User:Visviva/Medical/By links/C

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  1. cacoplastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cacoplastic (kak-o-plas'tik) [Gr. xaxot bad lrXaoriKos forming]. Susceptible of only an irr perfect organization.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cacoplas'tic [G. kakos, bad, + plastikos, fit for moulding, formed.] i. Relating to or causing morbid growth, noting the cacoplastic albumin of Rokitansky the presence of which was assumed to be essential to the production of cancer, a. Incapable of normal or perfect formation.
  2. cacotrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cacotrophy (kak-of-ro-fe) [coco-; rpo^, nourishment). Disordered or defective nutrition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cacotrophy (kak-ot'ro-fe) [Gr. rpo^ nourishment]. Malnutrition; impaired or disor dered nourishment.
  3. calage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calage (kah-lahzh') [Fr.]. Propping with pillows to immobilize the viscera and thus relieve seasickness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calage (kal-azh') [Fr. wedging.] Wedging the body in the berth by means of pillows, in order to prevent rolling in case of seasickness.
  4. calcarine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calcarine (kal'-kar-fn) [calcar]. Spur-shaped; relating to the hippocampus minor, c. fissure. See fcfivre. calcarine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calcarine (kal'kar-in) [L. calcari'nus spur-shaped]. Spur shaped.
  5. calcicosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calcicosis (kul-sik-o'-sis) [caLt]. Marble-cutter's phthisis; a chronic inflammation of the lung due to the inhalation of marble-dust.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calcicosis (kal-sik-o'sis) [L. calx lime]. Marblecutters' phthisis; pneumonia due to the inhalation of marble-dust.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calcicosis (kal-sl-ko'sis). Pneumonoconiosis from the inhalation of limestone dust; marble-cutter's phthisis.
  6. calculary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calculary (kal'-ku-la-re) [calculus, a stone]. Relating to or of the nature of a calculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calculary (kal'ku-la-re). Pertaining to calculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      calculary (kal'ku-la-re). Pertaining to calculus.
  7. calendulin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calendulin (kal-en'-du-lin) [calendula]. An amorphous principle obtainable from calendula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calendulin (kal-en'du-lin). A mucilaginous principle from Calen'dula officinalis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      calendulin (kal-en'du-lin). A mucilaginous principle from Calen'dula offifina'lis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calen'dulin. A yellow amorphous neutral principle in calendula.
  8. caligation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caliga'tion. Caligo.
  9. calisaya - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calisaya (fcjJ-ij-o'-yn*) [S. A.]. Cinchona bark, especially that of cinchona calisaya. See cinchona.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calisaya (kal-is-a'yah). The bark of Cincho'na calisa'ya; yellow Peruvian bark.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      calisaya (kal-is-a'yah). The bark of Cincho'na «ili-,i'\,i; yellow Peruvian bark.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calisa'ya. Yellow cinchona, the bark of Cinchona flava.
  10. callositas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      callositas (kol-o^-it-as). See callosity.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      callos'itas. i. The state of being indurated.
  11. calmin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calmin (kal'-min). A compound of antlpyrine and heroine; it is used in asthma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calmin (kahm'in). The proprietary name for the sodium salt of veronal: used as a hypnotic.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cal'min. A proprietary mixture of heroin and antipyrin; used in whooping cough.
  12. calorifacient - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calorifacient (kal"o-rif-a'shent) [L. ca'lor heat + ja'cerc to make]. Producing heat: used of certain foods.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      calorifacient (kal"o-rif-a'shent) [L. ca'lor heat + fa'cere to make]. Producing heat: used of certain foods.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calorifacient (kal-or-I-fa'shent) [L. color, heat, + facere, to make.] Producing heat.
  13. calumba - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calumba (kal-um'-bah) [native Mozambique, kalumb]. Columbo. The root of Jateorrhiza calumba, native to South Africa and parts of the East Indies. It is an excellent example of a simple bitter, and contains a bitter principle, calumbin, CaHnCh, of which the dose is 1-3 gr. (0.065-0.3 Gm.). It is not astringent, and may be prescribed with salts of iron. It is useful in atonic dyspepsia, and as a mild, appetizing tonic in convalescence, c., extract of (extraclum calumba, B. P.). Dose 3-IO gr. (0.13-0.65 Gm.). c., fiuidextract of (fluidextradum calumba, U. S. P.). Dose 5-30 min. (0.32-2.0 Cc.). c., infusion of (infusum colomba, B. P.). Dose 1-2 oz, (30-60 Cc.). c., tincture of (tinclura calumba, U. S. P.), contains 10 % of calumba. Dose 4-» dr. (2-8 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calumba (kal-um'bah) [L.]. A menispermaceous plant, Jaieorrhi'ta calum'ba, of East Africa; also
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      calumba (kal-um'bah) [L.]. A menispermaceous plant, Jaleorrhi'za calum'ba, of East Africa: also its root. It is a bitter, stomachic tonic, used in dyspepsia, diarrhea, dysentery, and in the vomiting of pregnancy and of teething. Dose, 10-30 gr. (0.6-2 gm.); of the extract, 2-10 gr. (0.13-0.65 gm.); of the fluidextract, 1-8 dr. (4-32 c.c.); of the tincture, 1-2 dr. (4-8 c.c.); of the infusion, 1-2 fl.oz. (30-60 c.c.). American c. SeeF>o«ra.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calum'ba (U.S.). Columbo, the dried root of Jattorrhiia falmata, a tall climbing vine of East Africa; used as a bitter tonic in doses of gr. 15—60 (i. 0—4. o) in decoction.
  14. cambogia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cambogia (kam-bo'je-ah) [LJ. Gamboge; a yd low gum-resin from Garcin'ia hanbu'rii and otlie: guttiferous East Indian trees. It is a drastii hydragogue cathartic. Dose, 1-5 gr. (0.06-0.. gm.).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cambogia (kam-bo'je-ah). Of the U. S. Ph. and Br. Ph., gamboge.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cambo'gia (U.S. and Br.). Gamboge, a gum resin obtained from Garcinia hanburii; purgative and anthelmintic in doses of gr. ^-5 (0.015-0.3). c. in'dica (B.A.), Indian gamboge, the gum resin from Garcinia morella; cathartic in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
  15. camp-fever - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      camp-fever. A popular name for typhus fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      camp-fe'ver. Typhus* fever.
  16. camphol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      camphol (kam'-fol). See borneol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cam'phol. Salol-camphor.
  17. canalicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      canalicular (kan-al-ik'-fl-lar) [canal]. Canalshaped ; relating to a canaliculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canalicular (kan-al-ik'u-lar). Resembling or
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canalicular (kan-al-ik'u-lar). Resembling or pertaining to a canaliculus.
  18. cancellated - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cancellated (kan'sel-a-ted). Having a lattice-like structure.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cancellated (kan'sel-a-ted). Having a lattice-like structure.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cancellated [L. cancellare, to rmike a lattice-work.] Having a lattice-work structure, reticular.
  19. canceration - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      canceration (kan-ser-a'-shun). Development into a cancer; the assumption of malignant qualities by a tumor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canceration (kan-ser-a'shun). The assumptk of malignant qualities.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canceration (kan-ser-a'shun). The assumption of malignant qualities.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cancera'tion. A change to malignancy, said of a previously benign tumor.
  20. cancerism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cancerism (kan'-scr-izm). The tendency to cancerous formation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cancerism (kan'ser-izm). The cancerous diathesi a tendency to the development of malignant diseas
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cancerism (kan'ser-izm). The cancerous diathesis; a tendency to the development of malignant disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      can'cerism. A hypothetical tendency to the development of malignant disease.
  21. canchalagua - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canchalagua (kan-shah-lah'gwah). The Eryl rafa chilen'sis, a South American tonic her used like gentian.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canchalagua (kan-shah-lah'gwah). The Erythrif',i chilen'sis, a South American tonic herb: used like gentian.
  22. cancrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cancrum (kang'-krum) [cancer], A cancer or rapidly spreading ulcer, c. nasi, gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. oris, a disease of childhood between the ages of one and five, characterized by the formation of foul, deep ulcers of the bucca Isurfaces of the cheeks or lips. There is but slight pain, but the prostration is great, and death usually results from exhaustion or blood-poisoning. The disease is bacterial, poor hygienic surroundings and a debilitated system being predisposing causes. Syn., rn*ber of the mouth; gangrenous stomatitis; noma;
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cancrum (kan'krum) [L.J. Canker, c. nas gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. o'ris, non of the mouth, or gangrenous stomatitis, a disea of childhood marked by the development foul ulcers in the mucous membrane of the chee and lips. The disease is attended with pre exhaustion, and death frequently ensues, puden'di, ulceration of the pudenda.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cancrum (kan'krum) [L.]. Canker. C. na'si, gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. O'ris, noma of the mouth, or gangrenous stomatitis, a disease of childhood marked by the development of foul ulcers in the mucous membrane of the cheeks and lips. The disease is attended with great exhaustion, and death frequently ensues. C. puden'di, ulceration of the pudenda.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      can'crum [L. cancer.] A gangrenous ulceration. c. na'si, gangrenous inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane, c. o'ris, noma,* gangrenous stomatitis.
  23. candol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      candol (kan'dol). A dry malt extract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      candol (kan'dol). A dry malt extract.
  24. cane-sugar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cane-sugar. See saccharose (i).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cane-sugar (kan-shug'ar). Saccharose or tyi
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cane-sugar (kan-shug'ar). Saccharose or typic sugar derived from the sugar-cane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cane-sugar. Saccharose.
  25. canities - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      canities (kan-ish'-e-lt) [L.]. Pollosis; hoariness; blanching of the hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canities (kan-ish'e-*z) [L.]. Grayness or whiteness of the hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canities (kan-ish'e-iz) [L.]. Grayness or whiteness of the hair.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      canities (kan-ish'e-5z) [L. canus, hoary, gray.] Grayness of the hair.
  26. cannabin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cannabin (kan'-ab-in). A crystalline resin from Indian hemp; it is hypnotic. Dose lJ-4 gr. (0.007— 0.26 Gm.). c. tannate, a yellow, astringent powder, soluble in alkaline water or alcohol; it is hypnotic and sedative. Dose 2-10 gr. (0.13-0.6 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cannabin (kan'ab-in). (i) A resin; also (2) a hypnotic alkaloid and (3) a glucosid from cannabis. Dose of the alkaloid, 1-4 gr. (0.064-0.26 gm.). c. tannate, a hypnotic compound made by precipitating the glucosid cannabin with tannic acid. Dose, 2-25 gr. (0.13-1.6 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cannabin (kan'3-bin). A resinoid of greenish-black color, obtained from cannabis indica; used in hysteria, neuralgia, delirium tremens, and insomnia in doses of gr. J—t (0.015-0.06).
  27. cantharidin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cantharidin (kan-thar'-id-in) [cantharides], CioHirOi. The bitter principle contained in Spanish flies and ether insect?; it crystallizes in prisms orleaflets, and melts at 2 18°. It has an extremely bitter taste, and produces blisters on the skin. See cantharis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cantharidin (kan-thar'id-ini. The most important active principle, CMH:,0.. of cantharides. It occurs in crystalline form, has a bitter taste, and produces blistering of the skin.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      canthar'idin. The active principle of cantharides. It occurs in crystalline form, is of bitter taste and produces blisters of the skin. It is the anhydrid of cantharidic acid. The formula is GoHi2Oi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cantharidin (kan-thar'id-in). The most important active principle. CMH2,OS, of cantharides. It occurs in crystalline form, has a bitter taste, and produces blistering of the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      canthar'idin. The active principle of cantharis, the anhydride of cantharidic acid, C1(H,,O.
