spinal cord.
  67. amygdaline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amygdaline (am-ig'-dal-ln) [see amygdala]. I. Almond-like. 2. Pertaining to the tonsil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amygdaline (a-mig'dah-len, or 1m). i. Relating to an almond. 2. Relating to a tonsil, especially to the brain structure called amygdala or amygdaloid nucleus, a. fis'sure, incisura temporalis, a fissure on the ventral aspect of the temporal lobe near its pole.
  68. amygdalitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dul-i'-tis} [amygdala; tru, inflammation]. Tonsillitis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dal-i'tis). Any inflammation of the tonsil. [Gr., amygdale, almond (popular term for tonsil), + itis, inflammation.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dal-i'(e')tis) [G. amygdali, tonsil, + -itis.] Tonsillitis, inflammation of a tonsil.
  69. amylamine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amylamine (.am-il'-am-in). See isoamylamine. a. hydrochlorate, CiHuNCl, a reaction-product of amyl cyanate, potassium hydrate, and hydrochloric acid, occurring as deliquescent scales or crystals. It is an antipyretic. Dose 7-15 gr. (0.45-1.0 Gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amylamine (am-il-am'en). i. A colorless liquid, CsHnNHi, obtained in various ways, found sometimes in codliver oil. 2. One of a series of amino-compounds of amyl, in which one or more atoms of H in the ammonia are replaced by a corresponding number of molecules of the amyl radical.
  70. amylobacter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amylobacter (am-il-o-bak'-tur) [AjitiXoy. starch; 0aKTrjpu>t>, a little rod], A genus of schizomycetes characterized by a period of development to which it contains starch in its interior.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      am"ylobac'ter. A bacterial organism containing starch.
  71. amylolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amylolysis (am-il-ol'-is-is) [AfivXor, starch; Xtfwit, solution]. The digestion of starch, or its conversion into sugar.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amylol'ysis [G. amylon, starch, + lysis, solution.] The change of starch into sugar.
  72. amyosthenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyosthenic (am-i-o-sthen'-ik) [A, priv.; Mj't. muscle; (rt»<*o», force]. Pertaining to amyosthenia. Also, a medicine or agent depressing muscular action.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyosthen'ic. Relating to or causing muscular weakness.
  73. amyotrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyotrophy (am-i-ot'-ro-fe). See amyotrophia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyotrophy (am-i-ot'ro-fl) [G. a- priv. + mys(myo-), muscle, + trophe, nourishment.] Muscular wasting or atrophy, progressive spi'nal a., progressive muscular atrophy.*
  74. amyxorrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyxorrhea (am-iks-o-re1'-ah) [A, priv.; nv£a, mucus; fata, flow]. Absence of the normal mucous secretion.
  75. anabatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anabatic (an-ab-at'-ik) (see anabasis]. Increasing;' growing more intense; as the anabatic stage of a fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anabatic (an-ab-at'ik) [Gr. ATMj<n iW,.|. Increasing or growing more intense.
  76. anabiotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anabiotic (an-ab~i-ol'-ik) [Ai-A, again; 0i«4t. life). I. Relating to anabiosis. 3. Restoring the strength or activity.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anabiot'ic. Apparently lifeless, but capable of living.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anabiotic (an-ah-bi-ot'ik). Lifeless, but still capable of living.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anabiot'ic. i. Resuscitating, restorative, i. Arevivifying remedy, a powerful stimulant.
  77. anabrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anabrosis (an-ab-ro'-sis) [AvA&wcm, an eating up]. Corrosion, or superficial ulceration.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anabrosis (an-ab-ro'sis) [Gr.]. Ulceration or erosion of the surface.
  78. anacamptic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anacamptic (an-ah-kamp'-tik) [see anacampsis]. Reflected, as sound or light; pertaining to or causing a reflection.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anacamptic (an-a-kamp'tik). Pertaining to reflection, as of sound or light.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anacamp'tic. In optics or acoustics, reflecting or reflected.
  79. anacathartic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anacathartic (an-ak-alh~arr-tik) [AfA, up; purgation), i. Causing anacatharsis. 2. An expectorant, emetic, or sternutatory drug or agent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anacathar'tic. Causing anacatharsis; emetic.
  80. anacrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anacrotic (an-ak-rot'-ih) [afa, up; icpimx, a stroke]. Relating to or characterized by anacrotism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anacrot'ic. Anadicrotic.
  81. anacrotism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anacrotism (an-ak'-ro-tizm) [see anacrotic]. The condiiion in which there is one or more notches on the ascending limb of the pulse-curve.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anacrotism (an-ak'rot-izm) [Gr. Ai>& up + uptrot stroke). The existence of two or more expansions of an artery in one beat, the lesser expansion taking place before the principal one. The condition is seen in hypertrophy and dilatation of the left ventricle, after ligation of an artery, in diminished velocity of blood-current, etc.
  82. anadicrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anadicrotic (an-ah-di-krot'-ik) [ApA, up; 6tt, twice; icp6rof, a stroke). Characterized by anadicrotism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anadicrotic (an-ah-di-krot'ik) [G. ana, up, + dikrotos, double beating.] Noting a sphygmographic tracing in which two beats are marked on the ascending line.
  83. anaerobiosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anaerobiosis (an-a-er-o-bi-o'-sis) [see anaerobia]. Life sustained in the absence of free oxygen; the power of living where there is no free oxygen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anaerobiosis (an-a-er-o-bi-o'sis). Existence in an oxygen-free atmosphere.
  84. anaerophyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anaerophyte (an-a'~e-ro-fit) [&?, priv.; &jip, air: 0rrni', a plant]. In biology, a plant capable of living without a direct supply of oxygen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anaerophyte (an-a'er-o-fit) [G. an- priv. + air, air, -i- fhyton, plant.] i. A plant which grows without air. 2. An anaerobic bacterium.
  85. anagraph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anagraph (an'-a-graf) [dra-ypa^, a writing out]. A physician's prescription or recipe.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'agraph [G. anagrafhl, a writing out.] Prescription.
  86. analgetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      analgetic (an-al-jt'-tik). See analgesic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      analget'ic. Analgesic, i. Causing analgesia or freedom from pain. 2. A pain-stilling remedy.
  87. analgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      analgic (an-al'-jik) [see analgen]. Analgesic. " L (an-al'-jin). Synonym of creolin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      analgic (an-al'jik). Insensible to pain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anal'gic. Without pain.
  88. anapeiratic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anapeiratic {on-ap-i-rat'~ik) ... to do agiin]. A condition due to excessive exercise, as in writers' cramp.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anapeiratic (an-ah-pi-rat'ik) [Gr. &vaweipaa9ai to do again]. Due to excessive use.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anapeiratic (an"ah-pi-rat'ik) [G. anafeiraomai, I try again.] Resulting from overuse, noting certain occupation neuroses.
  89. anaphrodisia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anaphrodisia (an-af-ro-diz'-f-ah) [Ap, priv.; *A£poll-i. Venus]. Absence or impairment of sexual appetite.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anaphrodisia (an-af-ro-diz'e-ah). Absence or loss of sexual feeling. [Gr., an. priv., + Aphrodite. Venus.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anaphrodisia (an"af-ro-diz'e-ah) [Gr. &v priv. + '\(ppo&inj Venus]. Absence or loss of sexual desire.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anaphrodisia (an-afro-diz'I-ah) [G. insensibility to love, from an- priv. + Aphrodite, the goddess of love.] Absence of sexual feeling.
  90. anaplasty - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anaplasty (an'-ap-las-ft). An operation for the restoration of lost parts; plastic surgery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anaplasty (an'ap-la^te) [Gr. 4*4 again + -r^iutaav to form]. Restorative or plastic surgery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'aplasty [G. ana, again, + plasso, I form.] Plastic surgery; the surgical restoration of lost or defective parts by transplantation of tissue.
  91. anaplerosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anaplerosis (an-ap-le-ro'-sis) [tui, up; TXi)p6tu>, to fill]. The restoration or repair of a wound, sore, or lesion in which there has been a loss of substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anaplerosis (an-ap-le-ro'sis). The repair or replacement of lost or defective parts.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anaplero'sis [G. anaplSro, I fill up.] The form of plastic surgery which consists in the transplantation of tissue to fill a defect resulting from injury or disease.
  92. anapnometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anapnom'eter [G. anapnol, respiration, + metron, measure.] Spirometer; an instrument for measuring the force of the respiratory movements.
  93. anapophysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anapophysis (an-a-pof'is-is). The accessory process of a lumbar vertebra, a small process, pointing downward, situated behind the base of the transverse process and corresponding to the inferior tubercle of the transverse process of a dorsal vertebra. [Gr., ana, up, + apophysis, offshoot.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anapophysis (an-ap-of'is-is) [Gr. Afd back + airo^iwiv offshoot). An accessory vertebral process; especially an accessory process of a dorsal or lumbar vertebra.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anapophysis (an-a-pof'i-sis) [G. ana back, + apophysis, offshoot.] An accessory spinal process of a vertebra, found especially in the thoracic or lumbar vertebra;.
  94. anarthria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anarthria (an-ar'-thre-ah) [&t>. priv.; 'ipdpo*. articulation), i. Defective articulation. 2. Absence of vigor. 3. Without joints, a. centralis, partial aphasia duet ocentral lesion, a. literalis, stammering.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anar'thria [G. an- priv. + arihron, articulation.] The loss of power of articulate speech.
  95. anasarcous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anasarcous (an-ah-sar'-kus) [see anasarca]. Affected with anasarca.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anasarcous (an-ah-sar'kus). Affected with or of the nature of anasarca.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anasar'cous. Dropsical; marked by anasarca.
  96. anastaltic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anastaltic (an-as-tal'-tik) [dvcurraXrucAi. checking; putting back], i. Strongly astringent. 2. Centripetal ; afferent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anastaltic (an-as-tal'tik) [Gr. dva<rraXTix6s contracting), i. Highly astringent; styptic. 2. A styptic medicine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anastal'tic [G. anastaltikos, capable of checking.] i. Astringent. 2. An astringent or styptic remedy. 3. Antiperistaltic.
  97. anastate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anastate (an'-as-Uf) [ivitrraroi. caused to rise]. Any substance that appears in or is characteristic of an anabolic process.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anastate (an'as-tat) [Gr. Ariarant raised up). Any substance or condition characteristic of or resulting from an anabolic process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anastate (an'as-tat) [G. anastatos, made to rise.] Any product of anabolism.
  98. anat - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anat. Abbreviation for anatomy or anatomic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anat. Abbreviation for anatomy or anatomic.
  99. anatriptic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anatriptic (an-at-rip'-tik) [see anotripsis}. A medicine to be applied by rubbing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anatriptic (an-at-rip'tik) [Gr. avdrptirrof rubbed up]. A medicine applied by rubbing.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anatrip'tic [G. anatrtptos, rubbed up.] A remedy to be applied by friction or inunction.
  100. anchusin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anchusin (an-ku'sin). A red coloring-matter, CMH,0O.s, from alkanet root.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anchusin (an-ku'sin). A red coloring-matter, ('Hi! from alkanet root.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anchusin (anTcu-sin). Alkanin, red coloring matter from the root of Anchusa, or Alkanna, tinctoria. a. pa'per, alkanin* paper.
  101. anchylosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anchylosis (ang-kil-o'-sis). See ankylosis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anchylosis. Sec ankylosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anchylosis. Incorrect form of ankylosis.
  102. ancistroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ancistroid (an-sis'troid) [Gr. aymoTpov a fishhook + tliot form]. Hook shaped.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ancistroid (an-sis'troid) [Gr. ayxiarpov a fishhook + tloot form]. Hook shaped.
  103. anconagra - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anconagra (ang-kon-a'-gratfi [dvic&w, the elbow. 47pn, a seizure]. Arthritic pain at the elbow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anconagra (an-kon-ag'rah. an-kon'ag-rah) [Gr. AyKwv elbow -\- &ypa seizure], (jout of the elbow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anconagra (an-kon-ag'rah, an-kon'ag-rah) [Gr. iytiav elbow -f- typo, seizure]. Gout of the elbow.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anconagra (ang-ko-nag'rah) [G. ankdn, elbow, + agra, a seizure.] Gout in the elbow.
  104. anconeus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anconeus (ang-ko-nf'-us). See under muscle. anconoid (ans'-kon-oid) [d-yxwr, the elbow]. Resembling the elbow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anconeus (an-ko'ne-us). See muscles, table of.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anconeus (an-co'ne-us). See table of mus■ cles, under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anconeus (an-ko'ne-us). See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anco'neus [G. ankdn, elbow.] A short muscle with origin from the external condyle of the humerus and insertion into the olecranon and the upper fourth of the shaft of the ulna.
  105. anconitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anconitis (an-ko-ni'tis). Inflammation of the elbow-joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anconitis (an-ko-ni'tis). Inflammation of the elbow-joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anconitis (ang-ko-ni'(ne')tis) [G. ankdn, elbow, +
  106. ancyroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ancyroid (an'sir-oid) [Gr. iyxvpa anchor + elSos form]. Shaped like an anchor or hook.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ancyroid (an'sir-oid) [Gr. Hynvpa anchor -f «ljos form). Shaped like an anchor or hook.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'cyroid [G. ankyra, anchor, + eidos, resemblance.] Ankyroid, shaped like the fluke of an anchor, noting the cornua of the lateral ventricles of the brain and the coracoid process of the scapula.
