User:Visviva/Medical/By links/A

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  1. acor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      acor (a'-kor) [L.]. Acrimony: acidity, as of the stomach.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      a'cor [L. a sour taste.] Gastric acidity, pyrosis.
  2. acrisia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      acrisia (ah-kris'-t-ah) [4, priv.; crisis]. The absence of a crisis from a disease; an unfavorable crisis or turn in the course of an attack of disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      acrisia (a-kris'I-ah) [G. a- priv. + krisis, judgment.] A condition in which diagnosis and especially prognosis are uncertain.
  3. adipositas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      adipositas (ad-ip-os'-il-as) [L.]. Fatness; corpulency, a. cordis, a fatty condition of the heart, a. liniversa'lis, obesity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adipositas (ad-ip-os'it-as) [L.]. Fatness, a. cerebra'lis. See cerebral adiposity, under adiposity, a. cor'dis. See fatty heart, 2d def. a. ex vacuo, fatty atrophy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adipositas (ad-I-pos'l-tas). Adiposis, adiposity. a. ex vac'uo, fatty atrophy.*
  4. adminiculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      adminiculum (ad-min-ik'u-lum) [LJ. 1. A support. 2. The expansion of fibers extending from the superior pubic ligament to the posterior surface of the linea alba. Called also a. lin'eie al'btr.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      adminic'ulum [L. prop, stay.] i. That which gives support to a part. a. Adjuvant, a. lin'ese al'bce, a triangular fibrous expansion, sometimes containing a few muscular fibers, passing from the superior pubic ligament to the posterior surface of the linea alba.
  5. afferentia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      afferentia (af-er-en'she-ab) [L.]. i. Any afferent vessels, whether blood- or lymph-vessels. ». The lymph-vessels in general.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      afferentia (S-fer-en'sM-ah) [L.] Vasa afferentia, afferent vessels; specifically the afferent* arteries of the kidneys.
  6. agamont - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      agamont (ah'gam-ont) [Gr. a not + -y 0/105 marriage + uf being]. Same as sckizonl.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ag'amont [G. a- priv. + gamos, marriage, + dn(ont-), being.] A non-sexual spore-like body forming one of the stages in the life-cycle of certain parasitic protozoans.
  7. agoniadin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      agoniadin (ag-on-i'-ad-in), ('i.iHuOs. A glucoside found in Agonia bark, and used as an antiperiodic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      agoni'adin. A glucoside, Cj0H14O obtained from the bark of Plumeria lancifolia and other species of P.; employed as a febrifuge in malaria in doses of gr. 2-4 (0.12-0.25).
  8. akoria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      akoria (ah-ko're ah). See acoria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      akoria (ah-ko're ah). See acoria.
  9. albuminone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      albuminone (al-bu'-min-on) [albumin]. A principle derived from certain albuminoids; it is soluble in alcohol and is not coagulable by heat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      albuminone (al-bu'min-on). A principle from various albuminoids, soluble in alcohol and not coagulated by heat.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      albu'minone. Albumone.
  10. allelomorphism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      allelomorphism (al-el-o-moKfizm). The existence or the transmission of allelomorphic characters.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      allelomorphism (al'e-lo-morTizm). The transmission by heredity of allelomorphic characters.
  11. alpha-naphthol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alpha-naphthol (al-fah-naf'thol). A non-offidal variety of naphthol. See naphthol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alpha-naphthol (al-fah-naf'thol). A non-official variety of naphthol. Sec naphthol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alpha-naph'thol. A substance obtained from coaltar and prepared artificially, a colorless crystalline powder; employed as an intestinal antiseptic in typhoid fever and other conditions in doses of gr. 10-15 (0-6—r.o), also externally in oily solution, in scarlet fever, erysipelas, and smallpox.
  12. aluminosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aluminosis (al-u-min-o'-sus) {alum; *txrm. disease]. A chronic catarrhal inflammation of the lungs found in pottery workers.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alumino'sis. A chronic catarrhal affection of the respiratory passages occurring in workers in alum.
  13. alypin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      alypin (al'-*-pin). The hydrochloride of tetramethyl-diamino-dimethyl-ethyl-carbinol-benzpate. It is a synthetic preparation, similar to cocaine and stovaine, and is used as a local anesthetic. It is less toxic than cocaine. For the eye and urethra, a 2 per cent stolution is used; elsewhere, a stronger solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      alypin (al-i'pin). A glycerin derivative, C|„Hj,Ojhjnci, used as a local anesthetic, especially in eye operations. Locally it is used in a 10 per cent, solution; for the eye, in 1 to 2 per cent, solution, and hypodermicatly, in 1 to 4 per cent, solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      alypin (al-i'pin). A glycerin derivative, C<«H%r ' used as a local anesthetic, especially in
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      alypin (al'I-pin). A synthetic crystalline powder soluble in water and alcohol; a local anesthetic, similar to, but less toxic than cocaine; used in 0.5-2 per cent, solutions; is not mydriatic. Chemically it is benzoyltetramethyl-diaminoethyl-dimethyl-carbinol hydrochloride.
  14. amaril - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amaril (am'-ar-il) [Sp.. amarillo, yellow]. The poison induced by Bacillus icteroides.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amaril (am'ar-il) [Sp. amoril'io yellow]. The iwison generated by the Bacil'lus icleroi'des, and believed to be active in inducing yellow fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amaril (am'ar-il) [Sp. amaril'la yellow]. The poison generated by the Bacil'lus icteroi'des, and believed to be active in inducing yellow fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      am'aril [Sp. amarilio, yellow.] The toxin of Sanarelli's bacillus, B. icterodes, at one time asserted to be the specific organism of yellow fever.
  15. amarum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amarum (am-a'-rum) [see amara]. i. A bitter. 2. Magnesium sulphate, a., genuine, magnesium sulphate, a. purum, any simple bitter.