  28. canthitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canthitis (kan-thi'tis). Inflammation of a canthus or of the canthi.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      canthitis (kan-thi'(the')tis) [G. kanthos, canthus, + -t'.'ts.] Inflammation of a canthus.
  29. canula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      canula (kan'-u-lah). Sec cannula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canula (kan'u-lah). See cannula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canula (kan'u-lah). See cannula.
  30. capeline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capeline (kap'e-lin) [Fr.]. A cap-shaped bandage for the head or for the stump of an amputated limb.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capeline (kap'e-lin). A bandage covering the head or an amputation stump.
  31. capiat - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capiat (ka'-pc-al) [L., "let it take"]. An instrument intended for use in removing remnants of the placenta, polypi, or the like, from the uterine cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capiat (ka'pe-at) [L. "let it take"]. An instrument for removing foreign bodies from a cavity, as of the uterus.
  32. capillaritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capillaritis (kap-U-ar-i'-lis). Inflammation of the capillaries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capillaritis (kap-il-ar-i'tis). Inflammation of the capillaries.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capillaritis (kap-il-ar-i'(e')tis). Telangiitis.
  33. capilliculture - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capilliculture (kap-il'e-kul-tur) [L. capil'lus hair + i ill:H'i,i culture]. Treatment for the cure of baldness or the preservation of the hair.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capill'iculture [L. capittus, hair, + cnltura, culture.] The care of the hair; treatment of baldness or other diseases of the hair.
  34. capillitium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capillitium (kap-il-ish'e-um) [L. "head of hair"]. The interlacing, filamentous structure which, with the spores, fills the spore-case of myxomycetes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capillitium (ka-pl-lishl-um) [L. the hair.] A network of protoplasmic threads in the spore capsule of Myxomycetes, the function of which is to break up the spore masses.
  35. capitellum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capitellum (kap-il-el'-um) [dim. of caput}. I. A small head or rounded process of bone. 2. The rounded, external surface of the lower end of the humerus. 3. The bulb of a hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capitellum (kap-it-erum) [L. dim. of ca'pul head]. An eminence on the distal end of the humerus, articulating with the radius.
  36. caprin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caprin (hap'-H*]) [set capric]. An oily and flavoring constituent of butter; glycerol caprate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caprin (kap'rin). Any one of the caprates of glyceryl, espcciaUy the glyceryl tricaprate, or tricaprin, (CioH.jOj);,, from ordinary butter.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cap'rin. A caprate of glyceryl, found in butter, and one of the substances upon which the flavor of that substance depends.
  37. caprizant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caprizant (kap'-ri-ianl) [see capric]. Leaping; of '•*egular motion, applied to the pulse.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cap'rizant. Bounding, leaping, noting a form of pulse-beat.
  38. capsella - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capsella (kap-sel'-ah) [dim. of capsa, a box). The leaves and stems of C. bursa posloris, common in temperate climates. C. bursa pastoris, shepherd'* purse; theleaves are hemostatic and antiscorbutic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capsell'a [L. dim. of capsa, a box.] Shepherd's purse, herba capsellse; the dried herb Bursa
  39. capsicin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capsicin (kap'-sis-in). i. CiHuOi. The active principle of Cayenne pepper, found in the pericarp and placenta of Capsicum fastigiatum. and soluble in alcohol, ether, benzene, and fixed oils. It is a thick, yellowish-red substance, and its vapors arcintensely acrid. Dose Vn-t ft- (0.006-0.016 Cm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capsicin (kap'sis-in). i. An acrid resin found in capsicum berries. Dose, j-J gr. (0.008-0.016 gm.). i. The camphor of capsicum. 3. A volatile alkaloid of capsicum.
  40. car-sickness - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      car-sickness. The symptoms similar to those of sea-sickness produced by riding in railway cars.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      car-sickness (kar-sik'nes). An attack, not unlike sea-sickness, induced by railway travel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      car-sickness (kar-sik'nes). An attack, not unlike sea-sickness, induced by railway travel.
  41. carbolize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carbolize (kar'-bol-lz) [sec carbolic]. To impregnate with carbolic acid. To render aseptic or antiseptic by the use of carbolic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carbolize (kar'bol-Iz). To treat with carbolic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carbolize (kar'bol-Iz). To treat with carbolic acid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'bolize. To mix with or add carbolic acid, or phenol.
  42. carcinolytic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carcinolytic . (kar-nn-o-lif-ik) [carcinoma; \ivit, solution]. Said of a substance which is destructive to cancer cells.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carcinolytic (kar"sin-o-lit'ik) [carcinoma + Gr. Xvtcicos destroying]. Destroying cancer cells.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carcinolytic (kar"sin-o-lit'ik) [carcinoma + Gr. ^vrufAt destroying]. Destroying cancer cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      carcinolytic (kar"sin-o-lit'ik) [carcinoma + G. lytikos, causing a solution.] Destructive to the cells of carcinoma.
  43. carcinomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carcinomatous (kar-sin-o'-mat-us) [carcinoma}. Relating to or affected with carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carcinomatous (kar-sin-om'at-us). Pertaining to or of the nature of cancer; malignant.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carcinomatous (kar-sin-om'at-us). Pertaining to or of the nature of cancer; malignant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      carcino'matous. Relating to carcinoma.
  44. carcinosarcoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carcinosarcoma (kar"sin-o-sar-ko'mah). A condition of combined carcinoma and sarcoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carcinosarcoma (kar"sin-o-sar-ko'mah). A condition of combined carcinoma and sarcoma.
  45. carcinosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carcinosis (kar-sin-o'sis). i. A cancerous diathesis; tendency to the development of cancer. 2. A cancer or malignant tumor, miliary c., a form of carcinosis marked by the development of numerous nodules resembling miliary tubercles. C. plu rse, secondary cancer of the pleura in which the membrane is studded with nodules.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      carcino'sis. i. A generalization of cancerous growths; the occurrence of multiple carcinomata. carcinomatosis. a. A tendency to carcinoma, shown by the appearance of a new cancerous growth, not a local recurrence, after operative removal of a previous cancer.
  46. cardialgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardialgia (kar-de-al'-je-ah) [cardia; AX-yct, pain]. Pain in the region of the heart, usually due to gaseous distention of the stomach; heartburn. Syn., mortal cardiacus; morsus stomachi; morsus ventriculi. c. icterica, heartburn with jaundice, c. inflammatoria, gastritis, c. sputatoria, pyrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardialgia (kar-de-al'je-ah) [Gr. Kapoia heart + &\ym pain]. An uneasy or painful sensation in the stomach; heartburn.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cardialgia (kar-dl-al'jl-ah) [G. kardia, heart, + algos, pain.] Heartburn, an uncomfortable burning sensation in the stomach.
  47. cardin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardin (kar'din). An animal extract from ox's heart, prescribed in heart diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardin (kaKdin). An animal extract from ox's heart, prescribed in heart diseases.
  48. cardiocentesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiocentesis (kar-de-o-sen-Uf-sis) {cardio-; xtvn)va, puncture]. Puncture of one of the chambers of the heart to/elieve engorgement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiocentesis (kar"de-o-sen-te'sis) [Gr. KapSla heart + Kivrmrn puncture). Surgical puncture of the heart, designed to relieve its enlargement or for the injection of a medicine.
  49. cardiograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiograph (kar'-dc-o-graf) [cardio^; ypa^n;', to write]. An instrument for registering graphically the modifications of the pulsations of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiograph (kaKde-o-graf) [Gr. KapSla heart + ypafiiv to write). An instrument placed over the heart to indicate the force and form of the heart's movements.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      car'diograph. An instrument for registering the form of the heart beat by direct registration of the contraction of the musculature, or by measuring the change in volume of the organ or by measuring the change in pressure in the ventricles during the beat. [Gr., kardia, heart, + graphein, to write.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardiograph (karMe-o-graO [Gr. KapSla heart ! ypaifuv to write). An instrument placed over the heart to indicate the force and form of the heart's movements.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cardiograph [G. kardia, heart, + graphs, I write.] An instrument for recording graphically the movements of the heart, constructed on the principle of the sphygmograph.
  50. cardiographic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiographic (kar-de-o-graf'-ik) [cardio-; •,!•to write]. Pertaining to or recorded by the cardiograph. (
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardiographic (kar-de-o-graf'ik). Of, or relating to, cardiography.
  51. cardioinhibitory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardioinhibitory (kar-de-o-in-hib1'-it-o-re) [cardio-; inhibfre, to restrain]. Inhibiting or diminishing the heart's action. The cardioinhibitory fibers pass to the heart through the pneumogastric nerves.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cardioinhibitory (kar"dl-o-in-hib1-to-ri). Arresting or slowing the action of the heart.
  52. cardiokinetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiokinetic (kar-de-o-kin-ef-ik) [cardio-; KocZc, to move], i. Exciting the heart-action. 2. An agent which excites the action of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiokinetic (kar"de-o-kin-et'ik). 1. Exciting the heart. 2. A remedy that excites the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardiokinetic (kar"de-o-kin-et'ik). i. Exciting the heart. 2. A remedy that excites the heart.
  53. cardioneurosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardioneurosis (kar"de-o-nu-ro'sis) [Gr. KapSia heart + neurosis]. A functional nervous disorder marked by attacks of deranged cardiac action, such as palpitation and irregularity, a feeling of suffocation, hot flushes, and a sensation of impending trouble; called also pseudo-angina pectoris and cardiac neurasthenia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardioneurosis (kar"de-o-nu-ro'sis) [Gr. KapSla. heart + nturosis]. A functional nervous disorder marked by attacks of deranged cardiac action, such as palpitation and irregularity, a feeling of suffocation, hot flushes, and a sensation of impending trouble; called also pseudo-angina pfClaris and cardiac neurasthenia.
  54. cardiophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiophobia (kar"de-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. KapSia heart + ipbffos fear]. Morbid dread of heart disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardiophobia (kar"de-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. napdia heart i fear]. Morbid dread of heart disease.
  55. cardiorenal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiorenal (kar-de-o-re'-nal) [cardio-; ren, kidney] Relating to the heart and the kidneys.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiorenal (kar"de-o-re'naI). Pertaining to the heart and the kidney.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cardiore'nal [G. kardia, heart, + L. Ten, kidney.] Cardionephric.
  56. cardiosclerosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiosclerosis (kar-de-o-skle-ro'-sis) [cardie^: , ' style='color:red;'>... to harden]. Induration of the tissues of the heart. See fibroid heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiosclerosis (kar"de-o-skle-ro'sis) [Gr. KapSia heart + aKKnpot hard]. Fibroid induration of the heart.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cardiosclero'sis [G. kardia, heart, + sklfrosis, hardening.] A condition of fibrous, or connectivetissue, overgrowth in the heart muscle and endocardium, associated usually with similar degenerative changes in the arteries.
  57. cardioscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardioscope (kar'-dc-o-skStf) [cardio-; a-corcf*, to view]. An instrument for the observation of the movements or of lesions of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardioscope (kar'de-o-skdp) [Gr. KapSia heart + cKo-miv to examine]. Same as cardiophone.