  107. androgynus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      androgynus (an-droj'-in-us) *see androgyna]. A hermaphrodite. A male with genital organs similar to those of the female.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      androgynus (an-droj'en-us) [Gr. ia^p man + ywit woman]. A hermaphrodite: also an effeminate man.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      androgynus (an-droj'i-nus) [G. anSr, a man, + gyne, a, woman.] An hermaphrodite.
  108. anelectric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anelectric (an-el-ek'-trik) [Ac, priv.; ^Xurrpoi', amber], i. Readily giving up electricity. 2. A good conductor; a substance which readily parts with electricity.
  109. anelectrode - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anelectrode (an-el-ek'-trCd) [d»-A, upward; electrode]. The positive pole of a galvanic battery; anode.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anelectrode (an-el-ek'trod) [Gr. dfd up -f electrode]. The positive pole of a galvanic battery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anelec'trode. Anode.
  110. anelectrotonic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anelectrotonic (an-el-ek-tro-ton'-ik) \hr, priv.; {Xctcrpac, electricity; j i.,..,, tension]. Relating to anelectrotonus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anelectroton'ic. Relating to anelectrotonus.
  111. anelectrotonus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anelectrotonus (an-el-ek-trot'-o-nus) [see anelectrotonic}. The decreased irritability that is present in a nerve in the neighborhood of the anode.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anelectrotonus (an"el-ek-trot'o-nus) [Gr. ea>t. up -4- clectrotonus]. Lessened irritability of a nerve in the region of the positive pole or anode during . the passage of an electric current.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anelectrot'onus [anelfctrode + G. tonos, tension.] The lessened irritability and conductivity of a nerve in the neighborhood of the anode, during the passage of an electric current through it.
  112. anemonin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anemonin (an-tm'-o-nin} [see anemone}, CuHiiOe. The active principle of the anemone. It ia given in bronchitis, asthma, and spasmodic cough. Dose 1-} gr. (0.016-0.048 Gm.) twice daily.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anemonin (an-em'on-in). The active principle of Anem'one pulsatU'la, a colorless crystalline substance, C,5H130,. It is used as an antispasmodic and sedative in asthma, bronchitis, whoopingcough, etc., and as an anodyne in dysmenorrhea, epididymitis, etc. Dose, l—J gr. (0.02-0.05 gm.).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anem'onin. A poisonous crystalline substance. GcHi=O«, obtained from the leaves and flowers of several species of Anemone. It is volatile and has a burning, aromatic taste like that of pepper. It has been used in whooping-cough, bronchitis, and asthma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anem'onin. Pulsatilla camphor, a white crystalline principle obtained from Anemone pulsalilla; employed in orchitis and epididymitis, asthma, whooping cough, and bronchitis, in doses of gr. A-i'i (0.001-0.005).
  113. anencephalous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anencephalous (an-en-sef'al-us). Having no brain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anenceph'alous. Anencephalic.
  114. anenterous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anenterous (an-en'-ter-us) [to, priv.; Ixrepor, intestine]. In biology, having no intestine, as a tapeworm or a fluke.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anen'terous [G. an- priv. + enlera, intestines.] Having no intestine, noting certain parasites.
  115. anepiploic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anepiploic (an-ep-ip-lo'-ik) [to, priv.; MirXoov, the caul]. Having no epiploon or omentum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anepiploic (an-ep-e-plo'ik). Devoid of omentum.
  116. anethene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      an'ethene. A hydrocarbon, CioHw, found in oil of dill.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anethene (an'eth-«n). A hydrocarbon, C10H,,, from oil of dill.
  117. anethol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anethol (an'eth-ol) [Gr. tanftov anise]. Methylallylphenol, CwH,jO, a white, fragrant solid or liquid, from the oil of fennel and of anise. It is a pleasant carminative and an antiseptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ane'thol (N.F.). Paramethoxypropenylbenzene, anise camphor, a derivative of fennel and anise oils; a colorless liquid at temperatures above 23° C. (73.4° P.), below 20° C. (68° F.) a white glistening camphor-like mass; employed as a flavoring substance in doses of 152-4 (o. 130.26).
  118. anginophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anginophobia (an-ji-no-fo'-be-ah) [angina; $60fear]. Morbid fear of angina pectoris.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anginophobia (an-jin-o-fo'be-ah) [angina -+■ Gr. i^orfos fear]. Morbid dread of angina pectoris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anginopho'bia [angina + G. phobos, fear.] Extreme fear of an attack of angina pectoris.
  119. angioneurosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angioneurosis (an-je-o-n&-ro'-sis) [ang«o-; neurosis], A neurosis of the blood-vessels; a disturbance of the
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angioneurosis (an"je-o-nu-ro'sis) [Gr. 477neurosis). Any neurosis affecting primarily the blood-vessels; a disorder of the vasomotor system, as angiospasm, angioparesis, or angioparalysis.
  120. angioneurotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angioneurotic (an-je-o-n&-rolf-ik) [see angioneurosi;]. Pertaining to angio neurosis, a. edema, an acute circumscribed swelling of the subcutaneous or submucous tissues, probably due to vasomotor lesion. The disease often runs In families. It is at times periodic, and is associated with colic and gastric disturbances.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angioneurotic (an"je-o-nu-rot'ik). Caused by or of the nature of an angioneurosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'gioneurot'ic. Relating to an angioneurosis.
  121. angioscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angioscope (an'-je-o-skdp) [angio-; Vkovw. to Inspect]. An instrument for examining the capillary vessels.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'gioscope. A modified microscope for studying the capillary vessels.
  122. angiospasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angiospasm (an'-jc-o-spazm) [angio-; anao^iAs, a fipasmj. A vasomotor spasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'giospasm [G. angeion, vessel, + spasmos, tension.] A condition of spasmodic, contraction of the muscular coats of the smaller arteries, causing an increase in blood-pressure; angiohypertonus.
  123. angiotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angiotomy (an-jc-ot'-o-mt) [see angiolomc\. i. Incision into a vessel. 2. That branch of anatomy relating to the vascular system.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angiotomy (an-je-ot'om-e) [Gr. iyytiov vessel H Tout) a cutting]. The dissection of the blood-vessel:
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      angiotomy (an-je-ot'o-me). i. Section of an artery or vein. 2. Dissection of the blood vessels or lymphatics. [Gr., aggeion, a vessel, + tome, a cut.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      angiot'omy [G. angeion, vessel, + tomi, cutting.] i. Section of an artery or vein. 2. Anatomy of the blood-vessels and lymphatics.
  124. angitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angitis (an-ji'-lis). See angiitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angitis (an-ji'tis). Same as angiitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      angitis (an-ji'(je')tis). Angiitis.
  125. angustura - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angustura. See angoslura.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angustura (ang-us-tu'rah) [Sp. Angostura, "narrows," a town of Venezuela]. The bark of Galipr'n cuspa'ria, a tree of South America. It is a bitter tonic and stimulant: used in dysentery
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      angustu'ra. Angostura.
  126. anios - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anios (an'e-os). A proprietary greenish liquid, us as an antiseptic and disinfectant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anios (ant-os). Trade name of a preparation of formaldehyde with phenol, used as an antiseptic.
  127. anisate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anisate (an'-is-at) [anisum, anise]. A salt of anisic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anisate (an'is-at). A salt of anisic acid. 1 anisates are antiseptics and antipyretics.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'isate. i. A salt of anisic acid, usually possessing antiseptic properties, a. To flavor with anise.
  128. anisum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anisum (an'-is-um) [L.]. Anise. The fruit of Pimpinella anisum. Its properties are due to a volatile oil. It is slightly stimulant to the heart action. It liquefies bronchial secretions, and is therefore a favorite ingredient in cough-mixtures. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.65-1.3 Gm.). anisi, aqua (U. S. P.). oil of anise, i; water, 500 parts. Dose indefinite, anisi, essentia (B. P.). Dose 10-20 min. (0.6-1.2 Cc.). anisi, oleum (U. S. P.), an ingredient in tinctura opii camphorata. Dose 1-5 min. (0.06-0.3 Gm.). anisi, spiritus (U. S. P.), a 10 % solution of the oil in alcohol. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anisum (an-i'sum), gen. ani'si. Latin for anise.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ani'sum (U.S.), ani'si fruc'tus (Br.) [G. anison, anise, dill.] Anise, the fruit of Pimpinella anisum; aromatic and carminative. The aqua, oleum, and spiritus are official.
  129. ankylostomiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ankylostomiasis (ang-kil-os-io-mi'-as-is) [see . 1 nkylostoma}. The morbid condition produced by the presence of the parasite A nkylosloma duodenale in the human intestine. It is especially prevalent among brickmakers and other workmen in Europe. Syn., dochmiasis; brickmakers' anemia; tunnel anemia; miners' cochexia; Egyptian chlorosis; undnariasis; hookworm disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ankylostomiasis (ang"kil-os-to-mi'as-is). A disease not unlike idiopathic anemia, due to the presence in the intestine of a nematode worm, Ankylos'toma duodena'lr, Uncina'ria america'na' or other species, which sucks the blood from the duodenal walls. The disease is marked by profound anemia, oligochromemia, and eosinophilia. The disease occurs chiefly in brickmakers, miners, and navvies. Called also dochmiasis, uncinariasis, hookworm disease, miners7 anemia. St. Gothtird's tunnel disease, tunnel-anemia, Egyptian chlorosis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ankylostomiasis (ang-kil-os-to-mi'as-is). Syn.: uncinariasis, dochmiasis, hoohvorin disease, miner's anemia, tropical chlorosis. A toxemia resulting in a progressive anemia, caused by Ankyiostoma duodenale and Nccator americanus. I'resent in the tropics and the lower temperate zone of America, Africa, and Asia. Caused probably by a toxin set free by embryos in pasing from skin to intestine. These embryos enter the skin through a papular or vesicular dermatitis, called "bunches" or "ground itch." The principal symptoms are local dermatitis of the feet, eosinophilia, anemia, debility, pallor, and edema. [Gr., agkylos, crooked, + stoma, mouth.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ankylostomi'asis. Uncinariasis,* ancylostomiasis, dochmiasis, hookworm disease, tunnel-anemia, miner's anemia, Egyptian chlorosis, St. Gothard disease.
  130. ankyroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ankyroid (ang'-kir-oid) [Sr«/0a. a hook]. Hookehaped. a. cavity, in the brain, the posterior or descending cornu of the lateral ventricle, a. process, the coracoid process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ankyroid (ang'ki-royd) [G. ankyra, hook, + eidos, shape.] Hook-shaped.
  131. anlage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anlage (ahn-lahg-th) [German]. PI. anlagen or anlages. I. The primitive undifferentiated mass of cells or rudiment of a part in a developing embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anlage (ahn'lah-gheh) [German.] Proton, primordium.
  132. annotto - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      annotto (an-ot'-o) [native American]. A coloringmatter obtained from the pellicles of the seeds of Bixa orellana. It is used to color plasters and butter. Syn., annattn; arnotlo.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      annot'to. Also arnotta, arnolto, and annatto. A reddish coloring matter derived from the pulp of iii.ru orellana, a tree of tropical America.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      annott'o. Arnotto.
  133. annuens - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      annuens (an'-u-ens) [annuere, to nod]. The rectua capitis anticus minor muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ann'uens [L. annuere, to nod to.] Musculus rectus capitis anterior.
  134. anoci-association - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anoci-association (ah-no'-se-as-o-se-a'-shun). The condition in which pain, fear, shock, and neuroses are blocked, and so excluded, hi surgical cases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anoci-association (3-no'sI-as-so-sl-a'shun) [G. a, priv.] A condition in which all noci*-associations are excluded, thus preventing fear, pain, shock, and postoperative neuroses in cases of surgical operations or trauma.
  135. anodontia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anodontia (an-o-don'-sne-ak) [Ai-, priv. ; &5oft, tooth]. Absence of the teeth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anodontia (an-o-don'she-ah) [Gr. iv priv. + Mots tooth]. Absence of the teeth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anodontia (an-o-don'shyah) [G. an- priv. + odous (pdont-), tooth.] Absence of teeth.
  136. anoesia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anoesia (an-o-e'-se-ah) [^vo^aia, a want of sense). Want of understanding.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anoe'sia (an-o-e'ze-ah) [Gr. AyoiprlaJ. Want of understanding; idiocy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anoesia (an-o-e'sl-ah) [G. anofsia, from a- priv. + noos, perception.] Idiocy, imbecility, lack of the power of comprehension.
  137. anoetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anoetic (an-o-et'ik) [Gr. a neg. • .•„,,.-,',-, thinkable]. Not subject to conscious attention.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anoetic (an-o-et'ic). i. Relating to or suffering from anoesia. 2. Incomprehensible.
  138. anomaloscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anomaloscope (an-om'alK>-sk6p) [Gr. di'wi+ anoitfiv to view]. An instrument for examining the eye to detect color-blindness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anomaloscope (an-om'al-o-skOp) [G. anomalos, irregular, -t- skoped, I examine.] An instrument in the form of a telescope, employed for the detection of color blindness; i.e. of dichromatism and of anomalous trichromatism.