  16. ambon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ambon (am'-bon) [A^uc, the Up of a cup]. The fibrocartilaginous ring that surrounds a socket in which the head of a large bone is received, such as the acetabulum, or the glenoid cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ambon (am'bon). The edge of the sockets in which the heads of long bones are lodged.
  17. amido- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amido- (am'-id-o). A prefix denoting a chemical compound containing the univalent radical NHj.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amido-. A prefix in chemic names, indicating that the substance represented by the latter part of the name is modified by the substitution of the radical NH3 for hydrogen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amido-. A prefix in chemic names, indicating that the substance represented by the latter part of the name is modified by the substitution of the radical Mi, for hydrogen.
  18. amidulin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amidulin (am-id'-u-lin) (see amidine]. Soluble starch; prepared by the action of H?SO* on starch, thus removing the starch-cellulose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amidulin (am-id'u-lin). The granulose of starch freed from its envelop of amyloccllulose by the action of hydrochloric acid; soluble starch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      amidulin (am-id'u-lin). The granulose of starch freed from its envelop of amylocellulose by the action of hydrochloric acid; soluble starch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amid'ulin [Fr. amidon, starch.] Soluble starch, so rendered by boiling or treating with hydrochloric acid.
  19. amorpha - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amorpha (ah-morf-ah) [4. priv.; uop&i, shape].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      amorpha (ah-mor'fah) [Gr. a neg. 4- uoptpfi form]. Diseases that evince no definite pathologic changes.
  20. amorphus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amorphus (ah-mor'-fus) [4. priv.; pop^4, a form]. An acardiacus without head or extremities. See also anideus. a. globulus, see anideus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amor'phus. An acardiac monster without limbs or other recognizable features.
  21. amphibolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphibolia (am-fe-bo'-lt-ah) [iM*i0<Ain. uncertainty). The vacillating period of a fever or disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphibolia [G. uncertainty.] A stage in the course of a disease in which the outcome appears uncertain.
  22. amphoricity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amphoricity (am-for-is'-i-te') [amphoric]. The quality of being amphoric; the giving forth of amphoric sounds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amphoricity (am-for-isl-tl). A condition in which amphoric sounds are obtained on auscultation or percussion.
  23. amyelotrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyelotrophy (ah-mi-el-ot'-ro-fe) [4, priv.; uoM*, marrow; rpo^ii, nourishment]. Atrophy of the spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyelotrophy (a-mi-el-ot'ro-fl). Myelatrophy.
  24. amygdaline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amygdaline (am-ig'-dal-ln) [see amygdala]. I. Almond-like. 2. Pertaining to the tonsil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amygdaline (a-mig'dah-len, or 1m). i. Relating to an almond. 2. Relating to a tonsil, especially to the brain structure called amygdala or amygdaloid nucleus, a. fis'sure, incisura temporalis, a fissure on the ventral aspect of the temporal lobe near its pole.
  25. amygdalitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dul-i'-tis} [amygdala; tru, inflammation]. Tonsillitis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dal-i'tis). Any inflammation of the tonsil. [Gr., amygdale, almond (popular term for tonsil), + itis, inflammation.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amygdalitis (am-ig-dal-i'(e')tis) [G. amygdali, tonsil, + -itis.] Tonsillitis, inflammation of a tonsil.
  26. amylamine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amylamine (.am-il'-am-in). See isoamylamine. a. hydrochlorate, CiHuNCl, a reaction-product of amyl cyanate, potassium hydrate, and hydrochloric acid, occurring as deliquescent scales or crystals. It is an antipyretic. Dose 7-15 gr. (0.45-1.0 Gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amylamine (am-il-am'en). i. A colorless liquid, CsHnNHi, obtained in various ways, found sometimes in codliver oil. 2. One of a series of amino-compounds of amyl, in which one or more atoms of H in the ammonia are replaced by a corresponding number of molecules of the amyl radical.
  27. amyosthenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyosthenic (am-i-o-sthen'-ik) [A, priv.; Mj't. muscle; (rt»<*o», force]. Pertaining to amyosthenia. Also, a medicine or agent depressing muscular action.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      amyosthen'ic. Relating to or causing muscular weakness.
  28. amyxorrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      amyxorrhea (am-iks-o-re1'-ah) [A, priv.; nv£a, mucus; fata, flow]. Absence of the normal mucous secretion.
  29. anabiotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anabiotic (an-ab~i-ol'-ik) [Ai-A, again; 0i«4t. life). I. Relating to anabiosis. 3. Restoring the strength or activity.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      anabiot'ic. Apparently lifeless, but capable of living.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anabiotic (an-ah-bi-ot'ik). Lifeless, but still capable of living.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anabiot'ic. i. Resuscitating, restorative, i. Arevivifying remedy, a powerful stimulant.
  30. anadicrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anadicrotic (an-ah-di-krot'-ik) [ApA, up; 6tt, twice; icp6rof, a stroke). Characterized by anadicrotism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anadicrotic (an-ah-di-krot'ik) [G. ana, up, + dikrotos, double beating.] Noting a sphygmographic tracing in which two beats are marked on the ascending line.
  31. analgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      analgic (an-al'-jik) [see analgen]. Analgesic. " L (an-al'-jin). Synonym of creolin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      analgic (an-al'jik). Insensible to pain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anal'gic. Without pain.
  32. anapeiratic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anapeiratic {on-ap-i-rat'~ik) ... to do agiin]. A condition due to excessive exercise, as in writers' cramp.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anapeiratic (an-ah-pi-rat'ik) [Gr. &vaweipaa9ai to do again]. Due to excessive use.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anapeiratic (an"ah-pi-rat'ik) [G. anafeiraomai, I try again.] Resulting from overuse, noting certain occupation neuroses.
  33. anapnometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anapnom'eter [G. anapnol, respiration, + metron, measure.] Spirometer; an instrument for measuring the force of the respiratory movements.