  58. cardiospasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiospasm (kar'-de-o-spasm) [cardio-; ewaffpi*, a drawing], i. A spasm of the heart. 2. Spasmodic contraction of the esophageal opening of the stomach.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiospasm (kar'de-o-spazm). Spasm of the cardiac orifice of the stomach.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      car'diospasm. i. Spasmodic action of the heart. 2. Spasmodic contraction of the cardiac end of the stomach.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'diospasm. i. Spasmodic action of the heart. ». Spasmodic contraction of the cardiac end of the stomach or of the adjoining portion of the esophagus.
  59. cardol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardol (kar'-def). See anacardium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardol (kar'dol). 1. An irritant and vesicating oil, CU1H30O2, from the husks of the cashew-nut, the fruit of Anaca/dium occidenta'le. 2. Tribromsalol, C„H,(OH)CO,.C,H,Brj: an intestinal antiseptic, hypnotic, and analgesic agent. Dose, 8-30 gr. (0.5-2 gm.).
  60. caricous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caricous (kar'-ik-us) (carica, a fig]. Fig-shaped, as a caricous tumor.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      caricous (kar'ik-us). Resembling a fig. [Lat., carica, a fig.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caricous (kar'ik-us) [L. car'ica fig]. Shaped like or resembling a fig.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'icous [L. carica, fig.] Relating to or having the semblance of a fig.
  61. cariosity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cariosity (kar-e-os'-it-c). See caries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cariosity (ka-re-os'it-e). The quality of being carious.
  62. carmin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carmin (kar'min). A red coloring-matter derived from cochineal: used as a histologic stain. borax c., an alkaline staining fluid made of borax, carmin, and water: used as a red nuclear stain. See stain:, table of. c.-red, a stain, uil,.,Orth's Klbium-farmin, under stains, table of. Schneider's C., a saturated solution of carmin in concentrated acetic acid.
  63. carneous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carneous (kar'-ne-us) [carneus, of flesh]. Fleshy. c. columns. See columnce carnea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'neous [L. corneas.] Fleshy.
  64. carnosity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carnosity (kar-nos'it-e) [L. carnos'itas fleshiness]. Any abnormal fleshy excrescence.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carnosity (kar-nos'it-e) [L. carnos'ilas fleshiness]. Any abnormal fleshy excrescence.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      carnos'ity. i. Fleshiness. 2. A fleshy protuberance.
  65. caroba - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caroba (kah-ro'bah). See Jacaranda.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caroba (kah-ro'bah). See Jacaranda.
  66. carolinium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'-c-um). The provisional namejjiven by Baskerville to a supposed new element obtained from thorium oxide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'e-um). A supposed element obtained from thorium oxid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'e-um). A supposed element obtained from thorium oxid.
  67. carotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carotic (kar-ot'-ik) [xApot. stupor]. I. Carotid. 2. Stupefying; or of the nature of stupor. 3. A drug to produce sleep.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carotic (kar-ot'ik) [Gr. xdpos torpor]. Pertaining to or of the nature of carus, or stupor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carotic (kar-ot'ik) [Gr. nipos torpor]. Pertaining to or of the nature of carus, or stupor.
  68. carotin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carotin (kar-ot'-is) [L.J. The carotid artery, c. cephalica, c. cerebralis, the Internal carotid artery, c. communis, the common carotid artery. c. externa, c. facialis, the external carotid artery. c. imerna, the internal carotid artery, c. primitivu, the common carotid artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carotin (karVtin). A coloring-matter from carrots and potatoes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carotin (kar'o-tin). A coloring-matter from carrots, sweet potatoes, and other vegetables, milk-fat, body fat, egg-yolk, etc. The pigment of the corpus luteum is probably identical with carotin.
  69. carpitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carpitis (kar-pi'-tis) \carpus; tri*. inflammation]. Inflammation of one or more of the carpal joints.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carpitis (kar-pi'tis). Inflammation of the synovial membranes of the bones of the carpal joint of domestic animals, producing swelling, pain, and lameness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carpitis (kar-pi'tis). Inflammation of the synovia! membranes of the bones of the carpal joint of domestic animals, producing swelling, pain, and lameness.
  70. carpopedal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carpopedal (kar-po-pef-daf) [carpo-; pes, pedis. a foot]. Affecting the wrists and feet, or the fingers and toes. c. contraction. See contraction, carpopedal. c. spasm, a spasm of the hands and feet, or of the thumbs and great toes, associated with laryngtsmus stridulus of children.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carpopedal (kar-po-pe'dal) [carpal + pedal]. Affecting the carpus and the foot.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carpopedal (kar-po-pe'dal) [carpal + pedal]. Affecting the carpus and the foot.
  71. carthamus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carthamus (karth'-am-u*) {Ar., qartama. paint]. American or bastard saffron or safflower. The flowers of C. tinctorius. An infusion, "Saffron tea," is a popular domestic remedy as a diuretic in measles and other exanthematous affections.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'thamus. Safflower, parrot-seed, false or bastard saffron, the dried florets of Carthamus tinctorius; sometimes used in domestic practice as a hot tea externally to "bring out the eruption" in exanthematous diseases.
  72. carum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carum (ka'-rum) {,....•, caraway]. Caraway. It is official in the U. S, P. in the form of the dried fruit of C. carvi. indigenous to Europe, and an allied species native to the Pacific coast of America. Its odor and taste are due to a volatile oil. It is used chiefly as a flavor. C. petrosclinum, parsley, is diuretic and sedative, carui, aqua (B. P.)', caraway water. Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). carui, infusum, 2 dr. to i pint. Dose j-2 oz. (15-60 Cc.). carui, oleum (U. S. P.), oil of caraway. Dose 1-5 min. (0.06-0.3 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ca'rum (U.S.), ca'rui fruc'tus (Br.). Caraway, caraway fruit; the dried nearly ripe fruit of Carum carvi (or carui), a biennial plant cultivated extensively in Siberia, Northern Europe, and the
  73. caruncula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caruncula (kar-ung'-ku-lah) [dim. of caro, flesh; pi., caruncula]. A caruncle, carunculn cuticulares, the nymphae. c. innominata, the lacrimal gland, c. major, a caruncle marking the common orifice of the common bile-duct and the pancreatic duct. c. mammillaris. i. The olfactory tubercle, between the roots of the olfactory nerves. 2. The enlarged ends of the galactophorous ducts in the nipple. c. minor, one in the duodenum in the center of which a supplementary pancreatic duct occasionally opens, c. Morgagnii, the middle lobe of the prostate, carunculie myrtiformes, the projections of membrane near the orifice of the vagina, thought to be the remains of the hymen after its rupture. caruncul«e papillares. See papilla, renal, c. saltvalis. See c. sublingualis. c. sublingualis, one marking the orifice of Wharton's duct. Syn., papilla saltvalis inferior, c. 'urethrae. See caruncle, urethral.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      carun'cula. See caruncle, carunculno ' uticularcs. The nymphae. carunculae liymcnalcs. See carunculae myrtiformes. v. lacrimalis. See lacrimal caruncle, under caruncle, c. major. A papilla marking the common orifice of the ductus choledochus communis and the pancreatic duct. c. ma mini I hi lis. 1. A small elevation of gray nervous matter at the base of the brain, giving rise to the middle root of the olfactory nerve. 2. The dilated extremities of the galactophorous ducts in the nipple, c. minor. A papilla in the duodenum, in the center of which an occasional supplementary pancreatic duct opens. carunculae myrtiformes. Irregular tonguelike projections of the mucous membrane of the ostium vaginae, the remains of the ruptured hymen, c. oculi. See lacrimal caruncle, under caruncle, carunculae papillares. Little nipplelilce projections at the hilum of the kidney marking the orifices of the uriniferous tubules, c. salivalis. See c. sublingualis, c. seminal is. See caput galli. e. sublingualis. A papilla marking the opening of Wharton's duct. c urcthrae. See urethral caruncle, c. urethrae virills. See caput gallinaginis. carunculuc vaginalcs. See carunculae myrtiformes. [B. N. A., same.] II.at., dim. of caro, flesh.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caruncula (kar-ung'ku-lah), pi. carun'cula:. Latin for caruncle, c. hymena'les [B N A). See c. myrtiformes. c. mammilla'ris, the tuber olfactorium; the gray mass from which the middle root of the olfactory nerve arises, c. myrtifor'mes, small elevations surrounding the vaginal orifice, supposed to be relics of the ruptured hymen. C. saliva ris. c. sublingua lis [B N A], a little eminence on each side of the frenum of the tongue, at the apex of which is the opening of the duct of the sublingual gland.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caruncula (kar-ung'ku-lah) [L. a small fleshy mass.] Caruncle, c. hymena'lis (pi. caruncula hymenales) [BNA], c. myrtiformis, one of the numerous tabs or projections surrounding the orifice of the vagina after rupture of the hymen, c. lacrima'lis, a small reddish body at the inner canthus of the eye, containing modified sebaceous and sweat glands, c. ma'jor of Santori'ni, papilla duodeni. c. mamilla'ris, the collection of gray matter giving origin to part of the olfactory nerve, tuberculum olfactorium. c. Horgagn'ii, the middle lobe of the prostate gland. c. myr:jf.,r'mis (pi. caruncula myrtiformes), c. hymenalis [BNA]. c. saliva'ris, c. sublingual c. Gublingua'lii, a papilla on each side of the frenulum linguae marking the opening of the submaxillary (Wharton's) duct.
  74. caruncular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caruncular (kar-ung'-ku-lar) 1 caruncula, a caruncle]. Like or pertaining to a caruncle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      carun'cular. Of, or of the nature of, or pertaining to, a caruncle.
  75. carvene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carvene (kanf-en) [It., carvi, caraway], CiiHw. A hydrocarbon contained in caraway. It is a fight terpene. See also citrene.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carvene (kar-venO [L. car'vi caraway]. A terpene, C,0Hia, from oil of caraway.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      car'vene. A terpene, GoHuO, present in oil of anise, from which carvacrol is prepared.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carvene (kar-ven') [L. car'vi caraway]. A terpene, C10H,ij, from oil of caraway.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      carvene (kar'ven). A tasteless and odorless terpene, CioHu, obtained from oil of caraway.
  76. caryocinesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryocinesis (fcar-e-o-sinV-jti). See karyokineris.
  77. caryolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryolysis (kor-c-ol'-is-is). See karyolysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caryolysis (kar-I-ol'i-sis) [G. karyon, nut (nucleus), + lysis, solution.] Apparent destruction of the nucleus, at least the loss of affinity of its chromatin for basic dyes; chromatolysis.
  78. caryophyllus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryophyllus (kar-e-o-fl'-us) ',..',,„-.«•. a nut: Eugenia aromatica, distinguished by the'r pungent, spicy taste. Its pronei ties are due to a volatile oil. which is antiseptic, stimulant, and irritant. It also contains a crystalline body, eugenin, CioHiiOi, and a camphor, caryophyllin, CioHnO. It is useful as a stomachic and to prevent "griping" when combined with purgatives. caryophyUi, infusum (B. P.), a strength of i to 40 is recommended. Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). CJiryophyUi, oleum (U. S. P.), oil of cloves, contains an acid and a phenol compound. Dose 1-4 min. (o.ofr-o.24 Cc.). It is used also by microscopists to clarify preparations and tissues for mounting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caryophyllus (kaK'e-o-fil'us) [Gr. xapvov nut + ifbWov leaf]. Latin for clove.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      caryophyllus (ka-ry-o-fil'us). The dried flower buds of Eugenia ar&malica. oleum caryophylli. Oil of cloves. A volatile oil distilled from caryophillus. It is carminative and mildly antiseptic. Caryophyllum [Br. Ph.]. Cloves [Gr., karyon, nut -f- phyllon, leaf.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caryophyllus (kar['e-o-fil'us) [Gr. itapvov nut -fleaf]- Latin for clove.