  139. anophthalmos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anophthalmos (an-off-lhal'-mas) [4», priv.; i«0oXftfa, eye). i. Congenital absence of the eyes. 2. A person born without eyes.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anophthal'mos. Congenital lack of the eyes. [Gr., an, priv., + ophthalmoi, eye.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anophthal'mos. Anophthalmus (i).
  140. anophthalmus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anophthalmus (an-of-lhal'-mus). See anophlhalmos.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anophthal'mus [G. an- priv. + ophthalmos, eye.] i. Congenital absence of an eye, its place being taken by a small solid or cystic body. 2. A monster without eyes.
  141. anosmatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anosmatic (an-dz-mat'-ik) [A», priv.; 4a/»t), smell]. I. With small olfactory lobes. 2. Not having a keen sense of smell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anosmat'ic. Relating to anosmia.
  142. antalgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antalgic (ottt-al'-jik) [anli-; 0X701, pain], i. Relieving pain. 2. A remedy that relieves pain.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      antal'gic. Anodyne. [Gr., anti, against, •*• algos, pain.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antalgic (ant-al'jik) [Gr. A>;i against + &\ym pain], i. Relieving pain. t. A remedy for pain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antal'gic [G. anti, against, + algos, pain.] Anodyne.
  143. antalkaline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antalkaline (ant-al'-kal-in) [iinli-; alkali}. I. Neutralizing alkalies. 2. An agent neutralizing alkalies, as acids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antalkaline (ant-al'kal-In) [Gr. avti against I alkali], i. Neutralizing alkalinity. 2. An agent that neutralizes the alkalis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antal'kaline [G. anti, against.] Reducing or neutralizing alkalinity.
  144. antaphroditic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antaphroditic (onl-aj-ro-dil'-ik). See antaphrodisiac.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antaphrodit'ic. i. Anaphrodisiac. 2. Antivenereal.
  145. antapoplectic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antapoplectic (ant-ap-o-plek'-lik) \nnti-; «-.n.\vJia. apoplexy]. Efficient in preventing or treating apoplexy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antapoplectic (ant"ap-o-plek'tik) [Gr. ia>Ti against + AiroirX»)£(o apoplexy]. Good against apoplexy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antapoplec'tic [G. anti, against.] Having a supposed power to prevent apoplexy or relieve its effects.
  146. antatrophic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antatrophic (ani-ai-rcf'-ik) [ant-; arpo^a. wasting], I. Preventing atrophy. 2. A drug that will prevent wasting or atrophy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antatrophic (ant-at-rof'ik). Correcting or opposing the progress of atrophy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antatroph'ic [G. anti, against. + atrophia.] i. Preventing or curing atrophy. 2. An agent which promotes the restoration of atrophied structures.
  147. antebrachial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antebrachial (an-te-bra'-ke-al). Pertaining to the forearm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antebrachial (an'te-braTd-al). Relatingto the forearm.
  148. antemetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antemetic (ant-em-el'-it). See antiemelic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antemetic (ant-em-et'ik) [Gr. di-rl against + .'»»r it.'r, emetic], i. Relieving nausea or vomiting. 2. An agent that prevents or relieves vomiting.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antemet'ic [G. anti, against, + emetikos, emetic.] i. Preventing or arresting vomiting. 2. A remedy which tends to control nausea and vomiting.
  149. antero- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antero- (an'-te-ro-) [anterior, before]. A prefix signifying position in front.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      antero-. Combining form of Lat., anterior; used in compound words as a prefix to signify front, fore.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antero- [L. ante'rior before]. A prefix signifying " before."
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antero-. A prefix denoting anterior.
  150. anthracic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracic (an'-thras-ik) [anthrax]. Pertaining to or of the nature of anthrax.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracic (an-thras'ik). Pertaining to or resembling anthrax.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthracic (an-thras'ik). Relating to anthrax.
  151. anthracin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracin (an'-thras-in) [anthrax]. A toxic ptomaine derived from pure cultures of the bacillus of anthrax.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracin (an'thras-in). A poisonous ptomain from anthrax cultures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'thracin. i. Anthracene. 2. A toxin of the anthrax bacillus.
  152. anthracoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracoid (an'-thrah-oid) [anthrax; tlSot. likeness]. Resembling carbon, anthrax, or the gem carbuncle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracoid (an'thrak-oid) [Gr. <W,m£ coal + < ions form]. Resembling anthrax or a carbuncle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'thracoid [G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a carbuncle or a malignant pustule; resembling anthrax or its bacillus.
  153. anthracometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracometer (an~thrak-om'-et-er) [anthrax; ^tpov, a measure]. An Instrument for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide in the air.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracometer (an-thrak-om'et-er) [Gr. anVnt coal 4- iin/nn' measure]. An instrument for measuring the carbon dioxid of the air.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthracom'eter [G. anthrax, coal (carbon), + metron, measure.] An instrument for determining the amount of carbon dioxide in the air or other gaseous mixture.
  154. anthracosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracosis (an-thrak-o'-sis) [anthrax; v&aat, disease]. i. "Miners' lung." A diseased condition of the lung produced by the inhalation of coal-dust. It fa a form of pneumokoniosis. 2. A malignant or corroding ulcer; a carbuncle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracosis (an-thrah-ko'sis) [Gr. bvOpaicuait]. i. A malignant ulcer. 2. Lung disease produced by inhaled coal-dust; pneumokoniosis or miners' lung.
  155. anthropography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthropography (an-thro-pog'-ra-fe) [anthropo-; ~rp&4>eiv, to write]. A treatise upon the human structure or organism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthropog'raphy [G. anthrdpos, man, -1- graphd, I write.] The geography of man, the distribution of the human races.
  156. anthropometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthropometer (on-thro-pom'-et-er) [anthropo-; fitrpov, a measure]. An instrument used in anthropometry.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthropom'eter. One skilled in anthropometry.
  157. anthroponomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthroponomy (an-thro-pon'-om-e) [anthropo-; man; vonot, a law]. The sum of what is known concerning the laws which control the formation and functions of the human body.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anthropon'omy. The science of the law* governing the formation and functions of the body. [Gr., anthropos, a man, + nomos, a rule.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthroponomy (an-thro-pon'o-me) [Gr. fixdpunro? man + Pojjoi law). The science that deals with the laws of human development in relation to environment and to other organisms.
  158. anthroposomatology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthroposomatology (an-thro-Po-so-mat-olr-o-je) [anthropo^; v&pa, body; \byot, science]. The sum of what is known regarding the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anthroposomatology (an"thro-po-so-mat-oro-je) [Gr. avBponms man + adpa body -f- \6yot discourse]. The sum of knowledge regarding the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthroposomatology (an"thro-po-so-mat-ol'o-je) [Gr. di-flpuiros man + awpa. body + \6yot discourse). The sum of knowledge regarding the human body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthroposomatology (an-thro"po-so-ma-tol'o-jl) [G. anthropos, man, + soma, body, 4- -logia.] That part of anthropology which has to do with the human body, such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, etc.
  159. anthropotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthropotomy (an-thro-pot'-o-me') [anthropo-; ro^-h, section]. Human anatomy, or dissection -of the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anthropotomy (an-thro-pot'o-me) [Gr. avOpwnos man + ro/jij cut]. Human anatomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthropotomy (an-thro-pot'o-me) [Gr. man + Tojiij cut). Human anatomy.
  160. anthypnotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthypnotic (ant-hip-notf-ik) [anti-; &ttfoj. sleep], i. Preventive of sleep. 2. An agent that tends to induce wakefulness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anthypnotic (ant-hip-not'ik) [Gr. C\vti against + forvos sleep]. Preventing or hindering sleep.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthypnotic (ant-hip-not'ik). Antihypnotic.
  161. antiaditis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiaditis (an-li-ad-i'-tis) [Amis, tonsil; It«, inflammation]. Tonsillitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiaditis (an-te-ad-i'tis) [Gr. Av-rias tonsil + -ira inflammation]. Inflammation of the tonsils.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiaditis (an-tl-ad-i'(e')tis) [G. antias(antiad-'), an enlarged tonsil, H—itis.] Tonsillitis.
  162. antiaggressin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiaggressin (an"te-ag-res'in). A substance formed in the body by repeated injection of an aggressin, and tending to oppose the action of the aggressin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiaggress'in. A specific antibody preventing the action of an aggressin.
  163. antibrachial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antibrachial (an-tr-bra'-'--- -..-h [anti-; rt,i.n,i' ••-. the arm]. Pertaining to the forearm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antibrachial (an-tl-bra'kl-al). Relating to the forearm.
  164. anticor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anticor (an'te-kor). A swelling or slough in the neck of a horse, caused by irritation of the harness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anticor (an'ti-kor). A sore in the horse caused by pressure or friction by the harness.
  165. antidinic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antidinic (an-te-din'-ik) [anti-; Kra, a whirl]. Relieving or preventing vertigo.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antidinic (an-te-din'ik) [Gr. ai'ri against + jZcot whirl]. Curing or preventing vertigo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antidin'ic [G. unti, against, + dinos, dizziness.] i. Relieving vertigo. 2. An agent which prevents or relieves vertigo.
  166. antidysenteric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antidysenteric (an-te-dis-en-ter'-ik) [anti-; dysentery], i. Serviceable against dysentery. 2. A remedy for dysentery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antidysenter'ic. Relieving or preventing dysentery.
  167. antienzyme - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antienzyme (an-te-en'zim) [Gr. tvrl against + entyme]. i. An agent that neutralizes an enzyme: formed in the blood-serum of an animal on the injection of the enzyme. 2. An enzyme which neutralizes the action of another enzyme.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antienzyme (an"tl-en'zim). i. An antibody to an enzyme. 3. An inhibitory enzyme, one capable of retarding or checking the activity of another enzyme.
  168. antifebrile - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antifebrile (an-tc-fcb'-rit) [anti-; febris, a fever]. An ngent reducing a fever; a febrifuge.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antifebrile (an-te-feb'ril) [anti- + L. fe'bris fever]. Allaying or diminishing fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antifebrile (an"tl-fe'bru, an"tl-feb'ril) [G. anti, against, + L. febris, fever.] Antipyretic.
  169. antifebrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antifebrin (an-te-feb'-rin) [anti-; febris, a fever], CcHi.CfHiO.NH. The proprietary name of acetanilide or phenylacetamide. A white, crystalline powder, insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, ether, and chloroform. It is antipyretic and analgesic. The drug's official name is acetanilidum. Dose 5-10 gr. (0.3-0.6 Gm.),
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antifeb'rin. Trade name of acetanilid. a. sal'icylate, salifebrin.
  170. antihydropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antihydropic (an-te-hi-drop'-ik)* See anthydropic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antihydropic (an"te-hi-drop'ik) [anti- + hydropic]. Relieving dropsical conditions.
  171. antihydropin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antihydropin (an-te-hi'-dro-pin) [anti-; Map, water]. A crystalline principle obtainable from the common cockroach, BlaUa (Periplantta) orientals, and said to be diuretic. Dose 10-20 Rt. (0.6-1.3 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antihydropin (an-te-hi'dro-pin). A crystalline diuretic substance obtained from cockroaches. Dose, 10-15 gr. (0.666-1 gm.).
  172. antiluetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiluetic (an-te-lu-et'-ik) [anti-; lues, the plague; yphiltsj. Efficacious against syphilis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiluetic (an"te-lu-et'ik). Antisyphilitic.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      antiluetic (an-te-lu-et'ik). Antisyphilitic. [Gr., anti, against, + Lat., lues, syphilis.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiluetic (an"te-lu-et'ik). Antisyphilitic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiluetic (an-tl-lu-et'ik). Antisyphilitic.
  173. antilyssic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antilyssic (an-te-lis'ik) [Gr. dcW against + \vaaa rabies]. Tending to cure rabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antilyssic (an-te-Us'ik) [Gr. tori against + \vaaa. rabies]. Tending to cure rabies.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antilyss'ic. Antirabic preventing or curing rabies.
  174. antimedical - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antimedical (an-te-med'ik-al). Inconsistent with the principles of medical science.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antimedical (an-te-med'ik-al). Inconsistent with the principles of medical science.
  175. antimephitic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antimephitic (an-te-mef-il'-ik) [anti-; mephitis, a pestilential exhalation]. Efficacioua against foul exhalations or their effects.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antimephitic (an-te-mef-it'ik). Purifying the atmosphere.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antimephitic (an-te-mef-it'ik). Purifying the atmosphere.
  176. antinarcotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antinarcotic (an-te-nor-iol'-ift) [anti-; riptuva, & benumbing). Preventing narcosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antinarcotic (an"te-nar-kor/ik). Serviceable against narcotism.
  177. antineuralgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antineuralgic (an-te-ntt-ral'-jik) [anti-; rtupor. a
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antineuralgic (an"te-nu-ral'jik). Relieving neuralgia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antineural'gic. Relieving the pain of neuralgia.