  34. anatriptic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anatriptic (an-at-rip'-tik) [see anotripsis}. A medicine to be applied by rubbing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anatriptic (an-at-rip'tik) [Gr. avdrptirrof rubbed up]. A medicine applied by rubbing.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anatrip'tic [G. anatrtptos, rubbed up.] A remedy to be applied by friction or inunction.
  35. anconagra - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anconagra (ang-kon-a'-gratfi [dvic&w, the elbow. 47pn, a seizure]. Arthritic pain at the elbow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anconagra (an-kon-ag'rah. an-kon'ag-rah) [Gr. AyKwv elbow -\- &ypa seizure], (jout of the elbow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anconagra (an-kon-ag'rah, an-kon'ag-rah) [Gr. iytiav elbow -f- typo, seizure]. Gout of the elbow.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anconagra (ang-ko-nag'rah) [G. ankdn, elbow, + agra, a seizure.] Gout in the elbow.
  36. anconitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anconitis (an-ko-ni'tis). Inflammation of the elbow-joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anconitis (an-ko-ni'tis). Inflammation of the elbow-joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anconitis (ang-ko-ni'(ne')tis) [G. ankdn, elbow, +
  37. ancyroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ancyroid (an'sir-oid) [Gr. iyxvpa anchor + elSos form]. Shaped like an anchor or hook.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ancyroid (an'sir-oid) [Gr. Hynvpa anchor -f «ljos form). Shaped like an anchor or hook.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'cyroid [G. ankyra, anchor, + eidos, resemblance.] Ankyroid, shaped like the fluke of an anchor, noting the cornua of the lateral ventricles of the brain and the coracoid process of the scapula.
  38. androgynus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      androgynus (an-droj'-in-us) *see androgyna]. A hermaphrodite. A male with genital organs similar to those of the female.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      androgynus (an-droj'en-us) [Gr. ia^p man + ywit woman]. A hermaphrodite: also an effeminate man.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      androgynus (an-droj'i-nus) [G. anSr, a man, + gyne, a, woman.] An hermaphrodite.
  39. anepiploic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anepiploic (an-ep-ip-lo'-ik) [to, priv.; MirXoov, the caul]. Having no epiploon or omentum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anepiploic (an-ep-e-plo'ik). Devoid of omentum.
  40. anethene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      an'ethene. A hydrocarbon, CioHw, found in oil of dill.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anethene (an'eth-«n). A hydrocarbon, C10H,,, from oil of dill.
  41. anginophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anginophobia (an-ji-no-fo'-be-ah) [angina; $60fear]. Morbid fear of angina pectoris.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anginophobia (an-jin-o-fo'be-ah) [angina -+■ Gr. i^orfos fear]. Morbid dread of angina pectoris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anginopho'bia [angina + G. phobos, fear.] Extreme fear of an attack of angina pectoris.
  42. angiospasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angiospasm (an'-jc-o-spazm) [angio-; anao^iAs, a fipasmj. A vasomotor spasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'giospasm [G. angeion, vessel, + spasmos, tension.] A condition of spasmodic, contraction of the muscular coats of the smaller arteries, causing an increase in blood-pressure; angiohypertonus.
  43. angitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angitis (an-ji'-lis). See angiitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angitis (an-ji'tis). Same as angiitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      angitis (an-ji'(je')tis). Angiitis.
  44. angustura - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      angustura. See angoslura.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      angustura (ang-us-tu'rah) [Sp. Angostura, "narrows," a town of Venezuela]. The bark of Galipr'n cuspa'ria, a tree of South America. It is a bitter tonic and stimulant: used in dysentery
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      angustu'ra. Angostura.
  45. anios - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anios (an'e-os). A proprietary greenish liquid, us as an antiseptic and disinfectant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anios (ant-os). Trade name of a preparation of formaldehyde with phenol, used as an antiseptic.
  46. anisum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anisum (an'-is-um) [L.]. Anise. The fruit of Pimpinella anisum. Its properties are due to a volatile oil. It is slightly stimulant to the heart action. It liquefies bronchial secretions, and is therefore a favorite ingredient in cough-mixtures. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.65-1.3 Gm.). anisi, aqua (U. S. P.). oil of anise, i; water, 500 parts. Dose indefinite, anisi, essentia (B. P.). Dose 10-20 min. (0.6-1.2 Cc.). anisi, oleum (U. S. P.), an ingredient in tinctura opii camphorata. Dose 1-5 min. (0.06-0.3 Gm.). anisi, spiritus (U. S. P.), a 10 % solution of the oil in alcohol. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anisum (an-i'sum), gen. ani'si. Latin for anise.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ani'sum (U.S.), ani'si fruc'tus (Br.) [G. anison, anise, dill.] Anise, the fruit of Pimpinella anisum; aromatic and carminative. The aqua, oleum, and spiritus are official.
  47. ankyroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ankyroid (ang'-kir-oid) [Sr«/0a. a hook]. Hookehaped. a. cavity, in the brain, the posterior or descending cornu of the lateral ventricle, a. process, the coracoid process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ankyroid (ang'ki-royd) [G. ankyra, hook, + eidos, shape.] Hook-shaped.
  48. annotto - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      annotto (an-ot'-o) [native American]. A coloringmatter obtained from the pellicles of the seeds of Bixa orellana. It is used to color plasters and butter. Syn., annattn; arnotlo.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      annot'to. Also arnotta, arnolto, and annatto. A reddish coloring matter derived from the pulp of iii.ru orellana, a tree of tropical America.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      annott'o. Arnotto.
  49. annuens - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      annuens (an'-u-ens) [annuere, to nod]. The rectua capitis anticus minor muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ann'uens [L. annuere, to nod to.] Musculus rectus capitis anterior.