  79. cascarilla - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cascarilla (.kas-kar-il'-ah) [Sp., dim. of casca, bark]. The bark of Crolon eluleria. native to the Bahama Islands, an aromatic bitter, increasing the natural secretions of the digestive organs, cascarilla:, infusum (B. P.). Dose i-j oz. (30-60 Cc.). cascarilUe, tinctura (B. P.). Dose }--a dr. (2-8 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cascarilla (kas-kah-ril'ah). 1. The bark of Cro'ton clule'ria, a small tree of tropical America: a tonic and aromatic stomachic. Dose in powder, 2030 gr. (1.3-1.85 gm). Its tincture and infusion are also prescribed. 2. A genus of rubiaceous trees allied to Cincho'na: the bark of C. hexan'dra is an unofficial cinchona substitute.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cascarilla (kas-kar-il'lah). 1. A name applied to various barks, especially Cinchona and its allies. 2. The genus Croton. 3. A genus of rubiaceous trees. 4. Of the Br. Ph., the dried bark of Croro» eluteria. infusum cascarlllac. A 5 per cent, infusion made with boiling water [Br. Ph.]. tinctura cascarlllac. A 20 per cent, tincture of cascarilla [Br. Ph.]. [Span., dim. of cascara, bark.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cascarilla (kas-kah-ril'ah). i. The bark of Crouton elate1 ria. a small tree of tropical America: a tonic and aromatic stomachic. Dose in powder, 2030 gr. (1.3-1.85 gm.). Its tincture and infusion are also prescribed. 2. A genus of rubiaceous trees allied to Cincho'na: the bark of C. heran'dra is an unofficial cinchona substitute.
  80. casease - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      casease (ka'-se-as). An enzyme which digests casein, found by Duclaux and produced by bacteria, notably Tyrothrix tenuis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      casease (ka'se-Ss) [L. ca'seus cheese]. A ferment derived from bacterial cultures, capable of dissolving albumin and the casein of milk and cheese.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      casease (ka'se-as) [L. ca'seus cheese]. A ferment derived from bacterial cultures, capable of dissolving albumin and the casein of milk and cheese.
  81. caseation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caseation (ha-u-a'-shun) [casein]. The precipitation of casein during the coagulation of milk. Also a form of degeneration in which the structure is converted into a soft, cheese-like substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caseation (ka-se-a'shun) [L. ca'seus cheese]. The precipitation of casein; also, cheesy degeneration; conversion into cheese-like matter.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      caseation (ka-se-a'shun). A process by(irif production]. Retrogressive evolution.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catagenesis (kat-ah-jen'e-sis) [G. kala, down, + genesis, production.] Involution.
  82. cataleptoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cataleptoid (kat-al-ep'-toid) [catalepsy; tl&ot. likeness], IJlce catalepsy, c. state, a condition due to neuromuscular excitability and differing from true catalepsy in that the limbs must""be held in fixed attitudes for a few seconds before they maintain themselves and friction causes them to become limp.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cataleptoid (kat-al-ep'toid). Resembling catalepsy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catalep'toid [G. eidos, resemblance.] Simulating or resembling catalepsy.
  83. catalyzer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      catalyzer (kat-a-li'-zur). Any substance that accelerates chemical or physical processes which would occur without it.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      catalyzer (kat'al-i-zer). A substance causing or producing catalysis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      catalyzer (kat'al-i-zer). A substance producing catalysts: a substance which modifies the velocity of a chemic or physical process, negative c., a substance that retards the action of a catalyzer by acting on the substratum, positive c., a catalyzer which accelerates the velocity of a reaction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cat'alyzer. Catalyst.
  84. catapasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      catapasm (kal'-ap-azm) [rar&rfurpa. powder]. A dry powder to be sprinkled upon the skin or upon a sore.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      catapasm (kat'ah-pazm) [Gr. Kardiraa/ju]. A powder to be applied to the surface.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cat'apasm. A dusting powder. [Gr., katapasma, a powder.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      catapasm (kat'ah-pazm) [Gr. icoTdiro<r/»a]- A powder to be applied to the surface.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catapasm (kat'ah-pazm) [G. katapasma, a powder; katapassd, I sprinkle over.] A dusting powder applied to raw surfaces or ulcers.
  85. cataractous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cataractous (kat-ar-ak'tus). Of the nature of cataract; affected with a cataract.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catarac'tous. Relating to a cataract.
  86. catastaltic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      catastaltic (kal-as-laT-lik) [«ar<urr{XX<c», to check, to send downward]. i. Astringent. 2. Passing from above downward (as a nerve-impulse). 3. An inhibitory or sedative agent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      catastaltic (kat-as-tal'tik) [Gr. xaracrraXriicfa]. i. Inhibitory; restraining. 2. An agent which tends to restrain or check any process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catastal'tic [G. katasttllo, I check.] i. Inhibitory, restricting or restraining. 2. An inhibitory or checking agent, such as an astringent or antispasmodic.
  87. catelectrotonus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      catelectrotonus (kat-tl-ek-traf-o-nus) [cart, down: 4X«KTpof, arnber; r6ros, tension]. The state of increased irritability of a nerve near the cathode See aneltctrotonus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      catelectrotonus (kat"el-ek-trot'o-nus) [Gr. down + clectrotonus]. Increase of irritabilit a nerve or muscle when near the cathode.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      catelectrotonus (kat"el-ek-trot'o-nus) [Gr. Ko.to. down + electrotonus]. Increase of irritability of a nerve or muscle when near the cathode.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catelectrot'onus [cathode + zlectrotonus.] The change of electrical irritability and conductivity in a nerve or muscle in the neighborhood of the cathode.
  88. cathartin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cathartin (kalh-or'-lin). A bitter principle found in rhubarb, senna and jalap.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cathartin (kath-ar'tin). A bitter principle from senna and from jalap, and another from Rham'nus cathar'iieus, or buckthorn.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cathar'tin. Cathartic acid, an extractive from rhubarb and senna; a brownish powder, cathartic in doses of gr. 3-5 (0.13-0.3).
  89. cathisophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cathisophobia (kath-is-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. ,.n'h,;tiy to sit down + ipiflos fear). See akathisia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cathisophobia (kath-is-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. xadiftti> to sit down -I V'i'^m fear]. See akalhisia,
  90. cathodograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cathodograph (kath-od'o-graf). A skiagram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cathodograph (kath-od'o-graf). A skiagram.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cathodograph (ka-tho'do-graf). An *-ray picture, skiagram.
  91. cattle-plague - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cattle-plague. See Rinderpest.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cattle-plague. See under plague.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cattle-plague. See under plague.
  92. caudad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caudad (kaw'dad). In a caudal direction; toward a cauda or tail.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caudad (kaw'dad). In a caudal direction; toward a cauda or tail.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caudad (kaw'dad). In a posterior direction, or toward the tail.
  93. caudatum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caudatum (kaw-da'-tum). See corpus striatum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caudatum (kaw-da'tum) [LJ. The nucleus caudatus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caudatum (kaw-da'tum) [L.]. The nucleus caudatus.
  94. cauter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cauter (kaw'ter) [Gr. icavrSp]. A metallic instrument to be heated and used in actual cautery.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cauter (kaw'ter). A cautery iron.
  95. cauterant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cauterant (kaw'ter-ant). i. Any caustic material or application. 2. Caustic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cauterant (kaw'ter-ant). i. Cauterizing 2. A cauterizing agent.
  96. cavernoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cavernoma (kav-er-no'mah), pi. caternomaHa. Cavernous angioma; a vascular tumor with large blood-filled spaces, c. lymphat'icum. Same as lymphangioma caternosum.
  97. cavum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cavum (ka'-vum) [L,]. Any hollow or cavity, normal or pathological, c. abdominis, the cavity of the abdomen, c. articulare, joint cavity, c. conchas, the deepest part of the concave surface of the concha, c. dentis, the pulp-cavity of a tooth, c. epidurale, epidural cavity, c. luryngis, cavity of larynx, c. Meckelii. See Meckel's canty, c. mediastinale anterius, anterior mediastinal cavity, c. mediastinale posterius, posterior mediastinal cavity. c. medullare, the medullary canal of bones, c. nasi, nasal cavity, c. oris proprius, the cavity of the mouth proper, c. pelvis, pelvic cavity, c. pericardii, the pericardia! cavity, c. peritona'i, the peritoneal cavity, c. pharyngis, cavity of pharynx, c. pleurae, the pleural cavity, c. Retzii. See Retzius's space, c. septj, th« embryonal fifth ventricle of the brain. c. septi pellucidi, cavity of septum pellucidum, the fifth ventricle, c. subarachnoideale, the subarachnoid space, c. fhoracis, thoracic cavity, c. subdurale, the subdural space, the interval between the dura mater and the arachnoid, c. thoracis, thoracic cavity, c. tympani, the tympanic cavity. c. uteri, the cavity of the uterus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cavum (ka'vum) [L. "a hollow"]. Any open space or cavity. C. abdpm'inis |H N A], the abdominal cavity, c. articula're (B N A], a joint cavity, c. con'chn [B N A), the cavity of the concha, c. epidura'le [B N A], the epidural cavity, c. meck'lii, Meckel's cavity, c. mediastina le ante ring [B N A], the anterior mediastinum, c. mediastina'le poste'rius [B N A], the posterior mediastinum, c. medulla're, the medullary cavity of a bone. c. na'si [B N A], the nasal fossa. C. o'ris [B N A], the cavity or hollow of the mouth, c. pel via [B N A), the pelvic cavity. C. peritonse'i [B N A], peritoneal cavity. C. plu'rre [B N A], the pleura] cavity. C. ret'isii, the space formed when the fold of the peritoneum in front of the bladder is raised by distention of the bladder, c. sep'ti pellu'cidi [B N A], the fifth ventricle, c. subarachnoida'le |B N A|, the subarachnoid space, c. subdura'le [B N A), the subdural space, c. thora'cis [B N Aj, the thoracic cavity, c. tym'pani [B N A], the cavity of the tympanum, c. u'tari [B N A|, the uterine cavity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ca'vum [L.] A hollow, hole, or cavity, c. abdomina'le, c. abdom'inis, the abdominal cavity. c. articula're, a joint cavity, c. con'chte, cavity of the concha, the lower, larger, portion of the concha below the crus helicis; it forms the vestibule to the external auditory meatus. c. Doug'lasi, excavatio rectouterina [BNA]. c. epidura'le, epidural cavity, the space between the walls of the spinal canal and the dura mater of the cord. c. mediastina'le, mediastinum. c. m. ante'rius [BNA], anterior mediastinum. c. m. poste'rius [BNA], posterior mediastinum. c. o'ris, cavity of the mouth, the space between the dental arches, limited posteriorly by the isthmus of the fauces, c. pel'vis, the pelvic cavity, c. pcritonee'i, peritoneal cavity, the interior of the sac formed by the parietal layer of the peritoneum, containing all the abdominal organs except the kidneys, c. pleu'ree [BNA], pleural cavity, c. Ret'zii, preperitoneal space,
  98. cecostomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cecostomy (se-kos'-to-me) [cecum; arttna, a mouth]. The formation of an artificial anus in the cecum.