  178. antiodontalgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiodontalgic (an-te-o-don-tal'-jik) [anti-; ttofe, tooth; AXyoj. pain). Curative of toothache.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiodontal'gic [G. anti, against, + odous(odont-}, tooth, + algos, pain.] i. Relieving toothache. 2. A toothache remedy.
  179. antiorgastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiorgastic (an-le-or-gas'-lih) [anti-; op-,swelling, excitement). Anaphrodisiac.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiorgas'tic. Antaphrodisiac, anaphrodisiac
  180. antiparalytic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiparalytic (an-tt-par-at-it'-ik) [anti-; paralysis], I. Efficient against paralysis. An agent or remedy efficacious in paralysis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiparalytic (an"te-par-al-it'ik) (anli- + paralysis]. Relieving paralytic conditions.
  181. antiphone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiphone (an'-le-fSn) \anli-; .,'•.•• i, sound). An appliance worn in the auditory meatus, and intended to protect the wearer from noises.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiphone (an'te-fdn) [Gr. avrl before + cu*i voice]. An instrument to be worn in the auditory meatus to protect the ear from noises.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiphone (an'te-f6n) [Gr. irrl before + voice]. An instrument to be worn in the auditory meat us to protect the ear from noises.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'tiphone [G. anti, against, + phone, sound.] An appliance for occluding the external auditory meatus to dull the perception of disturbing noises.
  182. antiphthisic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiphthisic (an-tc-lh'-ik) [anli-; QQUra, a wasting). Efficient against phthisis. An agent checking in phthisis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiphthisic (an-tif-thiz'ik or an-te-tiz'ik). Check' ing or relieving phthisis.
  183. antiplastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiplastic (an-le-plas'-tik) [anli-; . to form). I. Unfavorable to granulation or to the healing process. 2. An agent impoverishing the blood. 3. Preventing or checking plastic exudation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiplastic (an-te-plas'tik) [Gr. AW against + lrXaaaeii' to form]. 1. Unfavorable to the healing process. 2. An agent that impoverishes the blood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiplastic (an-te-plas'tik) i. Unfavorable to the healing process. 2. An agent that impoverishes the blood
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiplas'tic. Preventing cicatrization.
  184. antipodagric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antipodagric (an-te-po-dag'-rik) [anti-; Tru^a-rpd. gout). Efficacious against gout.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antipodagric (an-te-po-dag'rik). Curing gout.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antipodagric (an-te-po-dag'rik). Curing gout.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antipodag'ric. Antiarthritic.
  185. antipsoric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antipsoric (an-lip-so'-rik) [anfi-; ^upa, the itch). Effective against itching or the itch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antipsoric (an-tip-so'rik) [Gr. 6lvti against + v'copa itch]. Curative of the itch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antipsoric (an-tip-so'rik) [Gr. inl against + ^ii>pa itch]. Curative of the itch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antipsoric (an-te-so'rik or an-tip-so'rik) [G. anti, against, + psora, the itch.] Curative of scabies, or the itch a. rem'edy, in homeopathy, one which is especially serviceable in the treatment of psora* or of chronic disease in general.
  186. antipyic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antipyic (an-te-pi'ik) [Gr. ivrl against + icvov pus]. Preventing or restraining suppuration.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antipyic (an-te-pi'ik) [Gr. rirri against -V rinr pus]. Preventing or restraining suppuration.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antipy'ic [G anti, against, 4- pyon, pus.] Antipyogenic.
  187. antipyresis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antipyresis (an"te-pi-re'sis) [Gr. ivrl against + Tvphootiv to have a fever]. The therapeutic use of antipyretics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antipyresis (an"te-pi-re'sis) [Gr. 4>Ti against + Trvpiaauf to have a fever]. The therapeutic use of antipyretics.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antipyre'sis. Treatment of fever as a symptom, antipyretic [G. anti, against, + pyretos, fever.] i.
  188. antipyrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antipyrin (an-te-pi'rin) [Gr. Ami against + rvp fire]. A grayish or reddish crystalline basic coaltar derivative, CuH„NaO = C,H5(OH)(CH3),N,. It is soluble in water, chloroform, and alcohol: it is antipyretic, antirheumatic, and analgesic, and is used in typhoid fever, pneumonia, phthisis, rheumatism, and neuralgia. Dose, 5-10 gr. (0.333-0.666 gm.). a. acetylsalicylate, acetopyrin. a. amygdalate, a salt of antipyrin: used in treatment of whooping-cough. Dose, }-6 gr. (0.040-0.4 gm.). a. benzoate, benzopyrin. a. camphorate, an antipyretic compound used in night-sweats, a. mandelate, a salt of antipyrin: a non-poisonous antipyretic. See tussol. a. meta-oxybenzoate, a liquid salt of antipyrin. a. monobromid, bromopyrin. a. paraozybenzoate, a crystalline salt of antipyrin. a. salicylate. Same as salipyrin. a. tannate, a yellowish, tasteless powder, insoluble in water, and containing 37 per cent, of antipyrin.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      antipyrin (an"te-pi'rin). Syn.: anodyrin, dimethyloxyquinicin. An artificial alkaloid, CiiHisNsO. First obtained by L. Knorr of Erlangen. A white crystalline powder soluble in water and in alcohol. It was introduced into medicine as an antipyretic by Filehne in 1881. a. camphorate. A compound of a. and camphoric acid. Two forms, the acid and the
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antipyrin (an-te-pi'rin) [Gr. &vrl against + Ttvp fire]. A grayish or reddish crystalline basic coaltar derivative, CUH,,N2O - C»Hs(OH)(CHj),Nj. It is soluble in water, chloroform, and alcohol: it is antipyretic, antirheumatic, and analgesic, and is used in typhoid fever, pneumonia, phthisis, rheumatism, and neuralgia. Dose, 5-10 gr. (0.333-0 • gm.). a. acetylsalicylate, acetopyrin. a. aruygdalate, a salt of antipyrin: used m treatment of whooping-cough. Dose, J-6 gr. (0.040-0.4 gm.). a. benzoate, benzopyrin. a. camphoratfl, an antipyretic compound used in night-sweats, a. mandelate, a salt of antipyrin: a non-poisonous antipyretic. See tussol. a. meta-oxybenzoate, a liquid salt of antipyrin. a. monobromid, bromopyrin. a. paraozybenzoate, a crystalline salt of antipyrin. a. salicylate. Same as salipyrin. a. tannate, a yellowish, tasteless powder, insoluble in water, and containing 37 per cent, of antipyrin.
  189. antirabic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'-bik) [anti-; rabies, madness]. Preventing or curing rabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'bik). Preventive of or curing rabies; antilyssic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'bik). Preventive of or curing rabies; antilyssic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antirab'ic. Preventive or curative of rabies, antilyssic.
  190. antisepticism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisepticism (an-te-sep'-tis-izm) [see antisepsin]. The theory or systematic employment of antiseptic methods.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antisepticism (an-te-sep'tis-izm). The systematic employment of antiseptic agents.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antisep'ticism. The exclusion of germs from a wound, antiseptic surgery; the employment of antiseptic measures in therapeutics.
  191. antisepticize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisepticize (an-te-sep'-tis-lt) [see antisepsin]. To render antiseptic; to treat with antiseptics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antisepticize (an-te-sep'tis-iz). To render antiseptic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antisepticize (an-te-sep'tis-Iz). To render antiseptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antisep'ticize. To employ antiseptic agents for the removal or destruction of pathogenic microorganisms.
  192. antisplenetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisplenetic (an-te-spUn-et'-ik) [anti-; spUn, the spleen]. Remedial in diseases of the spleen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antisplenetic (an"te-sple-net'ik). Useful in spleen diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antisplenetic (an"te-sple-net'ik). Useful in spleen diseases.
  193. antisudoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisudoral (an-te-su'-dor-aT) [anti-; sudor, sweat]. Checking the secretion of sweat.
  194. antisyphilitic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisyphilitic (an-te-sif-il-itf-ik) [anti-; syphilis]. i. Effective against syphilis. 2. A remedy used In the treatment of syphilis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antisyphilitic (an"te-sif-il-it'ik) [Gr. &vrl against -)- syphilitic], i. Useful in cases of syphilis, i. A remedy for syphilis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antisyphilit'ic. i. Curative of syphilis, i. A specific remedy for syphilis.
  195. antitetanic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antitetanic (an-tt-tet-an'-ik). Noting an agent used to mitigate or aid in the cure of tetanus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antitetanic (an"te-tet-an'ik). Preventing or cnr* ing tetanus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antitetan'ic. Noting an agent which tends to relax tetanic muscular contraction
  196. antithermic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antithermic (an-te-ther'-mik) (anti-; dippy, heat]. Cooling; antipyretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antithermic (an-te-ther'mik) [Gr. iarrl against + heat]. Antipyretic; antifebrile.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antithermic (an-tl-thur'mik) [G. -anti, against, + thermS, heat.] Antipyretic.
  197. antitrope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antitrope (an'-te-trdp) [anti-; Tfii-tn-, to turn]. Organs arranged to form a symmetrical pair. Thus the right eye is an antitrope to the left. 2. An antibody.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antitrope (an'te-trop) [Gr. ami against + rpivav to turn]. 1. Any organ which forms a symmetric pair with another. 2. Same as antibody.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antitrope (an'tl-trop) [G. anti, against, + trope, a turn.] i. Antibody. 2. Antimere(a).
  198. antityphoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antityphoid (an-U-ti'-foid). Opposed to typhoid, a. extract, a preparation obtained by injecting repeatedly cultures of typhoid bacilli of increasing virulence into the peritoneal cavity of rabbits. The animals are killed an soon as they do not react to poisonous doses, and extracts are made of the thymus, spleen, bone-marrow, brain, and spinal cord, by soaking these organs in a solution of salt, glycerol, and alcohol, with the addition of some pepsin. The filtrate is injected in typhoid cases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antityphoid (an-te-ti'foid). Counteracting or preventing typhoid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      an"tity'phoid. Counteracting or prevailing typhoid.
  199. antivenene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antivenene (an"te-ven-en') [Gr. avri against + L. oendnum poison]. An extractive from the bloodserum of animals inoculated with serpent poison: used as an antitoxin of venom poisoning.
  200. antizymotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antizymotic (an-U-n-mot'-ik) [anti-; {binara, fermeutalionl. i. Preventing or checking fermentation. 2. An agent preventing the process of fermentation; an anti ferment.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antizymotic (an"te-zi-mot'ik). Opposing the action of Terments or ferment-like germs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antizymot'ic. Antiseptic; inhibiting the action of ferments; preventative or curative of any infectious disease.
  201. antodontalgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antodontalgic (an"to-don-tal'jik). Relieving toothache.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antodontal'gic. Antiodontalgic.
  202. aorticorenal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aorticorenal (a-or"tik-o-re'nal). Pertaining to t
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aorticorenal (a-pr"tik-o-re/nai). Pertaining to the aorta and the kidneys.
  203. aortitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aortitis (a-ort-i'-tis) [aorta; Itu, inflammation]Inflammation of aorta, a., nummular, that characterized by white, circular patches in the inner coat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aortitis (a-or-ti'tis) [aorta -f- Gr. -ms inflammation]. Inflammation of the aorta. DohleHeller a., syphilitic aortitis. a. syphilit'ica oblit'erans, syphilitic aortitis resulting in obliteration of the aorta or some of its branches.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aortitis (a-or-ti'(te')tis). Inflammation of the aorta.
  204. apanthropy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apanthropy (ap-an'-thrn-pe) [dir«. from: 4>flp<i»-oi. man]. Aversion to society: morbid desire for solitude.
  205. apepsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apepsia (ah-pep'-se-ah) [d. priv.; flrr**, to digest]. Cessation or absence of the digestive function, a,, hysterical, apepsia due to hysteria. Syn., hysterical anorexia, a. nervosa, see anorexia nervosa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apep'sia [G. a- priv. -I- pepsis, a digesting.] Extreme dyspepsia; complete cessation of digestion.
  206. apertometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apertometer (ap-ur-lom'-et-er) [aperture; ptrpor, a measure]. .An optic device for determining the angle of aperture of microscopic objectives.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apertom'eter [L. apertura, aperture, + G. metron, measure.] An instrument for measuring the angular aperture of a microscope objective.
  207. aphasiac - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aphasiac (ak-fa'-xe-ak) [see aphasia]. One who is aphasic.
  208. aphemic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aphemic (ah-ff'-mik) [see aphemia]. Relating to or affected with aphemia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aphemic (ah-fem'ik). Pertaining to or affected with aphemia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aphe'mic. Relating to or suffering from aphemia.
  209. aphonic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aphonic (ah-fon'ik). i. Pertaining to or affected with aphonia. 2. Without audible sound.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aphon'ic. Relating to or suffering from aphonia.
  210. aphrodisia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aphrodisia (af-ro-dizf-e-ah) I' v<v--'•••". Venus]. Sexual desire, especially when morbid or immoderate; sexual congress.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aphrodisia (af-ro-diz'e-ah) [Gr. iuppoStna venery]. 1. Sexual desire, especially if morbid or excessive. 2. Venery or sexual congress.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aphrodis'ia [G. aphrodisios, relating to Aphrodite or Venus.] i. Sexual desire. 2. Sexual congress.