  50. anoci-association - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anoci-association (ah-no'-se-as-o-se-a'-shun). The condition in which pain, fear, shock, and neuroses are blocked, and so excluded, hi surgical cases.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anoci-association (3-no'sI-as-so-sl-a'shun) [G. a, priv.] A condition in which all noci*-associations are excluded, thus preventing fear, pain, shock, and postoperative neuroses in cases of surgical operations or trauma.
  51. anoesia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anoesia (an-o-e'-se-ah) [^vo^aia, a want of sense). Want of understanding.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anoe'sia (an-o-e'ze-ah) [Gr. AyoiprlaJ. Want of understanding; idiocy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anoesia (an-o-e'sl-ah) [G. anofsia, from a- priv. + noos, perception.] Idiocy, imbecility, lack of the power of comprehension.
  52. anophthalmus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anophthalmus (an-of-lhal'-mus). See anophlhalmos.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anophthal'mus [G. an- priv. + ophthalmos, eye.] i. Congenital absence of an eye, its place being taken by a small solid or cystic body. 2. A monster without eyes.
  53. anosmatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anosmatic (an-dz-mat'-ik) [A», priv.; 4a/»t), smell]. I. With small olfactory lobes. 2. Not having a keen sense of smell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anosmat'ic. Relating to anosmia.
  54. antapoplectic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antapoplectic (ant-ap-o-plek'-lik) \nnti-; «-.n.\vJia. apoplexy]. Efficient in preventing or treating apoplexy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antapoplectic (ant"ap-o-plek'tik) [Gr. ia>Ti against + AiroirX»)£(o apoplexy]. Good against apoplexy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antapoplec'tic [G. anti, against.] Having a supposed power to prevent apoplexy or relieve its effects.
  55. antatrophic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antatrophic (ani-ai-rcf'-ik) [ant-; arpo^a. wasting], I. Preventing atrophy. 2. A drug that will prevent wasting or atrophy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antatrophic (ant-at-rof'ik). Correcting or opposing the progress of atrophy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antatroph'ic [G. anti, against. + atrophia.] i. Preventing or curing atrophy. 2. An agent which promotes the restoration of atrophied structures.
  56. anthracin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthracin (an'-thras-in) [anthrax]. A toxic ptomaine derived from pure cultures of the bacillus of anthrax.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthracin (an'thras-in). A poisonous ptomain from anthrax cultures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'thracin. i. Anthracene. 2. A toxin of the anthrax bacillus.
  57. anthroposomatology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      anthroposomatology (an-thro-Po-so-mat-olr-o-je) [anthropo^; v&pa, body; \byot, science]. The sum of what is known regarding the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      anthroposomatology (an"thro-po-so-mat-oro-je) [Gr. avBponms man + adpa body -f- \6yot discourse]. The sum of knowledge regarding the human body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      anthroposomatology (an"thro-po-so-mat-ol'o-je) [Gr. di-flpuiros man + awpa. body + \6yot discourse). The sum of knowledge regarding the human body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      anthroposomatology (an-thro"po-so-ma-tol'o-jl) [G. anthropos, man, + soma, body, 4- -logia.] That part of anthropology which has to do with the human body, such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, etc.
  58. antiaggressin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiaggressin (an"te-ag-res'in). A substance formed in the body by repeated injection of an aggressin, and tending to oppose the action of the aggressin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiaggress'in. A specific antibody preventing the action of an aggressin.
  59. antidinic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antidinic (an-te-din'-ik) [anti-; Kra, a whirl]. Relieving or preventing vertigo.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antidinic (an-te-din'ik) [Gr. ai'ri against + jZcot whirl]. Curing or preventing vertigo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antidin'ic [G. unti, against, + dinos, dizziness.] i. Relieving vertigo. 2. An agent which prevents or relieves vertigo.
  60. antienzyme - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antienzyme (an-te-en'zim) [Gr. tvrl against + entyme]. i. An agent that neutralizes an enzyme: formed in the blood-serum of an animal on the injection of the enzyme. 2. An enzyme which neutralizes the action of another enzyme.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antienzyme (an"tl-en'zim). i. An antibody to an enzyme. 3. An inhibitory enzyme, one capable of retarding or checking the activity of another enzyme.
  61. antifebrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antifebrin (an-te-feb'-rin) [anti-; febris, a fever], CcHi.CfHiO.NH. The proprietary name of acetanilide or phenylacetamide. A white, crystalline powder, insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, ether, and chloroform. It is antipyretic and analgesic. The drug's official name is acetanilidum. Dose 5-10 gr. (0.3-0.6 Gm.),
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antifeb'rin. Trade name of acetanilid. a. sal'icylate, salifebrin.
  62. antihydropin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antihydropin (an-te-hi'-dro-pin) [anti-; Map, water]. A crystalline principle obtainable from the common cockroach, BlaUa (Periplantta) orientals, and said to be diuretic. Dose 10-20 Rt. (0.6-1.3 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antihydropin (an-te-hi'dro-pin). A crystalline diuretic substance obtained from cockroaches. Dose, 10-15 gr. (0.666-1 gm.).
  63. antiphone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiphone (an'-le-fSn) \anli-; .,'•.•• i, sound). An appliance worn in the auditory meatus, and intended to protect the wearer from noises.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiphone (an'te-fdn) [Gr. avrl before + cu*i voice]. An instrument to be worn in the auditory meatus to protect the ear from noises.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiphone (an'te-f6n) [Gr. irrl before + voice]. An instrument to be worn in the auditory meat us to protect the ear from noises.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      an'tiphone [G. anti, against, + phone, sound.] An appliance for occluding the external auditory meatus to dull the perception of disturbing noises.