  99. cedrene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cedrene (se'-drln) [cedrus, cedar], CiiHu. A volatile liquid hydrocarbon found in oil of red cedar (see Juniperus tirginiana), oil of cloves and oil of cubebs. c. camphor, CuHnO, a camphor that separates from the oil of red cedar.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cedrene (sed'ren). A terpene from the oil of red cedar; also any terpene of the same composition with it.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cedrene (sed'ren). A terpene from the oil of red cedar; also any terpene of the same composition with it.
  100. cedrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cedrin (st'-drin) [cedrus, cedar]. A bitter crystalline substance obtained from cedron.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cedrin (se'drin). A bitter principle, in yellow crystals, from the seeds of Sima'ba ce'dron: febrifuge
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cedrin (se'drin). A bitter principle, in yellow crystals, from the seeds of .s'.-»m'(chiton; febrifuge.
  101. celation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      celation (sel-a'-shun) [ce olio, a hiding]. The concealment of illness, of a birth, or of piegnancy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      celation (se-la'shun) [L. cela're to conceal]. The concealing of pregnancy or of the birth of a child.
  102. cellon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellon (sel'on). Acetylene tetrachlorid, CHC CHClj, or tetrachlorethane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellon (sel'on). Acetylene tetrachlorid, CHCls.CHClj, or tetrachlorethane.
  103. cellophan - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellophan (scl'o-fan). A cellulose product: used in a filtering medium, and for bandages, compres: etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellophan (sel'o-fan). A cellulose product: used as a filtering medium, and for bandages, compresses, etc.
  104. cellose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellose (sel'&s). A substance formed by the hyd ysis of cellulose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellose (scl'os). A substance formed by the hydrolysis of cellulose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cell'ose. A product of the hydrolysis of cellulose.
  105. cellulin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellulin (sel'u-lin). A principle of animal 01 much resembling cellulose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellulin (sel'u-lin). A principle of animal origin much resembling cellulose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cell'ulin. Cellulose.
  106. cellulosity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cellulosity (sel-u-los'-e-te). The condition of being cellular.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellulosity (sel-u-los'it-e). The condition of being composed of cells.
  107. celology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      celology (sd-ol'-o-je) MXi>. hernia; XAyoi, science). That branch of surgical science that treats of hernia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      celology (se-lol'o-je) [Gr. ic^X>) hernia + XA^-oj treatise]. The science or study of hernia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      celol'ogy [G. kill, hernia, + -logia.] The branch of surgery which has to do with hernia.
  108. cementoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cementoma (se-menl-o'-man) [cttmentum. cement; iVn. tumor; pi., cementomata\. A tumor thrown out by the irritated alveolar periosteum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cementoma (se-men-to'mah). A tumor composed of cement like that of the teeth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cementoma (se-men-to'mah). A tumor composed of cement like that of the teeth.
  109. cenophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cenophobia. See xenophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cenophobia (sen-o-fo'be-ah). Same as kenophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenophobia (sen-o-fo'be-ah). Same as kmophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cenopho'bia [G. kenos, empty, + phobos, fear.] A morbid dread of being in an open space, agoraphobia.
  110. cenosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cenosis (sen-o'-sis) [xiybwn, a draining), i. Evacuation; apocenosis. 2. Inanition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenosis (se-no'sis) [Gr.]. A morbid discharge.
  111. cenosite - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cenosite (se'no-slt) [Gr. Kolvm common + o-frot food]. A parasite which is able to live apart from its host.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenosite (se'no-slt) [Gr. toivtn common -f ctlrot food]. A parasite which is able to live apart from its host.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cenosite (se'no-sit) [G. koinos, common, + silos, food.] A facultative commensal organism; one which can sustain itself apart from its usual host. censor (sen'sor) [L. censere, to value, judge.] The psychic barrier which prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
  112. centa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centa. mazamorra (maz-am-o'rah). Ground-itch. See
  113. centaurium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centaurium (sen-taw're-um). Centaury.
  114. centaury - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      centaury (sen'-law-re) [cenlaureo]. A popular name for various plants of the genera Centaurea. Erythraa, Sabbatia, Chlora, etc., especially Erythraa centaurium. which is used as a simple, bitter tonic. Dose j-i dr. (2-4 Cc.) in decoction several times a day.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centaury.»
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      centaury.»
  115. centibar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centibar (sen'tib-ar). The one-hundredth part of a. bar, a unit of atmospheric pressure.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      centibar (sen'tl-bar). A unit of atmospheric pressure, the hundredth part of a bar.
  116. centinormal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      centinormal (sen-le-nor'-maT) [centi-; norms, normal]. The Tffv of the normal; applied to a solution the yi, of the strength of a normal solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centinormal (sen-tin-or'mal) [L. cen'tum hundred + nor'ma rule]. Having jj0 part of the normal or standard strength.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centinormal (sen-tin-or'mal) [L. cen'tum hundred 4- nor'ma rule]. Having jjj part of the normal or standard strength.
  117. centrifugalization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centrifugalization (sen"trif-u-gal-iz-a'shun) [see centrifuge]. The process of separating the more solid portions of a liquid from the more fluid ones by centrifugal force.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centrifugalization (sen"trif-u-gal-iz-a'shun) [see i'-i:iri:ni'i\. The process of separating the more solid portions of a liquid from the more fluid ones by centrifugal force.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      centrifugaliza'tion. The sedimentation of solids suspended in a fluid, by means of the centrifuge. rentrif ugahze. To submit to rapid rotary action
  118. centrolecithal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      centrolecithal (sen-tro-les'-ith-al) [centra-; Xhitfot. ycftj. In embryology, having the food-yolk located centrally,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centrolecithal (sen-tro-les'ith-al) [Gr. Kotoov center + XhuSot yolk]. Having the yolk in the center and surrounded by a peripheral layer of egg protoplasm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centrolecithal (sen-tro-les'ith-al) [Gr. nivrpov center + X«i0os yolk]. Having the yolk in the center and surrounded by a peripheral layer of egg protoplasm.
  119. cephalad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cephalad (sef'-ol-ad) [cephal-; ad, to]. Toward the head.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cephalad (sef'al-ad) [Gr. uhead]. Toward the head.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ceph'alad [G. kephale, head.] In a direction toward the head or the anterior pole.
  120. cephalitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cephalitis (sef-al-i'-tis). See encephalitis. c. JEgvptiaca, an epidemic form of encephalitis occurring in Egypt during the hot winds of early summer. c. littnana, inflammation of the epiphyses. c. meningica. meninsitis. c. nervosa. penussis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cephalitis (sef-al-i'tis). Same as encephalitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cephalitis (sef-al-i'(e')tis). Inflammation of the brain, encephalitis.
  121. cephalothoracopagus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cephalothoracopagus (sef-al-o-tho-rak-op'-ag-us) [cephalo-; 0Apo{, thorax; irafcb, joined). A doubleheaded monster with united thoraces and necks. These monsters are divided by Veit into prosopolhoracopagus and syitcephalus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cephalothoracopagus(sef"al-o-tho-rak-op'ag-us). A double monster consisting of two fetuses joined by the head and thorax.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ceph"alothoracop'agus [G. kephall, head, + thorax, chest, 4- pcgnymi, I fasten together.] A double monster attached by the head and thorax.
  122. ceptor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceptor (sep'-lor) [capere, to take]. A term suggested by Ehrlich in place of intermediary body. According to the manner of action he distinguishes uniceplors and amboceptors.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceptor (sep'tor). i. See Ehrlich's side-chain theory under theory. 2. Any one of the nervous apparatus for, or organs which, receive external stimuli or impressions and transfer them to the nerve-centers. Cf. beneceptor and nociceptor. chemical c., a ceptor which transforms proper stimuli into chemical reactions in the body, contact C., a ceptor which receives stimuli of direct physical contact, distance c., the nervous apparatus through which an individual perceives or is affected by his distant environment, effector C., a ceptor in the brain which receives impulses of special actions and becomes so trained for them that subsequent similar impulses are much facilitated, nerve c. Same as ceptor, 2d def.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cep'tor [L. caperc. to take.] i. In Ehrlich's theory of immunity, a receptor which has been thrown
  123. ceral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceral (se'-raT). Pasta cerata. a proprietary vehicle for application of medicaments, said to consist of wax, potash, and water.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceral (se'ral) [L. ce'ra wax]. Pasta cerata, a proprietary vehicle for the external application of medicines: it contains wax, potash, and water.
  124. cerasin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerasin (ser'-as-in) [cerasvs, a cherry-tree), i. An ingredient of the gum of cherry-, peach-, and plumtrees, apparently identical with bassorin. 2. A crude precipitate from tincture of choke-cherry.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerasin (ser'as-in). i. A substance from the gum of cherry, plum, and other trees: said to be a carbohydrate charged with a lime-salt. 2. A compound, CioHmNjOu, formed by treating brain tissue with barium hydroxid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ce'rasin. An eclectic preparation from wild cherry bark; a brown powder, employed as a bitter tonic, sedative, and expectorant in coughs, colds, palpitation, and general debility, in doses of gr. a-io (o. 13-0.6).
  125. cerasus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerasus (ser'as-us). Latin for cherry or cherry tree. See Prunus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'asus [L.] Cherry: see prunus.
  126. ceratin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceratin («r'-keratin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratin (ser'ah-tin). Same as keratin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratin (ser'ah-tin). Same as keratin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'atin. Keratin.
  127. ceratine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratine (ser'at-en). A proprietary ointment for skin diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratine (ser/at-€n). A proprietary ointment for skin diseases.
  128. ceratum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratum (se-ra'tum). Latin for cerate. See cerate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratum (se-ra'tum). Latin for cerate. See cerate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cera'tum [L. ceratus, waxed.] Cerate, an unctuous solid preparation, harder than an ointment, containing sufficient wax to prevent it from melting when applied to the skin. The U.S.P. ceratum, simple cerate, contains white wax 30, white petrolatum 30, benzoinated lard 50. c. calami'nje, Turner's cerate, calamine and yellow wax, of each 15, olive oil 40, application for burns, c. campho'rrp, camphor cerate; contains camphor liniment 10, white wax 35, white petrolatum 15, benzoinated lard, 40. c. campho'rae compos'Itum, compound camphor cerate, camphor ice; camphor 10.7, benzoic acid I, phenol 0.2, oil of bitter almond o.i, in a firm mixture of white wax, spermaceti, and castor oil to make 100; antiseptic and protective application for chapped lips, hands, etc. c. canthar'idis, cantharides cerate, contains cantharides 32, yellow wax 18, rosin 18, lard 17, liquid petrolatum 13; used locally as an epispastic. c. ceta'cei, spermaceti cerate, contains spermaceti 10, white wax 35, olive oil 55. c. fla'vura, yellow cerate, a mixture of yellow wax 10, oil of sweet almond 35, water 25. c. gale'ni, cold cream, unguentum* aqtue rosae. c. iodofor'mi, iodoform cerate, equal parts of iodoform and hard paraffin, c. petro'lei, soft white paraffin 2, hard paraffin i. c. plum'bi subaceta'tis, cerate of lead subacetate, Goulard's cerate, contains solution of lead subacetate 30, wool-fat 20, paraffin 20, white petrolatum 38, camphor a. c. resi'nrfi, rosin cerate, basilicon ointment; contains rosin 35, yellow wax 15, lard 50. c. lesi'na compos'itum (N.P.), compound rosin cerate. Deshler's salve; contains rosin 23.5, yellow wax 22.5. prepared suet 30, turpentine 11.5, Unseed oil 13.5.