  211. apneumatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apneumatic (ap-nu-mat'-ik) [4, priv.; vrcOpa. breath], i. Collapsed; uninflated, not inflatable; said of parts of the lung. 2. Carried on with the exclusion of air, as an apneumatic operation or process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apneumatic (ap-nu-mat'ik) [O. a- priv. + fneuma, breath.] Containing no air, noting the lungs in a state of collapse.
  212. apodous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apodous (op'-o-dut) [4. priv.; wvtit, a foot]. Footless; characterized by apodia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ap'odous. Apodal, without feet.
  213. aponeurotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aponeurotic (ap-on-u-rol'-ih) [aponeurosis]. Pertaining to an aponeurosis. a. fascia, a deep fascia.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      aponeurot'ic. Relating to, resembling, or constituting an aponeurosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aponeurotic (ap"o-nu-rot'ik). Pertaining to or of the nature of an aponeurosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aponeurot'ic. Relating to an aponeurosis.
  214. aponeurotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aponeurotomy (ap-nn-ii-rol'-o-me) [uTonbpuau. aponeurosis; Toui, cutting). The incision, dissection, or anatomy of the fasciav, fasciotomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aponeurotomy (ap"o-nu-rot'o-me) [aponeurosis + Gr. To/ii? a cut]. Surgical cutting of an aponeurosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aponeurot'omy [aponeurosis + G. tome, section.] Incision of an aponeurosis.
  215. apophlegmatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apophlegmatic (ap-o-fle&-mat'-ik) [6*6, away: $\tyita, phlegm]. Promoting the expulsion of mucus from the air passages.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apophlegmatic (ap-o-fleg-mat'ik). Causing a discharge of mucus; expectorant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apophlegmat'ic [G. apo, away, + plilegma, mucus.] Producing a discharge of mucus; expectorant.
  216. apophysary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apophysary (ap-off'-is-o-re) [twotfrtttir, to put forth]. Pertaining to or of the nature of an apophysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apophysary (a-pof i-sa-rl). Relating to an apophysis, apophyseal.
  217. apoplectiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apoplectiform (ap-o-ptek'-lif-orm) [apoplexy; forma, form]. Resembling apoplexy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apoplec'tiform [G. apoplexia, apoplexy, + L forma, appearance.] Apoplectoid.
  218. apositic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apositic (ap-o-sit'-ik) [in-6, from; alrot, food]. Impairing the appetite; affected with apositia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apositic (ap-o-sit'ik). Causing a loathing of food; diminishing the appetite.
  219. apospory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apospory (ap-os'po-re) [Gr. Air6 away + spore]. Lack of power of forming spores.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apos'pory [G. apo, from, -I- sporos, seed ] In botany, absence of the power of producing spores.
  220. apostasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apostasis (ap-os'-tas-is) [iurboraau, a standing away from], i. An abscess. 2. The end or the crisis of an attack of disease; termination by crisis. 3. An exfoliation.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      apos'tasis. 1. The termination of a disease by the formation of an abscess or by some critical discharge. 2. An abscess, especially a wandering abscess or one that is accompanied by the separation of a piece of bone. [Gr., apostasis, from apo, away from, + islanai, to stand.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apostasis (ap-os'tas-is) [Gr.]. i. An abscess. 2. The end or crisis of an attack of disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apos'tasis [G. a departure from, an abscess.] i. The termination of a disease, a. Exfoliation of bone. 3. Abscess.
  221. applanation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      applanation (ap-la-na'shun) ii, applana'lio]. Uniliu1 flatness, as of the cornea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      applana'tion [L. ad, to, + planare, to flatten.] Flattening of a normally convex surface.
  222. aquapuncture - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aquapuncture (ak'-ivah-punzk'-chur) [aqua; punctura, a puncture), i. Counterirritation by means of a very fine jet of water impinging upon the skin; it is useful in neuralgic disorders. 2. The hypodermatic Injection of water an a placebo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aquapuncture (ak-wah-pung'chur) [L. aqua, water, 4- punctura, puncture.] Hypodermic injection of water to produce counterimtation or for any other purpose.
  223. arachnitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arachnitis (or-ak-ni'-tis) [arachnoid; Itu. inflammation]. Inflammation of the arachnoid membrane of the brain. Syn., Uptomeningitis externa; arafhnodeitis; arachnoiditis; arachnoideitis; aracJinoitis. a., rha chid tan. a.f spinal, spinal meningitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arachnitis (ar-ak-ni'tis) [arachnoid + -it» inflammationj. Inflammation of the arachnoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arachnitis (ar-ak-ni'(ne') tis). Inflammation of the arachnoid membrane, arachnoiditis.
  224. arachnoidal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arachnoidal (ar-ak-noid'-al) [see arachnoid]. Pertaining to the arachnoid membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arachnoidal (ar-ak-noid'al). Of or pertaining to the arachnoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arachnoidal (ar-ak-noyMal). Relating to the arachnoid membrane, or arachnoidea.*
  225. arack - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arack. arrack (ar-ak') [East Indian]. An alcoholic liquor distilled from dates, rice, the sap of palms, mahua flowers, etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'ack [Hindoo word.] A strong alcoholic liquor distilled from dates, rice, sap of the cocoanut palm, and other substances.
  226. araneous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      araneous (ar-a'-ne-us) [aranea, a spider's web], i. Full of webs; resembling a cobweb. 2. Applied to a thready, feeble pulse. 3. Consisting .of separate filaments, a. membrane, the arachnoid membrane. Arantius, bodies of (ar-an'-shi-us) [Julius Caesar Arantius (Arantio, or Aransiti), Italian anatomist, 1530-1589]. The fibrous tubercles In the center of each segment of the semilunar valves. A., canal of, A., duct of, the ductus venosus. The smaller of the two branches into which the umbilical vein divides after entering the abdomen; it empties into the ascending vena cava and becomes obliterated after birth. A., ligament of, the obliterated ductus venosus
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      araneous (ar-a'ne-us) [L. ara'ncus]. Like a cobweb.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      araneous (a-ra'ne-us) [L. aranea, cobweb.] Like a cobweb; arachnoid.
  227. araroba - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      araroba (ar-ar-o'-bak) [Brazil]. Go a powder. An oxidation-product of the resin found deposited In the wood of the trunk of A. cndira, of Brazil. Its active principle is chrysarobin or chrysophanic acid. It is largely used in skin affections.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      araro'ba. Goa powder or crude chrysarobin, derived from Andira a. See clirysarobin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      araroba (ar-ar-o'bah) [Brazilian], i. See Andira. a. Sec Coa powder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arar'oba [Brazil Indian, bark.] (Br.) Goa powder, crude chrysarobin, the dried and powdered concretion found in the wood of Vouacapoua araroba (Andira araroba) a forest tree of Brazil; it contains about 50 per cent, of chrysarobin.
  228. archebiosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archebiosis (ark-e-bi~of-sis) [arch-; ptot, life]. Spontaneous generation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archebiosis (ar"ke-bi-o'sis) [Gr. ipxh beginning + fi'un life]. The supposed spontaneous generation of organisms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      archebiosis (ar"ke-bi-o'sis) [Gr. •;,. \ ;,> beginning + P'i-c, life]. The supposed spontaneous generation of organisms.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archebiosis (ar-ke-bi-o'sis) [G. arche, origin, + biosis, life.] Spontaneous generation, abiogenesis.
  229. archegenesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archegenesis (ark-c-jcn'-es-is). The same as archebiosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archegenesis (ar-kc-jen'es-is) [Gr. ipxq beginning -f yevtcis reproduction]. Same as archebiosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archegenesis (ar-ke-gen'e-sis) [G. arche, beginning, -f- genesis, origin.] Spontaneous generation.
  230. archeocyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archeocyte (ar'-ke-o-sit). Same as archaeocyte.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archeocyte (ar'ke-o-slt) [Gr. dpxaios ancient + K6tos cell]. Any free or wandering ameboid cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archeocyte (ar'ke-o-slt). Archseocyte.
  231. archesporium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archesporium (ar-ke-spo'rl-um) [G. arche, beginning, + sforos, seed.] A layer of cells giving rise to the mother cells of spores or pollen.
  232. archiblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archiblast (ar'-kf-l>ln.\t'\ [archi-; 0Xaarablast, or connective tissues.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archiblast (ar'ke-blast) [Gr. dpxi; first + 0\aar6s germ]. I. The formative material or protoplasm of an egg. 2. His' term for the fundamental part of the blastodermic layers as distinguished from the parablast or peripheral portion of the mesoderm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      archiblast (ar'ke-blast) [Gr. ipxrj first + /SXoffrAs germ], i. The formative material or protoplasm of an egg. 2. His' term for the fundamental part of the blastodermic layers as distinguished from the parablast or peripheral portion of the mesoderm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archiblast (ar'ld-blast) [G. archi-, primitive, + blastos, germ.] i. Epiblast* of His. a. The formative part of the yolk distinguished from that which affords nourishment to the embryo.
  233. archil - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archil (ar'-kit) [ME.. orchtM. A violet coloringmatter similar to litmus, chiefly obtained from the lichen, RocceUa tinctoria; used for staining animal tissues.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      archil (ar'kil). A pigment obtained from the lichen that yields litmus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      archil (ar-kil). The lichen Roccd'la tincto'ria; also a violet coloring-matter from this and other lichens.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archil (ar'kil). A violet dye from the lichens, Roccella iinctoria and R. fuciformis.
  234. arcual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arcual (ar'-ki-aD [arcualis. arched]. Arched; bent or curved.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'cual. Relating to an arch.
  235. arcuation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arcuation (ar-kA-a'-shun) \arcuatio, a bowing]. Curvature, especially of a bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arcuation (ar-ku-a'shun). z. A bending. 2. A curvature.
  236. argentose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      argentose (ar'jen-tos). An astringent and gem
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      argen'tose. A compound of nucleoprotein and silver, containing 30 per cent, of the latter; employed as an astringent and germicide in gonorrhea, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, etc.
  237. arginase - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arginase (arf-jin-&s). A ferment which has the power of splitting arginin into ur?a and ornithin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arginase (ar'jin-as). A ferment existing in the liver which splits arginin into urea and omithin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arginase (ar'jin-az). An enzyme of the liver which splits up arginin, forming urea.
  238. argyrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      argyrol (ar'-jir-ol). A soluble silver salt obtained by combining a proteid of wheat with 30 % of silver. It is used in gonorrhea. Syn., silver vitelline.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ar'gyrol. Silver vitellin, obtained from protein and silver oxid, containing 20 to 25 per cent, silver. It is used in the treatment of cystitis, conjunctivitis, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      argyrol (ar'jir-ol). A vitellin silver preparation in the form of brown scales, soluble in water: used in gonorrhea, conjunctivitis, laryngitis, etc., in a 0.5-2.5 per cent, solution.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'gyrol. A trade name for silver vitelline, a compound of silver and a protein obtained from serum-albumin; a dark-brown powder or scales, freely soluble in water, and containing about 25 per cent, of silver; employed in gonorrhea and in eye diseases in solution of 1-50 to 1-20.
  239. arhythmia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arhythmia (ar-ith'-me-ah). See arrhythmia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arhythmia (ah-rith'me-ah) [Gr. a priv. + p.^.',> rhythm]. Absence of rhythm, especially that of the heart-beat. Ci.txtrasystole. continuous a., irregularity in the force, equality, and sequence of the pulse-beat, continuing as a permanent phenomenon: called also perpetual a. inotropic a., disturbance of the cardiac rhythm due to disturbances of the contractility of the heart muscle. nodal a. See nodal rhythm, under rhythm, perpetual a., arhythmia occurring as a permanent condition, respiratory a., an exaggeration of the normal respiratory increase and expiratory decrease in the frequency of the heart's action. Called :il ii //•,.,."/.•• a. and sinus irregularity, sinus a., irregularity of the heart-beat dependent on interference with the impulses originating at the sinoauricular node.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arhyth'mia. Arrhythmia.
  240. arillode - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arillode (ar'il-od). An appendage of certain seeds attached to the micropyle or raphe.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'illode [L. artllus, aril, + G. eidas, resemblance.] A false aril, or appendage of a seed, originating often from the micropyle.
  241. armoracia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      armoracia (ar-mo-ra'she-ah) [L.]. Horse-radish. See Cochlearia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      armora'cia. Horseradish, armora'cia: ra'diz (Br.), horseradish, the fresh root of Roripa armoraeia, Cochlearia armoraeia, an herb of eastern Europe now naturalized everywhere; employed as a condiment, for the relief of flatulence, and in the prevention and treatment of scurvy.
  242. arrachement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arrachement (ar-ash-mon(g)') [it., a tearing out]. Tearing out; extraction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arrachement (a-rash-mon') [Fr. tearing out.] Pulling out the capsule, in membranous cataract, by means of a capsule-forceps inserted through a corneal incision.
  243. arrosion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arrosion (ar-o'-xhun) [arrodere, to gnaw]. The gnawing or destruction of vessel-walls by ulcerous processes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arrosion (ar-o'zhun) [L. ab away + ro'dere to gnaw). Wasting away of a vessel-wall under pressure.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arrosion (ar-o'zhun) [L. ab away + ro'dere to gnaw]. Wasting away of a vessel-wall under pressure.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arrosion (a-ro'zhun) [L. arrodere, to gnaw at.] Erosion.