  64. antiplastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antiplastic (an-le-plas'-tik) [anli-; . to form). I. Unfavorable to granulation or to the healing process. 2. An agent impoverishing the blood. 3. Preventing or checking plastic exudation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antiplastic (an-te-plas'tik) [Gr. AW against + lrXaaaeii' to form]. 1. Unfavorable to the healing process. 2. An agent that impoverishes the blood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antiplastic (an-te-plas'tik) i. Unfavorable to the healing process. 2. An agent that impoverishes the blood
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antiplas'tic. Preventing cicatrization.
  65. antirabic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'-bik) [anti-; rabies, madness]. Preventing or curing rabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'bik). Preventive of or curing rabies; antilyssic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antirabic (an-te-ra'bik). Preventive of or curing rabies; antilyssic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antirab'ic. Preventive or curative of rabies, antilyssic.
  66. antisudoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antisudoral (an-te-su'-dor-aT) [anti-; sudor, sweat]. Checking the secretion of sweat.
  67. antithermic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antithermic (an-te-ther'-mik) (anti-; dippy, heat]. Cooling; antipyretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      antithermic (an-te-ther'mik) [Gr. iarrl against + heat]. Antipyretic; antifebrile.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antithermic (an-tl-thur'mik) [G. -anti, against, + thermS, heat.] Antipyretic.
  68. antitrope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      antitrope (an'-te-trdp) [anti-; Tfii-tn-, to turn]. Organs arranged to form a symmetrical pair. Thus the right eye is an antitrope to the left. 2. An antibody.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antitrope (an'te-trop) [Gr. ami against + rpivav to turn]. 1. Any organ which forms a symmetric pair with another. 2. Same as antibody.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antitrope (an'tl-trop) [G. anti, against, + trope, a turn.] i. Antibody. 2. Antimere(a).
  69. antodontalgic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      antodontalgic (an"to-don-tal'jik). Relieving toothache.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      antodontal'gic. Antiodontalgic.
  70. aorticorenal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aorticorenal (a-or"tik-o-re'nal). Pertaining to t
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aorticorenal (a-pr"tik-o-re/nai). Pertaining to the aorta and the kidneys.
  71. apepsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apepsia (ah-pep'-se-ah) [d. priv.; flrr**, to digest]. Cessation or absence of the digestive function, a,, hysterical, apepsia due to hysteria. Syn., hysterical anorexia, a. nervosa, see anorexia nervosa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apep'sia [G. a- priv. -I- pepsis, a digesting.] Extreme dyspepsia; complete cessation of digestion.
  72. aphasiac - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aphasiac (ak-fa'-xe-ak) [see aphasia]. One who is aphasic.
  73. apophysary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apophysary (ap-off'-is-o-re) [twotfrtttir, to put forth]. Pertaining to or of the nature of an apophysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apophysary (a-pof i-sa-rl). Relating to an apophysis, apophyseal.
  74. apositic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apositic (ap-o-sit'-ik) [in-6, from; alrot, food]. Impairing the appetite; affected with apositia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apositic (ap-o-sit'ik). Causing a loathing of food; diminishing the appetite.
  75. apospory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apospory (ap-os'po-re) [Gr. Air6 away + spore]. Lack of power of forming spores.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apos'pory [G. apo, from, -I- sporos, seed ] In botany, absence of the power of producing spores.
  76. apostasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      apostasis (ap-os'-tas-is) [iurboraau, a standing away from], i. An abscess. 2. The end or the crisis of an attack of disease; termination by crisis. 3. An exfoliation.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      apos'tasis. 1. The termination of a disease by the formation of an abscess or by some critical discharge. 2. An abscess, especially a wandering abscess or one that is accompanied by the separation of a piece of bone. [Gr., apostasis, from apo, away from, + islanai, to stand.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      apostasis (ap-os'tas-is) [Gr.]. i. An abscess. 2. The end or crisis of an attack of disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      apos'tasis [G. a departure from, an abscess.] i. The termination of a disease, a. Exfoliation of bone. 3. Abscess.
  77. archegenesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archegenesis (ark-c-jcn'-es-is). The same as archebiosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archegenesis (ar-kc-jen'es-is) [Gr. ipxq beginning -f yevtcis reproduction]. Same as archebiosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archegenesis (ar-ke-gen'e-sis) [G. arche, beginning, -f- genesis, origin.] Spontaneous generation.
  78. archeocyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archeocyte (ar'-ke-o-sit). Same as archaeocyte.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archeocyte (ar'ke-o-slt) [Gr. dpxaios ancient + K6tos cell]. Any free or wandering ameboid cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archeocyte (ar'ke-o-slt). Archseocyte.
  79. archesporium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archesporium (ar-ke-spo'rl-um) [G. arche, beginning, + sforos, seed.] A layer of cells giving rise to the mother cells of spores or pollen.
  80. archiblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      archiblast (ar'-kf-l>ln.\t'\ [archi-; 0Xaarablast, or connective tissues.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      archiblast (ar'ke-blast) [Gr. dpxi; first + 0\aar6s germ]. I. The formative material or protoplasm of an egg. 2. His' term for the fundamental part of the blastodermic layers as distinguished from the parablast or peripheral portion of the mesoderm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      archiblast (ar'ke-blast) [Gr. ipxrj first + /SXoffrAs germ], i. The formative material or protoplasm of an egg. 2. His' term for the fundamental part of the blastodermic layers as distinguished from the parablast or peripheral portion of the mesoderm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      archiblast (ar'ld-blast) [G. archi-, primitive, + blastos, germ.] i. Epiblast* of His. a. The formative part of the yolk distinguished from that which affords nourishment to the embryo.
  81. argentose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      argentose (ar'jen-tos). An astringent and gem
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      argen'tose. A compound of nucleoprotein and silver, containing 30 per cent, of the latter; employed as an astringent and germicide in gonorrhea, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, etc.