  129. cerclage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerclage (sar-klazhO [Fr. an encircling). Binding together of the ends of a fractured bone by a metal ring or wire loop.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerclage (sair-klazh') [P. an encircling, hooping, banding.] Binding together the ends of an obliquely fractured bone or the fragments of a broken patella, brought into close apposition, by an encircling wire loop or bandage, tightly drawn, or a ring.
  130. cercomonad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cercomonad (ser-ko-mo'-nad). A member of the genus cercomonas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cercomonad (ser-kom'o-nad). Any monad or protozoon of the genus Cercom'onas.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cercomonad (ser-kom'o-nad). Any monad or pro
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cercom'onad. A unicellular organism of the genus Cercomonas.
  131. cerealin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerealin (se-rc'-al-in). An enzyme converting •tarch into glucose, isolated from bran-extract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerealin (se-re'al-in). A ferment contained in brain extract and capable of converting starch into glucose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cere'alin. A diastase obtained from bran.
  132. cerebellospinal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebellospinal (scr"e-bel-o-spi'nal). Pertaining to the cerebellum and spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerebellospi'nal. Relating to the cerebellum and the spinal cord.
  133. cerebrifugal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebrifugal (ser-e-brif'-u-eat) [cerebrum, the brain; fugere, to flee]. Centrifugal; efferent; transmitting or transmitted from the brain to the periphery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebrifugal (ser-e-brif'u-gal) [L. cer'ebrum brain + fu'gere to flee]. Conveying impulses away from the brain; centrifugal or exodic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerebrifugal (ser-e-brif'u-gal) [L. fugere, to flee.] Proceeding away from the brain, noting efferent nerve-fibers or impulses.
  134. cerebrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebrin (ser'-e-brin) [cerebrum], i. CnHnNOi. A nitrogenous glucoside obtained from brain-tissue, nerves, and pus-corpuscles. It is a light, colorless, exceedingly hygroscopic powder. 2. A preparation from the gray mattei of the brain of sheep and calves, made with equal parts of glycerol and 0.5 %of phenol solution. It has been used in chorea. Dose 5-10 min. (0.3-0.6 Cc.). Syn., cerebrin-alpha; cerebrinin. 3. A proprietary antineuralgic elixir, said to contain analgesin, ether, caffeine and cocaine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebrin (ser'e-brin). 1. A colorless, fatty principle, C^HjaNOj, from brain tissue; also any one of a group of such principles found in nerve tissue, yolk of egg, spleen, etc. 2. A remedy prepared from brain substance, alpha-c. See cerebrinin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'ebrin. i. One of a number of fatty nitrogenous substances, containing no phosphorus, derived from nerve-tissue, yolk of egg, and various organs. 9. A brain extract which has been employed therapeutically.
  135. cerebripetal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebripetal (ser-e-brip'-el-af) [cerebrum, the brain; petere, to seek). Centripetal; afferent; transmitting or transmitted from the periphery to the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebripetal (ser-e-brip'et-al) [L. cer'ebrum brain + pet ere to seek]. Conducting or proceeding toward the cerebrum; afferent or centripetal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerebripetal (ser-e-brip'et-al) [L. cer'ebrum brain
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerebrip'etal [L. petere, to seek.] Proceeding toward the brain or cerebrum, noting nerve-fibers or impulses.
  136. cerebritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebritis (ser-e-bri'-lis) [cerebrum; Itii, inflammation]. Inflammation of the proper substance of the cerebrum, c., local, softening of the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebritis (ser-e-bri'tis). Inflammation of the cerebrum, saturnine C, brain inflammation due to lead-poisoning.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerebritis (ser-e-bri'(bre')tis). Inflammation of the brain, more particularly of the cerebrum.
  137. cerebroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebroid (sef-e-broid) [cerebro-; Mas, likeness]. Resembling brain-substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebroid (ser'e-broid). Resembling the brain substance.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'ebroid [L. cerebrum, brain, + G. cidos, resemblance.] Cerebriform, encephaloid. cer'ebrol. An oily reddish liquid obtainable from
  138. cerebrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebrol (ser'-e-brot) [cerebrum, brain; oleum, oil]. An oily, reddish fluid obtainable from brain-tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebrol (ser'eb-rol). An oily substance from the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerebrol (ser'eb-rol). An oily substance from the brain.
  139. cerebrose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebrose (ser'-e-bros) [cerebrum], CaHizOs. A crystallized sugar isomeric with glucose, occurring in brain tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'ebrose. A sugar, t_'rM,:„. obtainable from brain-tissue.
  140. ceromel - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceromel (se'-ro-mel) [cera,f wax; mel, honey]. Honey cerate; wax, one pait; honey, two or four parts. It 13 applied to wounds and ulcers, chiefly in Asiatic countries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceromel (se'ro-mel) [L. ce'ra wax + met honey], A mixture of wax and honey: sometimes used as a cerate and wound dressing.
  141. ceryl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceryl (se'ril). A univalent hydrocarbon radicle of the fatty series, having the formula CnHu.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ceryl (se'ril). A univalcnt hydrocarbon radicle of the fatty scries of the constituent C^Hri. c. alcohol. A monatomic alcohol, CsuHwOH, obtained by the decomposition of Chinese wax. c. eorotate. A compound, CsoHMO.OC.Cal IM, of c.
  142. cestrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ces'trum. Estrus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ces'trum. Estrus.
  143. cetrarin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cetrarin (se-Jra'-ri*) [catra, a short Spanish shield]. The bitter principle of Iceland moss, crystallizing in fine needles, and nearly Insoluble In water.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cetrarin (se-tra'rin). A bitter, crystallizable principle, CnHnOu, from Celra'ria islan'diea, or Iceland moss. It stimulates peristalsis and the secretions of the digestive tract. Dose, 1^-3 gr. (0.099-0.2 gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cetrarin (se-tra'rin). A bitter, crystallizable principle, CwHsoO,,, from Cetra'ria islan'dica, or Iceland moss. It stimulates peristalsis and the secretions of the digestive tract. Dose, 1^-3 gr. (0.099-0-2 gm.).
  144. cevadilla - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'-ah). See sabadilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'ah). Same as sabadilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'ah). Same as sabadiUa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cevadil'la [Sp. dim. of cebada, barley.] Sabadilla.
  145. chalcosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chalcosis (in/-io'-ji'j) [x«X«4i. copper]. A deposit of copper particles in the tissues, chalice-tell (r*ol'-».0. Goblet cell, chalicosis (kol-ik-o'-sis) [xi^»f. gravel]. A disease of the lungs caused by the inhalation of dust or sand, challnoplasty (kal-in-o-plos'-te) [xaXirfe. a bridle or rein; irX4»» i». to form]. An operation to form a new f renum of the tongue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chalcosis (kal-ko'sis) [Gr. p^aXico; copper]. The presence of copper deposits in the tissues.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chalcosis (kal-ko'sis) [G. chalkos, copper.] i. Chronic copper poisoning, a. A deposit of fine particles of copper in the lungs or other parts.
  146. chalicosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chalicosis (kal-ik-o'sis) [Gr. ydXif gravel]. A disorder of the lungs or bronchioles (chiefly among stonecutters), due to the inhalation of fine particles of stones; a form of pneumoconiosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chalicosis (kal-ik-o'sis) [Gr. vdXif gravel]. A disorder of the lungs or bronchioles (chiefly among stonecutters), due to the inhalation of fine particles of stones; a form of pneumoconiosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chalicosis (kal-e-ko'sis) [G. chalix, gravel.] Pneumonoconiosis caused by the inhalation of dust incident to the occupation of stone-cutting.
  147. chancroidal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chancroidal (shang-kroi'-dal). Pertaining to or of the nature of a chancroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chancroidal (shang-kroi'dal). Pertaining to chancroid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chancroid'al. Relating to or of the nature of
  148. chancrous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chancrous (skang'-krus). Chancre-like.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chancrous (shang'krus). Of the nature of chancre.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chancrous (shang'krus). Relating to chancre, change of life. Menopause, climacteric. chann'el [L. .units.'] Canal, a passage through
  149. chartula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      char'tula. A little paper; in prescriptions, a powder, i. e., a paper containing a medicine in the form of powder, usually a single dose. c. eerata. A powder wrapped in wax paper. [Lat. dim. of r/uzr/a.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chartula (kart'u-lah), pi. charfida [L. dim. of char'la paper). A small piece of paper, as for containing a dose of a medicinal powder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chartula (kar'tu-lah) [L. dim. of charta, paper.] Charta (a).
  150. cheloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cheloid (ke'-loid). See krlniil.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cheloid (ke'loid) [Gr. xi?Xi} claw + ttdot form]. See Moid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cheloid (keloid) [G. chile, a claw, + eidos, resemblance.] A fibrous growth of the cicatricial type of connective tissue, arising in consequence of irritation and usually from a scar; keloid.
  151. chemism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chemism (kem'-izm) [xnspagirism. 3. The theory tha' assumes the development of the universe to be due to chemical processes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chemism (kem'izm). Chemic activity; chemic property or relationship.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chemism (kem'izm). Chemical action or influence.
  152. chemoceptor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chemoceptor (ktm-o-stp'-tor). One of the side chains or receptors in a living cell, having the power of fixing chemical substances in the same way that bacterial toxins are fixed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chemoceptor (kem'o-sep'tor) One of the side chains or receptors in a living cell, having an affinity for and fixing the chemical substances or drugs.
  153. chemolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chemolysis (kem-ol'-is-is). Chemical decomposition.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chemolysis (kern-oll-sis). Chemical decomposition.
  154. chenopodium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chenopodium (ken-o-po'-de-um) [xV. a goose; TMiof. a little foot]. American wormseed; the fruit of C. ambrosioides. or anlhelminticum, a plant native to the United States, with properties due to a volatile oil, which is the only preparation used. It is an efficient anthelmintic apainst the roundworm. c., oil of (nleitm chenopodii, U. S. P.). Dose 5-15 min. (0.32-1.0 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chenopodium (ke-no-po'dl-um) [G. chin, goose, + fous(fod-), foot.] The dried ripe fruit of Chenopodium ambrosioides, American wormseed, Mexican tea, Jesuit tea; anthelmintic in dose of gr. 10 (1.3), or of 3 ounces (60.0) of a decoction of an ounce to the pint.
  155. cherophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cherophobia (ke-ro-fo'be-ah) [Gr. xalpttv to rejoice + fear]. Morbid dislike or fear of gaiety.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cherophobia (kc-ro-fo'bc-ah) [Gr. \a.ipuv to rejoice + iptjfltn fear]. Morbid dislike or fear of gaiety.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cherophobia (ker-o-foTst-ah) [G. chairo, I rejoice, + fhobos, fear.] An aversion to and morbid fear of gaiety.
  156. chicken-pox - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chicken-pox (chik'en-poks). See varicella.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chicken-pox (chik'en-poks). See varicella.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chick'en-pox. Varicella; an acute contagious disease, occurring usually in children only, marked by a sparse eruption of papules, becoming vesicles and then pustules, like that of smallpox though less severe; there are usually also mild constitutional symptoms. The incubation period is about 14 to 17 days.