  244. arsenicophagy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arsenicophagy (ar-sen-ik-off'-a-je) [arsenum. arsenic; ^o7«[>-. to eat]. The habitual eating of arsenic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arsenicophagy (ar"sen-ik-oFaj-e) [arsenic + Gr ipayeiv to eat). The habit of eating arsenic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arsenicoph'agy [G. arsenikon, arsenic, + phago, I eat.] The habitual taking of arsenic (arseni trioxidum), arsenic-eating.
  245. arsenium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arsenium (ar-se'ne-um) [LJ. The element arsenii
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arse'nium. Arsenic, arsenum.* arse'nii io'didum (Br.), arseni iodidum (U.S.).
  246. arteriocapillary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arteriocapillary (ar-U-rr-o-kap' -il-a-re) [artrria; capillary]. Pertaining to arteries and capillaries, a. fibrosis, a chronic inflammatory process characterized by an overgrowth of connective tissue in the walls of the blood-vessels. It is known also as urteriocapillary fibrosis of Gull and Sutton.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriocapillary (ar-te"re-o-kap'il-a-re). Pertaining to the arteries and the capillaries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arteriocapillary (ar-te"re-o-kap'il-a-re). Pertaining to the arteries and the capillaries.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arteriocap'illary. Relating to both arteries and capillaries, a. fibro'sis, arteriosclerosis of the walls of the capillaries and terminal arterioles.
  247. arteriography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arteriography (ar-tf-rr-og'-ra-j:-) \arteria; -,-pij.^, a writingj. z. A description of thj aneriea. 2. The graphic representation of the pulse-waves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriography (ar"te-re-og'ra-fe) [Gr. iprripla artery + ypiim writing]. 1. A description of the arteries. 2. The graphic recording of the arterial pulse.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      arteriography. The process of producing graphic representations of the state of the pulse. 11..'it., arteriographia, from Gr., arteria, an artery, + graphein, to write.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arteriog'raphy [G. grapho, I write, I register.] i. Sphygmography. 2. Description of the arteries.
  248. arteriopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arteriopathy (ar-te-re-opf-a-tke) (arteria; -r&Bot, 21ne»]. Any disease of an artery or of arteries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriopathy (ar"te re-op'ath-e) [Gr. iprripla artery + rriBos disease]. Any arterial disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arteriopathy (ar"te-re-op'ath-e) [Gr. dprTjpi'o artery + ?rd0os disease]. Any arterial disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arteriop'athy [G. pathos, suffering] Any disease of the arteries.
  249. arteriospasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriospasm (ar-te're-o-spazm). Spasm of an artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arteriospasm (ar-te're-o-spazm). Spasm of an artery
  250. arteriotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arteriotomy (ar-te-re-ol'-o-me) [arteria; r^viv, to cut]. I. The cutting or opening of an artery for the purpose of bloodletting. 2. Dissection or anatomy of the arteries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriotomy (ar"te-re-ot'o-me) [Gr. Aprqpia artery + Tout) cut]. The surgical division or opening of an artery, chiefly for the abstraction of blood. Arteriotomy is usually performed upon the temporal artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arteriotomy (ar"te-re-ot'o-me) [Gr. dprijpia artery + 7-0/117 cut). The surgical division or opening of an artery, chiefly for the abstraction of blood. Arteriotomy is usually performed upon the temporal artery.
  251. arthralgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthralgic (ar-tkral'-jik) (aee arthralgia]. Relating to arthralgia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthralgic (ar-thral'jik). Pertaining to arthralgia affected with arthralgia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthralgic (ar-thral'jik). Pertaining to arthralgia; affected with arthralgia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthral'gic. Relating to or affected with arthralgia; arthrodynic.
  252. arthrectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'-to-mt) [arthron; Aktom^, a cutting-out]. Excision of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'to-me) [Gr. ap6por joint H bcrour) excision]. The excision of a joint.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      arthrec'tomy. The operation of opening a joint and removing diseased structures by a process of scraping, gouging, or cutting; also excision of a joint. [Gr., arthron, joint, + ektome, excision.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'to-me) [Gr. apOpov joint + «\ n.fi>) excision). The excision of a joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthrec'tomy [G. arthron, joint, + ekloml, excision.] Exsection of a joint.
  253. arthritism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthritism (ar'thrit-izm) [arthritis]. The go diathesis; the peculiar diathesis or disposition body that predisposes to joint disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthritism (ar'thrit-izm) [arthritis]. The gouty diathesis; the peculiar diathesis or disposition of body that predisposes to joint disease.
  254. arthrodia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrodia (ar-thro'-de-ah} [&p$puSta, a kind of articulation]. A form of joint admitting of a gliding
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthro'dia [G. arthrddia, a gliding joint.] Gliding joint, a spherical joint in which the opposing surfaces are nearly planes and in which there is only a slight, gliding motion, as in the articular processes of the vertebrae, doub'lc a., amphiarthrosis.
  255. arthrodial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrodial (ar-thro'-de-aT) [arthrodia]. Pertaining to or of the nature of arthrodia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthro'dial. Relating to arthrodia.
  256. arthrography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrography (ar-thros'-ra-fe) [arthro-; yp&fcv, to write]. A description of the joints.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthrog'raphy [G. arthron, joint, + graphs, I describe.] A treatise on the joints.
  257. arthrosia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'-ze-ah) ^arthron]. Painful inflammatory or other affection of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'se-ah) [Gr. ap$pov joint], i. A proprietary medicine: said to be antilithic, tonic, and alterative. 2. Painful inflammation of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'se-ah) [Gr. ipSpov joint], i. A proprietary medicine: said to be antilithic, tonic, and alterative. 2. Painful inflammation of a joint.
  258. arthrotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrotomy (ar-throt'-o-me) [arthro-; -±Uk>.to cut]. Incision of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthrotomy (ar-throt'o-me) [Gr. ApOpov joint + TOM17 cut]. Surgical incision of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthrotomy (ar-throt'o-me) [Gr. tpBpov joint + To/it; cut]. Surgical incision of a joint.
  259. artiad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      artiad (ar'-te-ad) [AprMi. even]. In cherr.istry, a term designating an element or radical having an even quantivalence.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      artiad (ar'te-ad) [Gr. ipriot even]. Any chemic element having an even-numbered valency.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'tiad [G. artios, even.] In chemistry, an element of even valence, a dyad, tetrad, or hexad; see perissad
  260. articulatio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      articulatio (ar-tik-u-la'-she-o) [I,., a joint]. A joint; see articulation, a. acromioclavicularis, acromioclavicular joint, a. atlantoepistrophica, joint between atlas and epistropheus or axis. a. atlantooccipitalis, joint between atlas and occipital bone. a. carpometacarpea pollicis, carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, a. calcaneocuboidea, calcaneocuboid joint, a. cochleoris, spiral joint, a. composite, compound joint, a. coxa;, hip-joint, a. cricoarytasnoidea, arycorniculate synchondrosis. a. cricothyreoidea, cricothyreoid articulation. a. cubiti, elbow-joint. a. cuneonavicularis, cuneonavicular joint, a. ellipsoidea, elliptical joint, a. genu, knee joint, a. humeri, shoulder-joint, a. humeroradialis, humeroradial articulation, a. humeroulnaris, humero-ulnar articulation, a. mcudomalleolaris, joint between anvil and hammer, a. incudostapedia, joint between anvil and Btirrup. a. intercarpea, intercarpal articulation, carpal joints, a. mandibularis, jaw-joint, a. manus, joint of the hand. a. ossis pisoformis, joint of the pisiform bone. a. radioulnaris distalis, inferior radio-ulnar joint, a. radioulnaris proximalis, superior radio-ulnar joint. a. sacrpiliaca, sacro-iliac joint, a. sellaris. saddle joint, a. simplex, simple joint, a. sphceroidea, spherical joint, a. stern oclavicularis, sternoclavicular joint, a. talocalcanea, talocalcanean joint. a. talocalcaneonavicularis, talocalcaneonavicular joint. a. talocruralis, ankle-joint. a. talonavicularis, talonavicular joint. a. tarsi transversa (Chopartii, Chopart's transverse articulation of the tarsuj. a. tibiofibularis, superior tibiofibular articulation, a. trochoidea, trochoid or pivot joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      articulatio (ar-tik-u-la'she-o). Latin for articulation, a. tar si transversa, Chopart's joint.
  261. arytenoidectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arytenoidectomy (ar-c-ten-yid-tk'-to-me) [arytrnoid; tmn+. a cutting-out]. Removal of an arvtenoid cartilage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arytenoidectomy (ar"it-e-noi-dek'to-me) [arytenoid + Gr. turofii) excision]. Surgical removal of an arytenoid cartilage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arytenoidec'tomy [G. ektome, excision.] Excision of an arytenoid cartilage.
  262. arytenoiditis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arytenoiditis (ar-e-ltn-air-}- Inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage or muscles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arytenoiditis (ar-it"en-oi-di'tis). Inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage or muscles
  263. ascogonium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ascogonium (as-ko-go'ne-um). The female organ in some of the cryptogamous plants which, after fertilization, develops into asci. Called also archicarp and carpogonium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ascogo'nium [G. askos, bag, + gonos, a begetting.] Archicarp.
  264. aselline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aselline (as-el'-fn). A poisonous leukomaine found in cod-liver oil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aselline (a-sel'en). A poisonous leucomaine found in cod-liver oil.
  265. asemia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asemia (ah-se'me-ah) [Gr. a priv. + afjita sign]. Inability to employ or to understand either speecji or signs, due to a central lesion, a. grapb'ica, inability either to write or to understand writing, due to a central lesion, a. mim'ica, inability to understand or to perform any action expressive of thought or emotion, a. verba'lis, inability to make use of or to understand words.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ase'mia [G. a- priv. + sema, sign.] Asymbolia (2).
  266. asepticism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asepticism (ah-sep'-tis-itm) [see aseptic]. The doctrine or principles of aseptic surgery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      asepticism (ah-sep'tis-izm). The principles and practice of aseptic surgery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asepticism (ah-sep'tis-izm). The principles and practice of aseptic surgery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asepticism (a-sep'tl-sizm). The practice of aseptic surgery.
  267. asepticize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asepticize (ah-sep'*tis-lz) [see aseptic}. To render aseptic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      asepticize (ah-sep'tis-Iz). To render aseptic; to free from pathogenic materials.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asepticize (ah-sep'tis-iz). To render aseptic; to free from pathogenic materials.
  268. asitia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      asitia (ah-sish'e-ah) [Gr. a priv. + o-iVot food]. A loathing for food.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asitia (ah-sish'e-ah) [Gr. a priv. + airm food]. A loathing for food.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asitia (a-sishl-ah) [G. a- priv. + sitos, food.] Anorexia; distaste for food.
  269. aspergillin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aspergillin (as-per-jilr-in) [aspergiUus], A pigment obtained from the spores of AspergiUus niger. Syn.. vegetable hematin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aspergillin (as-per-jil'in). A black pigment resembling hematin. from the spores of various species of Aspergillus: called also vegetable hematin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aspergillin (as-per-jil'm). A black pigment resembling hematin, from the spores of various species of Aspcrgil'lus: called also vegetable hematin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asper'gillin. A black pigment obtained from various species of Aspergillus.
  270. asphyxial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asphyxial (as-fik'se-al). Characterized by asphyxia, asphyxiant (as-fik'se-ant). Producing asphyxia. asphyxiate (as-fik'se-it). To put into a state of
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asphyx'ial. Relating to asphyxia, asphyctic.
  271. assuetude - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      assuetude (as'-sH-e-t&d). Habituation to disturbing Influences; the condition of the organism in which it has acquired such tolerance for a drug or poison that the effect it once had is lost.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      assuetude (as'we-tud). The state of being habituated to disturbing influences.
  272. astasia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      astasia (ah-sta'-se-ah) [A, priv.; <rr6<m, standing].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astasia (as-ta'ze-ah) [Gr. a priv. I ar&aa stand]. Motor incobrdination with inability to stand. a.-abasia, inability either to stand or to walk.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      astasia (as-ta'sl-ah) [G. unsteadiness, from apriv. + stasis, standing.] Inability, through muscular incoordination, to stand, although the same muscles functionate normally if the patient is lying down. a. aba'sia, a similar state in which the patient is unable either to walk or to stand.
  273. astereognosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      astereognosis (ah-$te~re-og-nof-sis) [4, priv.; ffrtptb, solid; -> i-uiffiy, knowledge]. Inability to recognize objects by the sense of touch, due to lesion in the central parietal lobule. Syn., stereoagnosis. Cf., aphasia, tactile.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astereognosis (ah-ste"re-og-no'sis) [Gr. a neg. + rtTt/nov solid + yvSxta recognition]. Loss of power to recognize tne shape of objects by touch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      astereognosis (a-ster"e-og-no'sis) [G. a- priv. + stereos, solid, + gnosis, knowledge.] Loss of the power of judging of the form of an object by touch.