  82. argyrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      argyrol (ar'-jir-ol). A soluble silver salt obtained by combining a proteid of wheat with 30 % of silver. It is used in gonorrhea. Syn., silver vitelline.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ar'gyrol. Silver vitellin, obtained from protein and silver oxid, containing 20 to 25 per cent, silver. It is used in the treatment of cystitis, conjunctivitis, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      argyrol (ar'jir-ol). A vitellin silver preparation in the form of brown scales, soluble in water: used in gonorrhea, conjunctivitis, laryngitis, etc., in a 0.5-2.5 per cent, solution.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ar'gyrol. A trade name for silver vitelline, a compound of silver and a protein obtained from serum-albumin; a dark-brown powder or scales, freely soluble in water, and containing about 25 per cent, of silver; employed in gonorrhea and in eye diseases in solution of 1-50 to 1-20.
  83. armoracia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      armoracia (ar-mo-ra'she-ah) [L.]. Horse-radish. See Cochlearia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      armora'cia. Horseradish, armora'cia: ra'diz (Br.), horseradish, the fresh root of Roripa armoraeia, Cochlearia armoraeia, an herb of eastern Europe now naturalized everywhere; employed as a condiment, for the relief of flatulence, and in the prevention and treatment of scurvy.
  84. arrachement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arrachement (ar-ash-mon(g)') [it., a tearing out]. Tearing out; extraction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arrachement (a-rash-mon') [Fr. tearing out.] Pulling out the capsule, in membranous cataract, by means of a capsule-forceps inserted through a corneal incision.
  85. arsenicophagy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arsenicophagy (ar-sen-ik-off'-a-je) [arsenum. arsenic; ^o7«[>-. to eat]. The habitual eating of arsenic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arsenicophagy (ar"sen-ik-oFaj-e) [arsenic + Gr ipayeiv to eat). The habit of eating arsenic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arsenicoph'agy [G. arsenikon, arsenic, + phago, I eat.] The habitual taking of arsenic (arseni trioxidum), arsenic-eating.
  86. arsenium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arsenium (ar-se'ne-um) [LJ. The element arsenii
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arse'nium. Arsenic, arsenum.* arse'nii io'didum (Br.), arseni iodidum (U.S.).
  87. arteriography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arteriography (ar-tf-rr-og'-ra-j:-) \arteria; -,-pij.^, a writingj. z. A description of thj aneriea. 2. The graphic representation of the pulse-waves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriography (ar"te-re-og'ra-fe) [Gr. iprripla artery + ypiim writing]. 1. A description of the arteries. 2. The graphic recording of the arterial pulse.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      arteriography. The process of producing graphic representations of the state of the pulse. 11..'it., arteriographia, from Gr., arteria, an artery, + graphein, to write.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arteriog'raphy [G. grapho, I write, I register.] i. Sphygmography. 2. Description of the arteries.
  88. arteriospasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arteriospasm (ar-te're-o-spazm). Spasm of an artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arteriospasm (ar-te're-o-spazm). Spasm of an artery
  89. arthrectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'-to-mt) [arthron; Aktom^, a cutting-out]. Excision of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'to-me) [Gr. ap6por joint H bcrour) excision]. The excision of a joint.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      arthrec'tomy. The operation of opening a joint and removing diseased structures by a process of scraping, gouging, or cutting; also excision of a joint. [Gr., arthron, joint, + ektome, excision.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthrectomy (ar-threk'to-me) [Gr. apOpov joint + «\ n.fi>) excision). The excision of a joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arthrec'tomy [G. arthron, joint, + ekloml, excision.] Exsection of a joint.
  90. arthritism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthritism (ar'thrit-izm) [arthritis]. The go diathesis; the peculiar diathesis or disposition body that predisposes to joint disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthritism (ar'thrit-izm) [arthritis]. The gouty diathesis; the peculiar diathesis or disposition of body that predisposes to joint disease.
  91. arthrosia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'-ze-ah) ^arthron]. Painful inflammatory or other affection of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'se-ah) [Gr. ap$pov joint], i. A proprietary medicine: said to be antilithic, tonic, and alterative. 2. Painful inflammation of a joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      arthrosia (ar-thro'se-ah) [Gr. ipSpov joint], i. A proprietary medicine: said to be antilithic, tonic, and alterative. 2. Painful inflammation of a joint.
  92. articulatio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      articulatio (ar-tik-u-la'-she-o) [I,., a joint]. A joint; see articulation, a. acromioclavicularis, acromioclavicular joint, a. atlantoepistrophica, joint between atlas and epistropheus or axis. a. atlantooccipitalis, joint between atlas and occipital bone. a. carpometacarpea pollicis, carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, a. calcaneocuboidea, calcaneocuboid joint, a. cochleoris, spiral joint, a. composite, compound joint, a. coxa;, hip-joint, a. cricoarytasnoidea, arycorniculate synchondrosis. a. cricothyreoidea, cricothyreoid articulation. a. cubiti, elbow-joint. a. cuneonavicularis, cuneonavicular joint, a. ellipsoidea, elliptical joint, a. genu, knee joint, a. humeri, shoulder-joint, a. humeroradialis, humeroradial articulation, a. humeroulnaris, humero-ulnar articulation, a. mcudomalleolaris, joint between anvil and hammer, a. incudostapedia, joint between anvil and Btirrup. a. intercarpea, intercarpal articulation, carpal joints, a. mandibularis, jaw-joint, a. manus, joint of the hand. a. ossis pisoformis, joint of the pisiform bone. a. radioulnaris distalis, inferior radio-ulnar joint, a. radioulnaris proximalis, superior radio-ulnar joint. a. sacrpiliaca, sacro-iliac joint, a. sellaris. saddle joint, a. simplex, simple joint, a. sphceroidea, spherical joint, a. stern oclavicularis, sternoclavicular joint, a. talocalcanea, talocalcanean joint. a. talocalcaneonavicularis, talocalcaneonavicular joint. a. talocruralis, ankle-joint. a. talonavicularis, talonavicular joint. a. tarsi transversa (Chopartii, Chopart's transverse articulation of the tarsuj. a. tibiofibularis, superior tibiofibular articulation, a. trochoidea, trochoid or pivot joint.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      articulatio (ar-tik-u-la'she-o). Latin for articulation, a. tar si transversa, Chopart's joint.