  157. chimaphila - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chimaphila (ki-maf-il-ah) (x«iia. winter; #Xoi. loving]. Pipsissewa; prince's-pine; the leaves of C. umbeHoto, an evergreen found in the United States, an astringent tonic and excellent diuretic. The bruised leaves are used as a rubefacient. It is valuable in dropsy, in renal disease, and in affections of the urinary passages, c., decoction of (deaxlum ckimapUla, B. P.). Dose 1-3 oz. (3O- Cc.). e., flaideitract of yiuidtxtractum chimaphila, U. S. P.). Dose \-i dr. (2-8 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chimaphila (kim-af'e-lah) [G. cheima. winter, + philos, loving.] (N.F.) The dried leaves of Chimaphila umbellata, pipsissewa, Prince's pine; diuretic and alterative, in doses of gr. 15—30 (1.0-2.0).
  158. chinosol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chinosol (kin'-o-sot). See quinosol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chinosol (ki'no-sol). A yellow powder. C,H,,N.OSOjK + H,O; oxyquinolin potassium sulphonate: antiseptic, antipyretic, astringent, and styptic. It is used externally in solutions of from i: 5000 to i: 500; internally, dose, 1-5 gr. (0.06-0.3 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chinosol (kin'o-sol). Quinosol, oxychinolin potassium sulphate, a yellow crystalline powder; antiseptic and disinfectant in solutions of 1-2000 to i-ioo, and employed in 5 per cent, solution to preserve anatomical specimens.
  159. chiralgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chiralgia (ki-ral'-je-ah). See chiragra.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chiralgia (ki-ral'je-ah). Same as ckiragra.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chiral'gia (ki-ral'jl-ah) [G. cheir, hand. + algos, pain]. Pain, especially nontraumatic or neuralgic pain, in the hand.
  160. chirognomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chirognomy (ki-rog'no-me) [Gr. x*ip hand + yv&nwv judge]. The study of the hand as a guide to character.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chirognomy (ki-rog'nb-mi) [G. ckeir, hand, + gndmSn, a judge.] Physiognomy of the hand, study of the hand as an index of character.
  161. chlamydospore - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chlamydospore (klam'-id-o-spor) [xXo*Ci. mantle; v-wbpa, seed]. In biology, applied to a spore having its own protective envelope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chlamydospore (klam'id-o-spor) [Gr. x^«Mfo cloak -f- spore], 1. The reproductive organ of certain fungi; so named because of its being inclosed by two envelops. 2. A spore that is covered.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chlamydospore (klam'id-o-spor) [Gr. \\.inln cloak 4- sport], i. The reproductive organ of certain fungi; so named because of its being inclosed by two envelops. 2. A spore that is covered.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chlam'ydospore [G. chlamys(chlamyd-), cloak.] A variety of the arthrospore, which becomes encysted in a chitin-like envelope, composed of cytoplasm, and containing food material.
  162. chloasma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloasma (klo-az'-mah) [xXodfto'. to be pale green]. A deposit of pigment in the skin, occurring in patches of various sizes and shapes, and of a yellow, brown, or black color. Syn., discoloration*; mtlanoderma; melasma. c. hepaticum, liver-spots;
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chloasma (klo-az'mah) [Gr. x^°of«" to he green]. A cutaneous discoloration occurring in yellowish-brown patches and spots. The term is applied vaguely to various pigmentary skin discolorations. C. bronzi mini, bronze colored pigmentation of the face, neck, and chest from constant exposure to the sun in the tropics. Called also tropical mask- C cachectico'rum, chloasma due to cachectic conditions of tuberculosis, syphilis, malaria, etc. c. hepat'icum, the so-called liver-spot; a skin discoloration following dyspepsia. c. phthisico rum, brown patches on the cheeks and forehead of tuberculous patients, symptomatic c, chloasma symptomatic of some other disease, as syphilis, c. uterinum, a skin discoloration which occurs during gestation.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chloasma (klo-az'mah). Patches of excessive pigmentation of the skin. The condition is (a) idiopathic, when due to external agencies as exposure to heat, sunlight, x-rays, irritating drugs, or mechanical irritation or (b) symptomatic, when it occurs in the course of certain diseases, as Addison's disease, secondary syphilis, utero-ovarian disease, malaria, and cancer. c. uterinum. C. due to pregnancy or to disease of the genital apparatus in women. [Gr., chloacein, to be green.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chloasma (klo-az'mah) [G. chloaso, I become green.] The occurrence of light brown patches of irregular shape and size on the skin of the face and elsewhere; the pigmented patches are also called moth patches and liver spots, c. brona'num, tropical mask, a bronze colored pigmentation occurring in gradually increasing areas on the face, neck, and chest in persons exposed continuously to the tropical sun. c. phthis'icum, pigmentation of the chest in pulmonary tuberculosis, c. uteri'num, c. of the face occurring in pregnancy and in diseases of the uterus or ovaries, idiopath'ic c., c. occurring from external irritation, such as heat (c. calor'tcum), scratching (c. traumaficvm), local poisoning (c. tox'icum), etc. symptomatic c., c. occurring in the subjects of various systemic affections, such as syphilis or malaria.
  163. chloralamide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloralamide (klo-ral'-am-id). See chloral fort amide.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chloralam'ide. Chloral-ammonia. Incorrectly applied to chloralformamide.
  164. chloralum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloralum (kla'-ral-um). i. Chloral. -•. Crude aluminum chloride mixed with various sodium and alaum salts; a disinfectant, c. hydra turn, the or&ciil name of chloral hydrate in the U. S. P.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chloralum (klo-ral'um). A commercial name for various disinfectant mixtures of aluminum chlorid. c. hydra'tum, the U. S. P. name for chloral.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloralum (klo-ral'um). A commercial name for various disinfectant mixtures of aluminum chlorid. c. hydra'tum, the U. S. P. name for chloral.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chlora'lum. Chloral, c. hydra'tum (U.S.), chloral hydras (Br.), trichlorethylidene glycol, CC1,.CH(OH),; occurs in large rhombic crystals or in white crystalline masses; hypnotic and analgesic in doses of gr. 5-30 (o. 3-2. o).
  165. chlorazol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chlorazol (klrf-rat-alt. A highly toxic, oily liquid, obtained from albumin, glutin, or dried muscle by action of strong nitric and hydrochloric acids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chlorazol (klo'ra-zol). A highly poisonous, oily
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chlorazol (klo'ra-zol). A highly poisonous, oily liquid obtained by treating albumin, glutin, or dried muscle with nitric and hydrochloric acids.
  166. chloretone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chloretone (klo're-KSn) [chloroform + acetone A white, crystalline compound, CCl,(CHj)-C.Or having a camphoraceous odor, formed when caust potash is added to equal weights of acetone an chloroform. It is sparingly soluble in water, bi very soluble in chloroform, alcohol, and elhe It is a local anesthetic and internally a hypnoti antiseptic, and antinauseant: used in seasicknes Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.333-1.333 gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloretone (klo're-t6n) [chloroform + acetone]. A white, crystalline compound, CCWCHJjC.OH, having a camphoraceous odor, formed when caustic potash is added to equal weights of'acetone and chloroform. It is sparingly soluble in water, but very soluble in chloroform, alcohol. an* *tnerIt is a local anesthetic and internally a hypnotic, antiseptic, and antinauscant: used in seasickness. Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.333-1.333 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chloretone (klo're-ton). Acetone-chloroform, tertiary trichlorbutyl-alcohol, C^rChO, -occurring in white crystals of camphor-like odor and taste; hypnotic, sedative, and local anesthetic in doses of gr. 5-20 (0.3-1.3).
  167. chlorin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chlorin (klo'rin) [L. chlo'rum or chlori'num, fit Gr. \\upm green], A yellowish-green, gasec element, of suffocating odor; symbol, CI; aton weight, 35.4; specific gravity, 2.45. It is disi fectant, decolorant, and an irritant poison, is used for disinfecting, fumigating, and bleat ing, cither in an aqueous solution or in the foi of chlorinated lime. c.-water [L. a'qua chlo'i water charged with chlorin: antiseptic and deal ing. Dose, 10-20 min. (0.666-1.333 c.c).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chlorin (klo'rin). A non-metallic element, discovered by Scheele in 1774. It is a greenish yellow transparent gas, having an intensely irritant, disagreeable, suffocating odor. It is heavier than air, soluble in about one-half its volume of water. Many compounds containing c. are known. Symbol Cl. Atomic weight 35.46. Free c. is available as c. water, as chlorinated lime, and in the form of a solution of hypochlorites. List of poisons and their antidotes, see in appendix, page oooo. c. water. A saturated solution of chlorin in water. [Gr., chloros. green.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chlorin (klo'rin) 11.. cUo'rum or chlori'num, from Gr. Y.\u'(">v green], A yellowish-green, gaseous element, of suffocating odor; symbol, Cl; atomic weight, 35.4; specific gravity, 2.45. It is disinfectant, decolorant, and an irritant poison. It is used for disinfecting, fumigating, and bleaching, either in an aqueous solution or in the form of chlorinated lime. c.-water [L. a'quo cUo'ri\, water charged with chlorin: antiseptic and cleansing. Dose, 10-20 min. (0.666-1.333 ex.).
  168. chloroma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloroma (Ho-ro'-maK) [x*"P&, green; tua, a tumor: pi., chloromata], "Green cancer"; a rare variety of sarcoma, of a greenish tint, usually seated upon the periosteum of the bongs of the head.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloroma (klo-ro'mah) [Gr. xXupfc green + -u/jo tumor). A disease marked by the formation of greenish growths on the periosteum of the bones •of the face and skull, and attended by a blood-picfire closely resembling leukemia. Called also chlorosa'c&ma, chloroleukttnia, and green cancer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chloro'ma [G. chloros, green, + -onto..'] A condition marked by the occurrence of multiple growths, often of a greenish or greenish yellow color, on the periosteum of the bones of the face or skull and occasionally on the vertebrae, associated with the presence in the blood of numbers of lymphocytes or myeloblasts; green cancer, chlorosarcoma.
  169. chlorophane - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chlorophane (klo'-ro-fan) \xKupbt, green; ^afpeip. to show], A yellowish-green chromophane. See chromophane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chlorophane (klo'ro-fan) [Gr. , Awpoj green + ifaivnv to .how]. A greenish-yellow chromophane or pigrr ent obtainable from the retina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chlorophane (klo'ro-fan) [G. chloros, greenish yellow, + phaitto, I show.] A greenish yellow pigment in the retina.
  170. chloroquinone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloroquinone (Ho-ro-fewi'w'-fin) Any chlorine substitution-compound of quinone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloroquinone (klo-ro-kwin'Sn). Any one of a series of compounds formed by the action of chlorin on quinone.
  171. choledoch - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choledoch (kol'-e-dok) [chokdochus]. i. Conducting bile. 2. A bile-duct. 3. The common bileduct.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choledoch (ko'le-dok). Choledochus. c. duct, ductus choledochus.
  172. choledochus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choledochus (kol-ed'-o^us) [xoXij, bile; 64x e0 u, to receive]. Receiving or holding bilr. c., ductus communis, the common excretory duct of the liver and gall-bladder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choledochus (ko-led'o-kus) [Gr. •,..Arj bile + otxvSai to receive]. The ductus choledochus, or common bile-duct.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choledochus (ko-led'o-kus) [G. chole, bile, + dochos, containing; dechomai, I receive.] The common bile-duct, ductus* choledochus.
  173. choleriform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choleriform (kol-er'-if-orm) \cholera; forma, form]. Resembling or appearing like cholera.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choleriform (ko-Ier'if-orm) [cholera + L. Jor'ma form]. Resembling cholera.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choleriform (kol'er-I-form) [L. forma, form.] Resembling cholera, choleroid.