  274. asterion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asterion (as-te'-re-ori) [aster]. A point on the skull corresponding to the junction of the occipital, parietal, and temporal bones.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asterion (as-te're-on) [Gr. AaTepiov star-like]. The point of union of the occipital, parietal, and temporal bones on the surface of the skull.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aste'rion [G. asterios, starry.] A craniometric point in the region of the posterolateral, or mastoid, fontanelle, at the junction of the mastoid temporal, parietal, and occipital bones, or where the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures meet.
  275. asternal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asternal (ah-sler'-nal) [A, priv.; vrkpvov, the breast-bone], i. Without a sternum. 2. Not connected with the sternum, a. ribs, the five lower pairs, because not joined directly to the sternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asternal (as-ter'nal). Not joined to the sternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aster'nal [G. a- priv. + sternon, sternum.] i. Not related to or connected with the sternum, i. Without a sternum.
  276. astigmia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      astigmia (as-tig'me-ah). Same as astigmatism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astigmia (as-tig'me-ah). Same as astigmatism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      astig'mia. Astigmatism.
  277. astomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      astomatous (ah-slo'-mal-us) [A, priv.; trr&na, mouth]. _ In biology, without a mouth or aperture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      astomatous (as-tom'at-us) [Gr. a neg. + orbpa mouth]. Having no mouth.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      as'tomatous. i. Without a mouth. 2. Without pores or apertures. [Gr., a, priv., + stoma, mouth.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astomatous (as-tom'at-us) [Gr. a neg. -f m.'.pa mouth]. Having no mouth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asto'matous [G. a- priv. + sloma, mouth.] i. without a mouth, a. Without apertures, pores, or stomata.
  278. astragalar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      astragalar (as-trag'al-ar). Pertaining to the astragalus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astragalar (as-trag'al-ar). Pertaining to the astragalus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      astrag'alar. Relating to the astragalus.
  279. astriction - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      astriction (as-trit'-ihtiv) [asctrictio; ad, to; strinftre, to bind]. Constipation or any condition resulting from the use of astringents. ,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      astriction (as-trik'shun) [L. astrin'gerc to constrict]. The action of an astringent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      astric'tion. i. Constipation. 3. Astringent action. 3. Compression for the arrest of hemorrhage.
  280. astroblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      astroblast (os'-tro-blasft \aa germ]. A variety of g'.ia-cell less differentiated than the endymal cell and astrocytes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      astroblast (as'tro-blast) [Gr. aorpw star + /S\orot germ]. A cell that develops into an astrocyte. astrocele, astroccale (as'tro-sfl) [Gr. ia-rpov star + noiXos hollow). The hollow space within the astrosphere in which the centrosome lies, astrocinetic (as"tro-sin-et'ik) [Gr. Harpov star + lirrjats movement]. Pertaining to the movements of the attraction-sphere in karyokinesis. astrocyte (as'tro-slt) [Gr. torpor star + uln-m cell]. i. Any star-shaped cell; especially such a cell of the neuroglia: called also spider-cell. 2. A bone-corpuscle: so called from its star-like shape, astrocytoma (as"tro-si-to'mah). A tumor composed of astrocytes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      as'troblast [G. aster, star, + blastos, germ.] A primitive cell developing into an astrocyte.
  281. asymbolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'-le-ah) [4. priv.; rti/i^oXor, symbol). The loss of all power of communication, even by signs or symbols.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'le-ah). A term proposed by Finkelburg for the phenomena of aphasia (q. v.). [Gr., a, priv., -r symbolon, a sign.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'le-ah) [Gr. a priv. + 0-6^fto\ov symbol]. The loss of all power of comprehending symbolic things, such as words, figures, gestures, etc. (Wernicke).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asymbo'lia [G. a- priv. + symbolon, an outward sign.] i. Loss of the power of appreciation by touch of the form and nature of an object. 2. A form of aphasia in which the significance of signs is not appreciated.
  282. asynergia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asynergia (ali-sin-er'-je-ah). Same as asyrurgy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      asynergia (ah-sin-er'je-ah). Same as asynergy. asynergy (ah-sin'er-je) (Gr. a priv. + owtpyia (
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asynergia (ah-sin-er'je-ah). Same as asynerty.
  283. asynergy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asynergy (ah-sin'-er-ji) [4, priv.; rvrtpyla, cooperation]. Faulty coordination of the different organs or musrles normally acting in unison, a., progressive locomotor, a., motorial. See ataxia, locomolor. a., verbal, defective coordination of speech, as In aphasia, a., vocal, faulty coordination of the muscles of the larynx due to chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asynergy (ah-sin'er-je) [Gr. a priv. + awepyla cooperation). Lack of coordination among parts or organs normally acting in harmony, appendicular a., asynergy confined to the extremities, axial a., asynergy affecting the axial musculature. azio-appendlcular a., asynergy affecting both the trunk and extremities, a. ma'jor, marked incoordination as indicated by staggering gait. a. mi nor, mild incoordination as indicated by pointing tests, trunkal a., asynergy affecting the muscles of the trunk.
  284. asystematic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asystematic (ah-sis-lem-at'-ik) [4, priv.; Wot^h*, system]. Diffuse; not restricted to any one or several systems of nerve fibers; applied to nervous diseases that are general.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asystematic (ah"sis-tem-at'ik). Not confined to any one system of nerve-fibers; diffuse.
  285. ataxiophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ataxiophobia (ah-tax"e-o-fo'be-ah). Ataxophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ataxiopho'bia [G. phobos, fear.] Morbid dread of suffering from tabes dorsalis.
  286. ataxophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ataxophobia (at-oks-o-fo'-be-ah) [ira^la, want of order; «£A(3oj. fear]. I. Excessive dread of disorder. 9. Morbid dread of suffering from loco motor ataxia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ataxophobia (ah-taks-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. ira(la disorder + ipdffos fear]. Morbid or insane dread of disorder.
  287. ataxy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ataxy (at-aks'-e). See ataxia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ataxy (at-ak'se). Same as ataxia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ataxy (at-ak'se). Same as ataxia.
  288. ateliosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ateliosis (ah-te-le-o'sis) [Gr. a neg. + riXeto? complete]. Defective development; arrest of development so that the person does not arrive at perfection of development.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ateliosis (ah-te-le-o'sis) [Gr. a neg. + reXtios complete]. Defective development; arrest of development so that the person does not arrive at perfection of development.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ateliosis (at-el-I-o'sis) [G. ateles, incomplete.] Incomplete development of the mind or the body or any of its parts; infantilism.
  289. athermancy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      athermancy (ah-thur'-man-se) [ddip/twroi. not heated]. The state of being impervious to radiant heat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      athermancy (ah-ther'man-se). The state of being athermanous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      athermancy (ah-ther'man-se). The state of being athermanous.
  290. athermanous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      athermanous (ah-ther'-man-us). Impervious to radiant heat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      athermanous (ah-ther'man-us) [Gr. a neg. + Bipiai heat]. Absorbing heat-rays and not permitting them to pass.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ather'manous. Absorbing radiant heat, not permeable to heat rays.
  291. athermic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      athermic (ah-thcr'mik) [Gr. a neg. + Bipiiv heat]. Without fever or rise of temperature.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      athermic (ah-ther'mic). Unaccompanied by fever; apyretic. [Gr., a, priv., + therme, heat.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      athermic (ah-ther'rnik) [Gr. a neg. + Okpiai heat]. Without fever or rise of temperature.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ather'mic. Apyretic.
  292. atheromatosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atheromatosis. A more or less generalized atheromatous condition of the arteries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atheromatosis (ath"er-o-mat-o'sis). An atheromatous condition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atheromatosis (ath"er-o-mat-o'sis). An atheromatous condition.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ath"eromato'sis. A more or less generalized atheromatous disease of the arteries.
  293. atheromatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atheromatous (ath-er-o'-ntal-us) [see r.iheroma], Characterized by or affected with atheroma. a. abscess. See abscess, atheromatous. a. ulcer, an ulcer formed by the abscess breaking through the intima.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atheromatous (ath-er-o'mat-us). Affected with, or of the nature of, atheroma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      athero'matous. Relating to or affected by atheroma.
  294. athrepsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      athrepsia (ah-threps'-c-ah) [A. priv.; rpk+u*, to nourish]. Malnutrition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      athrepsia (ah-threp'se-ah) [Gr. o neg. + Bpeipis nutrition]. Insufficient nutrition of infants.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      athrepsia (ah-threp'se-ah) [Gr. o neg. + Bptyif nutrition), i. Insufficient nutrition of infants. • Ehrlich's term for immunity to tumor inoculation due to a supposed lack of the special nutritive material necessary for tumor growth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      athrep'sia [G. a- priv. + thrcpsis, nourishment.] i. Innutrition; specifically, marasmus of the newborn. 2. Immunity to inoculation of tumor cells, assumed by Ehrlich to be due to the absence of the special nutritive substance upon which the growth of tumors was supposed by him to depend.
  295. atlantad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atlantad (at-lan'-tad) [See «."•:••]'. Toward the atlas in situation or direction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atlan'tad. In a direction toward the atlas.
  296. atlantal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atlantal (at-lan'-lal) [See atlas]. Relating to the atlas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atlantal (at-lan'tal). Pertaining to the atlas.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atlan'tal. Relating to the atlas.
  297. atmolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atmolysis (at-mol'-is-is) [atmo-; XtVis, loosing). A method of separating the ingredients of mixed gases or vapors by means of their different diffusibility through a porous substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atmolysis (at-mol'is-is) [Gr. irpM vapor + \h loosing]. 1. The separation of mixed gases by pa ing through a porous plate, the more diffusil passing through first. 2. The disintegration organic tissue by the fumes of volatile fluids, su as benzin. ether, alcohol, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atmolysis (at-mol'is-is) [Gr. arpm vapor + Xforu loosing]. i. The separation of mixed gases by passing through a porous plate, the more diffusible passing through first. 2. The disintegration of organic tissue by the fumes of volatile fluids, such as benzin, ether, alcohol, etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atmol'ysis. The separation of mixed gases, such as the air, by passing them through a porous diaphragm, the most diffusible gas passing through first.
  298. atonicity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atonicity (at-on-is'-il-e}. Lack of tone, atony.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atonicity (at-on-is'it-e). Atonic quality.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atonicity (at-o-nisl-tl). Atony, lack of tone. at'onied. Atonic, marked by lack of tone. ai'ony [G. atonia, languor.] Relaxation, flaccidity;
  299. atoxic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atoxic (ah-toks'-ik) [4, priv.; r^uror, poison]. Not venomous; not poisonous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atoxic (ah-tok'sik) [Gr. a neg. + To£«6»' poison). Not poisonous; not due to a poison.
  300. atrabiliary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atrabiliary (at-rah-bil'-e-a-re) [alra. black; bilis, bile]. Pertaining to black bile, gloomy, melancholic, a. capsules, an old name for the suprarenal capsules.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atrabiliary (at-rah-bil'e-a-re) [L. afro black i bi'lis bile]. Pertaining to black bile. See capsule, atrabiliary.
  301. atrichosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'-sis) lse« atrichia}. A condition characterized by absence of hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'sis). Same as atrichia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'sis). Same as alrichia.
  302. atrophia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atrophia (at-ro'-fe-ah). See atrophy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atrophia (at-ro-pi'na). Same as atropin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atrophia (ah-tro'fe-ah) [L., from Gr. a neg. -f Tpoifr/i nourishment]. Latin for atrophy, a. cu'tis. See alrophoderma. a. in fan turn, tabes mesenterica. a. inaculo sa cu'tiB (Jadassohn). See anelodermia. a. nwsentor'ica, tabes mesenterica. a. mnsculo rum lipomato sa, pscudohypertrophic muscular paralysis. See under paralysis, a. pile'rum pro'pria, atrophy of the hair. a. testic'uli, wasting of the testicle, a. un'guium, atrophy of the nails.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atro'phia [G. a- priv. + trophS, nourishment.] Atrophy, a. infan'tum, tabes mesenterica. a. musculo'rum lipomato'sa, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, a. pilo'rum pro'pria, trichorrhexis nodosa.
  303. attenuant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      attenuant (al-en'-u-ant) [attenuare, to make thin). i. A medicine or agent increasing the fluidity or thinness of the blood or other secretion. 2. A diluent. 3. Lessening the effect of an agent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      attenuant (at-en'u-ant). 1. Causing thinness, of the blood. 2. A medicine that thins the bk
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      attenuant (at-en'u-ant). i. Causing thinness, as of the blood. 2. A medicine that thins the blood.
  304. attrahens - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      attrahens (at'-ra-hent) [L., "drawing"]. Drawing forward, as attrahens aurem, a muscle drawing the ear forward and upward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      attrahens (at'rah-henz) [L. for "drawing toward"], a. au'rem. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      att'rahens [L. attrahert, to attract.] Drawing toward, noting a muscle (attrahetts aurftn or auriculam) rudimentary in man, which tends to draw the pinna of the ear forward; musculus auricularis anterior [BNA].