  93. arytenoidectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arytenoidectomy (ar-c-ten-yid-tk'-to-me) [arytrnoid; tmn+. a cutting-out]. Removal of an arvtenoid cartilage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arytenoidectomy (ar"it-e-noi-dek'to-me) [arytenoid + Gr. turofii) excision]. Surgical removal of an arytenoid cartilage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      arytenoidec'tomy [G. ektome, excision.] Excision of an arytenoid cartilage.
  94. arytenoiditis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      arytenoiditis (ar-e-ltn-air-}- Inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage or muscles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      arytenoiditis (ar-it"en-oi-di'tis). Inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage or muscles
  95. aselline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aselline (as-el'-fn). A poisonous leukomaine found in cod-liver oil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aselline (a-sel'en). A poisonous leucomaine found in cod-liver oil.
  96. asymbolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'-le-ah) [4. priv.; rti/i^oXor, symbol). The loss of all power of communication, even by signs or symbols.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'le-ah). A term proposed by Finkelburg for the phenomena of aphasia (q. v.). [Gr., a, priv., -r symbolon, a sign.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asymbolia (ah-sim-bo'le-ah) [Gr. a priv. + 0-6^fto\ov symbol]. The loss of all power of comprehending symbolic things, such as words, figures, gestures, etc. (Wernicke).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      asymbo'lia [G. a- priv. + symbolon, an outward sign.] i. Loss of the power of appreciation by touch of the form and nature of an object. 2. A form of aphasia in which the significance of signs is not appreciated.
  97. asystematic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      asystematic (ah-sis-lem-at'-ik) [4, priv.; Wot^h*, system]. Diffuse; not restricted to any one or several systems of nerve fibers; applied to nervous diseases that are general.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      asystematic (ah"sis-tem-at'ik). Not confined to any one system of nerve-fibers; diffuse.
  98. ataxiophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ataxiophobia (ah-tax"e-o-fo'be-ah). Ataxophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ataxiopho'bia [G. phobos, fear.] Morbid dread of suffering from tabes dorsalis.
  99. ataxophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ataxophobia (at-oks-o-fo'-be-ah) [ira^la, want of order; «£A(3oj. fear]. I. Excessive dread of disorder. 9. Morbid dread of suffering from loco motor ataxia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ataxophobia (ah-taks-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. ira(la disorder + ipdffos fear]. Morbid or insane dread of disorder.
  100. atheromatosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atheromatosis. A more or less generalized atheromatous condition of the arteries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atheromatosis (ath"er-o-mat-o'sis). An atheromatous condition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atheromatosis (ath"er-o-mat-o'sis). An atheromatous condition.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ath"eromato'sis. A more or less generalized atheromatous disease of the arteries.
  101. atonicity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atonicity (at-on-is'-il-e}. Lack of tone, atony.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atonicity (at-on-is'it-e). Atonic quality.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atonicity (at-o-nisl-tl). Atony, lack of tone. at'onied. Atonic, marked by lack of tone. ai'ony [G. atonia, languor.] Relaxation, flaccidity;
  102. atoxic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atoxic (ah-toks'-ik) [4, priv.; r^uror, poison]. Not venomous; not poisonous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atoxic (ah-tok'sik) [Gr. a neg. + To£«6»' poison). Not poisonous; not due to a poison.
  103. atrichosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'-sis) lse« atrichia}. A condition characterized by absence of hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'sis). Same as atrichia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atrichosis (ah-trik-o'sis). Same as alrichia.
  104. atrophia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      atrophia (at-ro'-fe-ah). See atrophy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      atrophia (at-ro-pi'na). Same as atropin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      atrophia (ah-tro'fe-ah) [L., from Gr. a neg. -f Tpoifr/i nourishment]. Latin for atrophy, a. cu'tis. See alrophoderma. a. in fan turn, tabes mesenterica. a. inaculo sa cu'tiB (Jadassohn). See anelodermia. a. nwsentor'ica, tabes mesenterica. a. mnsculo rum lipomato sa, pscudohypertrophic muscular paralysis. See under paralysis, a. pile'rum pro'pria, atrophy of the hair. a. testic'uli, wasting of the testicle, a. un'guium, atrophy of the nails.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      atro'phia [G. a- priv. + trophS, nourishment.] Atrophy, a. infan'tum, tabes mesenterica. a. musculo'rum lipomato'sa, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, a. pilo'rum pro'pria, trichorrhexis nodosa.
  105. attrahens - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      attrahens (at'-ra-hent) [L., "drawing"]. Drawing forward, as attrahens aurem, a muscle drawing the ear forward and upward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      attrahens (at'rah-henz) [L. for "drawing toward"], a. au'rem. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      att'rahens [L. attrahert, to attract.] Drawing toward, noting a muscle (attrahetts aurftn or auriculam) rudimentary in man, which tends to draw the pinna of the ear forward; musculus auricularis anterior [BNA].
  106. augmentor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      augmentor (aing-men'-tor). An agent which Increases or accelerates the action of auxetlcs; by itself it Is unable to produce cell division. See auxetic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor). 1. Increasing: applied to nerves or nerve-cells concerned in increasing the size and force of heart contractions. 2. A substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor). i. Increasing: applied to nerves or nerve-cells concerned in increasing the size and force of heart contractions. 2. A substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      augmentor (awg-men'tor) [L. augmentum, increase.] A hypothetical substance supposed to increase the action of an auxetic or a kinetic, a. nerves, accelerator nerves, called augmentor because their action is to increase the force as well as the rapidity of the heart beat.