  305. audiphone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      audiphone (aw'-dif-dn) \audirt, to hear; 0w»^, a sound]. An Instrument for improving the power of hearing by conveying sounds through the bones of the head to the labyrinth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      audiphone (aw/dif-«n) [L. audi're to hear i Gr. .,•••1,1 voice]. A device for aiding the deaf to hear.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      audiphone (aw'de-fon) [L. audire, to hear, + G. phone, sound.] A fan-shaped piece of vulcanite, the upper edge of which is pressed against the upper teeth; collecting the sound waves, it transmits them to the auditory apparatus by bone-conduction.
  306. augmentor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      augmentor (aing-men'-tor). An agent which Increases or accelerates the action of auxetlcs; by itself it Is unable to produce cell division. See auxetic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor). 1. Increasing: applied to nerves or nerve-cells concerned in increasing the size and force of heart contractions. 2. A substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor). i. Increasing: applied to nerves or nerve-cells concerned in increasing the size and force of heart contractions. 2. A substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor) [L. augmentum, increase.] A hypothetical substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic or a kinetic, a. nerves, accelerator nerves, called augmentor because their action is to increase the force as well as the rapidity of the heart beat.
  307. aurantia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurantia (aw-ron'-she-ah) [aurantium]. i. An orange coal-tar dye; an ammonium salt of hexanitrodiphenylamine. 2. An orange or oranges.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurantia (aw-ran'she-ah). An orange coal-tar stain.
  308. aurantium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurantium (aw-ran'-she-urn) [L.; gen., aurantii], Orange. The fruit of Citrus vulgarii and C. aurantinm. Both the flowers and the rind of the fruit are employed in medicine, aurantii amari cortex (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel, aurantii amari, fluidertracrum (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel, alcohol, and water. It is used as a flavor. Dose J-i dr. (2-4 Cc.). aurantii amari, tinctura (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel. 20; dilute alcohol, q. s. ad 100. Dose i-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.)- aurantii corticis, oleum (U. S. P.), the volatile oil expressed from the rind of the orange; it is aromatic and a mild tonic, but U used mainly as a flavor. Dose 1-5 drops, aurantii dulcis cortex (U. S. P.), sweet orange-peel, aurantii dulcis, tinctura (U. S. P.). sweet orange-peel, 20; dilute alcohol, q. s. ad 100. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, elixir, oil of orange-peel, i; sugar, 100; alcohol and water, q. s. ad 300. aurantii florum, aqua (U. S. P.), §trorn;er orange-flower water and distilled water, of each, i volume, aurantii florum fortior, aqua (U. S. P.). water saturated with the volatile oil of fresh orange-flowers, aurantii florum, oleum, oil of neroli. a volatile oil distilled from fresh orangeflowers. Doee 1-5 drops, aurantii florum, syrupus (U. S. P.), sugar, 85; orange-flower water, sufficient to make zoo parts. A common flavoring agent, aurentit. infusum (B. P ). Dose x-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). auxantii, infusum, comppsitum (B. P.). Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.}. surantii, spiritus, oil of orange-peel. 5; deodorized alcohol, 95. Dose according to quantity of alcohol desired, aurantii, spiritus, compositus (U- S. P.), oil of orange-peel, 20; oil of lemon, 5; ofl of coriander, 2; oil of anise, 5; deodorized alcohol, su Sicient to make ioo parts, aurantii, syrupus (U. S. P.), tincture of sweet orange-peel, s; citric acid. 0.5; magnesium carbonate, i; sugar. 82; water sufficient to make 100 parts, aurantii, tinctura (B. P.). Doae 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, tinctura, rMentis (B. P.), tincture of fresh orange-peel. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, vinum (B. P.). contains 12 % of alcohol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurantium (aw-ran'she-um) [L. for "orange"; gen. ,(.•(.-,•,.'/;,] See orange, a. ama'ruiu cortex, the peel or rind of the bitter (unripe) orange. a. dul'ce cor'tex, the rind of the sweet (ripe) orange.
  309. auricularis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      auricularis (aw-rik-u-la'-ris) [see auricle], i. Auricular. 2. The extensor minimi digiti. See under muscle, a. magnus, a branch of the cervical plexus of nerves.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      auricularis (aw-rik-u-lah'ris) [L. auricular.] i. The little finger, so called because used to clean the auditory meatus. 2. Nervus* auricularis magnus.
  310. aurilave - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurilave (aw'-ril-av) [n;trist the ear; lavare, to wash]. An appliance for cleansing the ears. An ear-brush or ear -sponge mounted upon a handle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aurilave (aw'ril-iv) [L. au'ris ear + lava're to wash]. An apparatus for washing out or cleaning the ear.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurilave (aw'ril-av) [L. m'ris ear + lava're to wash]. An apparatus for washing out or cleaning the ear.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aurilave (aw'ri-lav) [L. auris, ear, -I- lavare, to wash.] A brush or sponge on the end of a slender rod, for cleaning the ear.
  311. aurinasal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurinasal (aw-re-na'-sal) [auris; warns, nose]. Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aurinasal (aw-rin-a'sal). Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurinasal (aw-rin-a'sal). Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aurinasal (aw-ri-na'zal) [L. auris, ear, + nasus, nose.] Relating to the ear and the nose.
  312. auto-analysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      auto-analysis (aw-to-an-al'is-is). The analysi
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      auto-analysis (aw-to-an-al'is-is). The analysis and interpretation, on the part of a nervous patient, of the state of mind underlying his disorder: employed as a means of treatment.
  313. autogenetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autogenetic (aw-to-jtn-ef-ik) [see autogenesis]. Produced within the organism.
  314. autographism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autographism (aw-log'-raf-im) [auto-; -)pi0tu>, to write]. The condition observed in the so-called autographic skin; dermographism. See urticaria factitia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      autographism (aw-tog'raf-izm) [Gr. aurot self + ypaiptm to write]. A hysteric state in which marks of words written upon the skin leave more or less persistent traces.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autog'raphism. Dermographism.
  315. autoimmunization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autoimmunization (av.'-to-im-u-ni-sa'-shurt) [auto-; immunization]. Immunization obtained by natural processes at work within the body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autoimmunization (aw*to-im-u-ni-za'shun). The natural process of immunization against a disease effected by an attack of the same.
  316. autolysate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autolysate {aw-lol'-is-al) [see aulolysin]. That which results from or Is produced by autolysis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      autolysate (aw-tol'is-at). A specific substance produced by autolysis. Autolysates of cancer tissue have been used subcutaneously in the treatment of cancer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autolysate (aw-tol'i-sat). The specific product of autolysis.
  317. autolysin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autolysin (aw-lol'-is-in) [auto-; XiV«, a loosing], A lysin capable of dissolving the red blood-corpuscles of the animal in the serum of which it circulates.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      autolysin (aw-tol'is-in). 1. A lysin present in an organism and capable of destroying the cells or tissues of that organism. 2. A proprietary solution containing non-toxic vegetable proteins: used in the treatment of cancer.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      autolysin (aw-tol'is-in). i. A lysin present in an organism and capable of destroying the cells or tissues of that organism. 2. A proprietary solution containing non-toxic vegetable proteins: used in the treatment of cancer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autol'ysin. An hemolysin in the plasma which will destroy the blood cells of the same individual.
  318. automatograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      automatograph (aw-to-mat'-o-graf) [alirouciTtftir, to act spontaneously; ->p, to record]. An instrument for registering involuntary Movements.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      automatograph (aw-to-mat'o-graf) [Gr. a£rro,uarta/j6t automatism 4~ yp&tfxiv to write). An instrument for recording involuntary movements.
  319. automysophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      automysophobia (aw-to-mis-o-fo'-bc-ah) [auto; riaai. filth; &&h, fear]. Insane dread of personal uncleanliness.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      automysophobia (aw"to-mis-o- fo'be-ab'. A form of phobia characterized by a dread of personal uncleanliness. [Gr, autos, self, + mysos, dirt, + photws. fear.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      automysophobia (aw"to-mis-o-fo'be-ab) [Gr. airrbs self + myiophobia]. Insane dread of personal uncleanness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      automysophobia (aw-to-mi-so-fo'bl-ah) [G. autos, self, + mysos, dirt, + phobos, fear.] An insane imagining that one is filthy or smells bad.
  320. autophony - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autophony (o»-lo/'-o-«) [see auluphanons], I. The auscultation of the physician's own voice through, the patient's chest. 2. The condition in which one's own voice appears changed. It may be due to chronic inflammation of the ear or to other causes.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      autophony (aw-to'fo-ne). The altered resonance of one's own voice, noted in cases of diseases of the middle ear. [Gr.. autos, self, + plume, voice.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autophony (aw-tof'o-nl) [G. autos, self, + fhini, sound.] Increased resonance of one's own voice, breath sounds, arterial murmurs, etc., noted especially in disease of the middle ear or of the nasal fossas; tympanophonia.
  321. autoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autoscope (aw'-to-skdp) [auto-; atowtif, to see]. An instrument arranged for the examination of one s own organs by one's self.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autoscope (aw'to-skop) [G. autos, self, + skopeo, I inspect.] i. Any instrument used in the visual examination of one's own organs or cavities, 2. A long concave spatula used to depress and drag forward the tongue in the process of direct inspection of the larynx.
  322. autosite - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autosite (ow'-to-sll) [auto-; airat, food], i. A monster capable of an Independent existence after birth. 2. That member of a double fetal monstrosity that nourishes itself by its own organs and also the other member, which is railed the parasite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      autosite (aw-to-sit) [Gr. abr/n self + atrm food], i. A monster or teratism capable of independent life. 2. A teratism upon or within which a parasitic twin lives.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autosite (aw'to-sit) [G. autos, self, + siios, food.] i. The principal twin in a double monstrosity; the one which carries on the vital processes, nourishing itself as well as the lesser twin, or parasite, a. A single monster with organs sufficiently developed to be capable of postnatal existence.
  323. autosuggestibility - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autosuggestibility (aw-to-suj-es-tib-il'^it-e). That mental state with loss of will, in which auto suggestion easily occurs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      autosuggestibility (aw"to-sug-jes-tib-il'it-e). A peculiar mental state with loss of will, in which suggestions become easy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autosuggestibility (aw"to-sug-jes"ti-bil1-tl). An unstable mental state in which autosuggestion readily occurs.
  324. autotoxemia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      au"totoxe'mia. Poisoning by the absorp
  325. autovaccination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autovaccination (aw-to-vaks-in-a'-skun) [auto-; vacfinare, to vaccinate]. The reinsertion of fresh vaccine lymph upon the same person from whom it is taken.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      autovaccination (aw"to-vak-sin-a'shun). The vaccination of a patient with his own virus.
  326. auxanography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      auxanography (awks-an-og'-ra-Je). A method devised by Beyerinck for ascertaining the nutrient mediums suitable for a growing microbe. Plate cultures of poor mediums (e. g., 10 % gelatin or 2 % agar in distilled water) are stippled with drops of solutions the nutrient properties of which are to be tested. The species of microbe under examination will then develop strong colonies only on those spots where the requisite pabulum is present.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      auxanography (awks-an-og'raf-e) [Gr. aii^avtiv to grow + ypaiftiv to write]. A method of determining the most suitable medium for a microbe by placing drops of various solutions on a plate culture of a poor medium. The microbe will develop the strongest colonics on that spot which contains the best medium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      auxanography (awks-an-og'raf-e) [Gr. ad^avav to grow -f- ypatptur to write). A method of determining the most suitable medium for a microbe by placing drops of various solutions on a plate culture of a poor medium. The microbe will develop the strongest colonies on that spot which contains the best medium.
  327. avenin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      avenin (av-e'-nin) [arena]. I. A precipitate made from a tincture of Atena saliva, or the oat. It is a nerve-stimulant and tonic. 2. A nitrogenous principle obtained from the oat, and nearly Identical withlegumin; the gluten-casein of oats.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      avenin (av-e'nin). 1. A stimulant and tonic preparation from oats. 2. A principle like casein, obtainable from oats.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      avenin (av-e'nin). i. A stimulant and tonic preparation from oats. 2. A principle like casein, obtainable (rom oats.
  328. avivement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      avivement (ah-viv-maw'). The operative refreshing of the edges of a wound.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      avivement (ah-vev-maw'). The operative refreshing of the edges of a wound.
  329. axifugal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      axifugal (ak-sif'u-gal) [L. ax'is axis + fu'grre to flee]. Centrifugal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      axif'ugal[L axis + fugere, to flee from.] Centrifugal.
  330. axin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      axin (aks'-in) [axinus]. A fatty and varnish-like substance produced in Mexico by an insect. Coccus axinus. It is used in the arts and locally in medicine, being regarded as a good vulnerary and resolvent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      axin (ak'sin). A varnish-like substance from an insect, Lac'cus ax'inus: vulnerary and resolvent.
  331. axungia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      axungia (ax-un'je-ah). Lit., axle grease; as now used, any animal fat, particularly lard. a. anscrina, a. anseris. Goosegrease, official in several old formularies and still used as a remedy, especially in skin diseases, a. balsamica, a. benzofltn, a. benzolnata. Benzoinated lard. a. mineralis. Petrolatum, a. pod urn tauri. Neat's foot oil. a. porci. Hog's lard. a. scrofae, a. suilla. Hog's lard. [Lat., axis, an axle, + ungere, to smear.]