  107. aurantia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurantia (aw-ron'-she-ah) [aurantium]. i. An orange coal-tar dye; an ammonium salt of hexanitrodiphenylamine. 2. An orange or oranges.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurantia (aw-ran'she-ah). An orange coal-tar stain.
  108. aurantium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurantium (aw-ran'-she-urn) [L.; gen., aurantii], Orange. The fruit of Citrus vulgarii and C. aurantinm. Both the flowers and the rind of the fruit are employed in medicine, aurantii amari cortex (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel, aurantii amari, fluidertracrum (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel, alcohol, and water. It is used as a flavor. Dose J-i dr. (2-4 Cc.). aurantii amari, tinctura (U. S. P.), bitter orange-peel. 20; dilute alcohol, q. s. ad 100. Dose i-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.)- aurantii corticis, oleum (U. S. P.), the volatile oil expressed from the rind of the orange; it is aromatic and a mild tonic, but U used mainly as a flavor. Dose 1-5 drops, aurantii dulcis cortex (U. S. P.), sweet orange-peel, aurantii dulcis, tinctura (U. S. P.). sweet orange-peel, 20; dilute alcohol, q. s. ad 100. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, elixir, oil of orange-peel, i; sugar, 100; alcohol and water, q. s. ad 300. aurantii florum, aqua (U. S. P.), §trorn;er orange-flower water and distilled water, of each, i volume, aurantii florum fortior, aqua (U. S. P.). water saturated with the volatile oil of fresh orange-flowers, aurantii florum, oleum, oil of neroli. a volatile oil distilled from fresh orangeflowers. Doee 1-5 drops, aurantii florum, syrupus (U. S. P.), sugar, 85; orange-flower water, sufficient to make zoo parts. A common flavoring agent, aurentit. infusum (B. P ). Dose x-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). auxantii, infusum, comppsitum (B. P.). Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.}. surantii, spiritus, oil of orange-peel. 5; deodorized alcohol, 95. Dose according to quantity of alcohol desired, aurantii, spiritus, compositus (U- S. P.), oil of orange-peel, 20; oil of lemon, 5; ofl of coriander, 2; oil of anise, 5; deodorized alcohol, su Sicient to make ioo parts, aurantii, syrupus (U. S. P.), tincture of sweet orange-peel, s; citric acid. 0.5; magnesium carbonate, i; sugar. 82; water sufficient to make 100 parts, aurantii, tinctura (B. P.). Doae 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, tinctura, rMentis (B. P.), tincture of fresh orange-peel. Dose 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.). aurantii, vinum (B. P.). contains 12 % of alcohol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurantium (aw-ran'she-um) [L. for "orange"; gen. ,(.•(.-,•,.'/;,] See orange, a. ama'ruiu cortex, the peel or rind of the bitter (unripe) orange. a. dul'ce cor'tex, the rind of the sweet (ripe) orange.
  109. auricularis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      auricularis (aw-rik-u-la'-ris) [see auricle], i. Auricular. 2. The extensor minimi digiti. See under muscle, a. magnus, a branch of the cervical plexus of nerves.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      auricularis (aw-rik-u-lah'ris) [L. auricular.] i. The little finger, so called because used to clean the auditory meatus. 2. Nervus* auricularis magnus.
  110. aurinasal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      aurinasal (aw-re-na'-sal) [auris; warns, nose]. Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      aurinasal (aw-rin-a'sal). Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      aurinasal (aw-rin-a'sal). Pertaining to the ear and the nose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      aurinasal (aw-ri-na'zal) [L. auris, ear, + nasus, nose.] Relating to the ear and the nose.
  111. auto-analysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      auto-analysis (aw-to-an-al'is-is). The analysi
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      auto-analysis (aw-to-an-al'is-is). The analysis and interpretation, on the part of a nervous patient, of the state of mind underlying his disorder: employed as a means of treatment.
  112. autoimmunization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      autoimmunization (av.'-to-im-u-ni-sa'-shurt) [auto-; immunization]. Immunization obtained by natural processes at work within the body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      autoimmunization (aw*to-im-u-ni-za'shun). The natural process of immunization against a disease effected by an attack of the same.
  113. automatograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      automatograph (aw-to-mat'-o-graf) [alirouciTtftir, to act spontaneously; ->p, to record]. An instrument for registering involuntary Movements.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      automatograph (aw-to-mat'o-graf) [Gr. a£rro,uarta/j6t automatism 4~ yp&tfxiv to write). An instrument for recording involuntary movements.
  114. automysophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      automysophobia (aw-to-mis-o-fo'-bc-ah) [auto; riaai. filth; &&h, fear]. Insane dread of personal uncleanliness.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      automysophobia (aw"to-mis-o- fo'be-ab'. A form of phobia characterized by a dread of personal uncleanliness. [Gr, autos, self, + mysos, dirt, + photws. fear.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      automysophobia (aw"to-mis-o-fo'be-ab) [Gr. airrbs self + myiophobia]. Insane dread of personal uncleanness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      automysophobia (aw-to-mi-so-fo'bl-ah) [G. autos, self, + mysos, dirt, + phobos, fear.] An insane imagining that one is filthy or smells bad.
  115. avivement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      avivement (ah-viv-maw'). The operative refreshing of the edges of a wound.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      avivement (ah-vev-maw'). The operative refreshing of the edges of a wound.
  116. axungia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      axungia (ax-un'je-ah). Lit., axle grease; as now used, any animal fat, particularly lard. a. anscrina, a. anseris. Goosegrease, official in several old formularies and still used as a remedy, especially in skin diseases, a. balsamica, a. benzofltn, a. benzolnata. Benzoinated lard. a. mineralis. Petrolatum, a. pod urn tauri. Neat's foot oil. a. porci. Hog's lard. a. scrofae, a. suilla. Hog's lard. [Lat., axis, an axle, + ungere, to smear.]