  174. choleroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choleroid (kol'-er-oid) [chnlera, tlSot. like]. Resembling cholera; choleriform.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choleroid (kol'er-oid). Like cholera.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choleroid (kol'er-oyd) [G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling cholera, choleriform.
  175. cholerophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cholerophobia (kol-er-ofo'-be-ah) [cholera; t&x, fear]. Morbid dread of cholera.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cholerophobia (kol-er-o-fo'be-ah) [cholera + Gr. ifiBos fear]. An abnormal dread of cholera.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cholerophobia (kol"er-o-fo'bc-ah). An exaggerated dread of cholera. [Gr., cholera, cholera,, + phobos, fear.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cholerophobia (kol-er-o-fo'bl-ah) [G. phobos, fever.] A morbid fear of acquiring cholera.
  176. cholesterin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cholesterin (kol-es'-ler-in) [xo\4. bile; .-;.',-,.. fat). CirHuOH. A monatomic alcohol, a constituent of bile, gall stones, nervous tissuc«egg yolk, and blood, and sometimes found in foci of fatty degeneration. It is a glistening, white, crystalline substance, soapy to the touch, crystallizing in fine needles and i hombic plates. It is insoluble in water, soluble in hot alcohol, ether, or chloroform. It is held in solution in the bile by the bile salts; it is levorotatory. The power of immunizing against and neutralizing snakevenom is attributed to it. c., tests for. See Lieberrnann-Burchard. Obcrmueller, Salkowski. Schif, Schullse.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cholesterin (ko-les'ter-in) [Gr. voXiJ bile + areptSt solid]. A fat-like, pearly substance, a monatomic alcohol, Cmh^o, found in gall-stones, bile, and nerve substance. It is said to have the power of neutralizing snake-venoms, and of immunizing against them.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cholesterin (ko-les'ter-in). Cholesterol, c. cleft, see under cleft.
  177. choluria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choluria (kol-u'-re-ah) [chal-; otpor, urine]. The presence of bile, bile-salts, or bile-pigments in tie urine. Also, the greenish coloration of the urine.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      choluria (ko-lu're-ah). The presence of
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choluria (k6-lu'rl-ah) [G. chole, bile, + ouron, urine.] The presence of bile salts in the urine.
  178. chondral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chondral (kon'dral). Cartilaginous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondral (kon'dral) [G. chondros, cartilage.] Relating to cartilage.
  179. chondrify - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondrify (kon'-drif-i) [ehondro-; fieri. to become]. To convert into cartilage: to become cartilaginous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondrify (kon'drl-fi). To become cartilaginous.
  180. chondrigen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondrigen (kon'-drii-tn) [chondrin; ttw&f. to produce). That material of the hyaline cartilage ithich on boiling with water becomes chondrin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondrigen (kon'drJ-jen). Chondrogen, the special basal substance of cartilage which is converted into chondrin by boiling.
  181. chondritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondritis (kon-dri'-tis) [ehondro-; Itu, Inflammation], Inflammation of a cartilage.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chondritis (kon-dri'tis). Inflammation of cartilage. [Gr., chondros, cartilage, -filis, inflammation.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondritis (kon-dri'(dre')tis). Inflammation of cartilage.
  182. chondrocranium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondrocranium (kon-dro-kra'-nc-um) [ehondro-; crtmium], The cartilaginous cranium, as of the embryo.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chondrocranium (kon-dro-kra'ne-um) [Gr. x°"~ dpos cartilage + Kpavlov head]. The cartilaginous cranial structure of the embryo.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondrocranium (kon-dro-kra'nl-um) [G. chondros, cartilage, + kranion, skull.] A cartilaginous skull; the embryonic skull before ossification.
  183. chondroglossus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondroglossus (kon-dro-gtos'-us). See rnxscUs. table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chondroglossus (kon-dro-glos'us). See muscles, table of.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chondroglossus (kon-dro-glos'sus). See tabic of muscles, under muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondroglossus (kon-dro-glos'us) [G. chondros, cartilage, + gldssa, tongue.] See musculus chondroglossus.
  184. chondroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondroid (kon'-droid) [ehondro-; Mot, form]. Resembling cartilage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chondroid (kon'droid) [Gr. \bvbpm cartilage -|e!Jot form). 1. Resembling cartilage. 1. Same as amyloid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chondroid (kon'droid) [Gr. v'" "/•»> cartilage + ttiot form], i. Resembling cartilage. 2. Same as amyloid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondroid (kon'droyd) [G. chondros, cartilage, + eidos, resemblance.] i. Resembling cartilage, a. Cartilaginous.
  185. chondrology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondrology (kon-drol'-o-je) [ehondro-; Xoyoi, science]. The science of cartilages.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chondrology (kon-droKo-je) [Gr. Yovopos cartilage + \oym discourse]. The sum of knowledge in retard to the cartilages.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chondrology (kon-dn>ro-je) [Gr. ,.>,>,.,., cartilage + \6yot discourse). The sum of knowledge in regard to the cartilages.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondrology (kon-drol'o-jl) [G. chondros, cartilage + -logia.] Science in relation to cartilage and the cartilages.
  186. chondromalacia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chondromalacia (kon-dro-mal-a'-se-ah) [ehondro-; iia\a*la, softening]. Softening of a cartilage, c. auris. Same as httmatoma auris.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chondromalacia (kon"dro-mal-a'se-ah) [Gr. xoripoi cartilage + ua\axLa softness]. Preternatural softness of the cartilages. C. fOBta'lis, a condition in which the limbs of the fetus are soft and pliable.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chondromalacia (kon"dro-mal-a'se-ah). Softness or softening of the cartilages. [Gr., chondros, cartilage, + maiakiz, softness.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chondromalacia (kon"dro-mal-a'se-ah) [Gr. xMpm cartilage + pa\iLitlo. softness]. Preternatural softness of the cartilages, c. fosta lis, a condition in which the limbs of the fetus are soft and pliable.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chondromalacia (kon-dro-mal-a'sl-ah) [G. chondros, cartilage, + malakia, softness.] Softening of any cartilage, c. fetalis, an intrauterine form of chondrodystrophy in which the fetus is bora dead with soft pliable limbs.
  187. choreic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choreic (ko-re'-ik) [chorea]. Relating to, of the nature of, or affected with chorea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choreic (ko-re'ik). Relating to or of the nature of chorea.
  188. choreoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choreoid (ko'-re-oid) [x°f»'a, dancing; <Uoi, like]. Pertaining or similar to chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choreoid (ko're-oid). Resembling chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choreoid (ko're-oid). Resembling chorea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choreoid (ko're-oyd) [G. eidos, resemblance.] Choreiform, resembling chorea.
  189. choreomania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choreomania (ko"re-o-ma'ne-ah) [Gr. xop«fa dance + fjavia madness]. Dancing mama, or epidemic chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choreomania (ko"re-0rma'ne-ah) [Gr. -xpptla dance + parla madness]. Dancing mania, or epidemic chorea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choreomania (ko-re-o-ma'nl-ah). Epidemic chorea, choromania, the dancing mania of the middle ages.
  190. chorial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chorial (ko'-re-af) [x&pto*, skin]. Chorionic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chorial (ko're-al). Of or relating to the chorion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chorial (ko're-al). Of or relating to the chorion.
  191. choriocarcinoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choriocarcinoma (ko"re-o-kar-sin-o'mah). Carcinoma developed from the chorionic epithelium. See syncytioma malignum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choriocarcinoma (ko"re-o-kar-sin-o'mah). Carcinoma developed from the chorionic epithelium. See syncytioma malignum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choriocarcinoma (ko"rl-o-kar-sl-no'mah). Chorioma malignum.
  192. chorioid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chorioid (ko'-re-oid}. See choroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chorioid (ko're-oid). The more correct form of the word choroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chorioid (ko're-oid). The more correct form of the word choroid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chorioid (ko-rl-oyd). Choroid. i. Resembling-is) Ichromalo-; X6»«. a loosing], i. Flemming's term for the breakingdown of the nucleus at the death of the cell. Syn., karyolysis. i. The disintegration and disappearance of the Nissl granules from nerve-cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromatolysis (kro-ma-tol'i-sis) [chromatin + G. lysis, solution.] i. Destruction of the chromatin, or at least loss of its affinity for the basic dyes, in cloudy swelling and other forms of cellular degeneration; caryolysis, nuclear solution, hypochromatosis. 2. Lysis of the body of a bacterial or other cell, leaving the empty cell membrane, chro'matolysm. Atrophy or shrinkage of Niessl's
  193. chromicize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromicize (kro'-mis-tz). To impregnate with chromic acid or a chromium salt.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chromicize (kro'mis-Iz). To treat with a chromium compound.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chro'micize. To mix with a chromium salt.
  194. chromidium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromidium (kro-mid'-e-um). Any one of the granules of nuclear substance found in the cytoplasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromidium (kro-midl-um) [G. chroma, color, + -idion, a diminutive termination.] i. The central chromatic structure of the blood-platelet. 2. See the plural, chromidia.
  195. chromometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromometer (kro-mom'-rt-ur}. See chromatometer (2).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromom'eter. Chromatometer.
  196. chromophobic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromophobic (kro'-mo-fo-bik) [chromo-; &>0ott fear]. Not stainable; not readily absorbing color. Cf. chromophilous.
  197. chylopoietic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chylopoietic (ki-lo-poi-et'-ik) [see chylopoiesis]. Making or forming chyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chylopoietic (ki"lo-poi-et'ik). Concerned in the formation of chyle.
  198. chylous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chylous (ki'-lus) [chyle]. Relating to or resembling chyle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      chylous (ki'lus). Pertaining to, of the nature of, resembling, or impregnated with, chyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chylous (ki'lus). Pertaining to, mingled with, or of the nature of, chyle.
  199. cibophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cibophobia (si-bo-fo'-be-ak) [cibus, food; t0oi, fear]. Morbid aversion to food.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cibophobia (si-bo-fo'be-ah) [L. ci'tum food -f Gr. v-6^os fear). Abnormal loathing of food.
  200. cicatricial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cicatricial (sik-ai-rish'-aft [cicatrix]. Pertaining to or of the nature of a cicatrix. c. deformities, abnormal contractions caused by cicatrices, c. tissue, a form of dense connective tissue seen in cicatrices.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cicatricial (sik-at-rish'al). Pertaining to or of the nature of a cicatriz.
  201. cicatrization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cicatrization (sik-at-rii-a'-shun) [cicatrix]. The process of healing of a wound.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cicatrization (sik"a-tri-za'shon). Tke formation of a cicatrix in the healicj of a wound.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cicatrization (sik"at-riz-a'shun). A healing process which leaves a scar or cicatrix.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cicatrization (s!-kat-ri-za'shun). i. The process of scar formation. 2. The healing of a wound otherwise than by first intention.
  202. cicutine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cicutine (sik'-u-len) [ciaita. hemlock), i. An alkaloid obtained from Cicuta virosa. 2. The same as coniine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cic'utine. A volatile alkaloid, resembling or identical with coniine, present in water-hemlock, Cicuta virosa.
  203. cimbia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cimbia («'m'-i>VaA) [L.]. The white band
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cimbia (sim'be-ah) [L.]. A white band running across the ventral surface of the crus cerebri.
  204. cimicifuga - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cimicifuga (sim-is-if-u-gah) [cimex; fugare, to drive away]. Black snakeroot; black cohosh. The root of C. racemosa, ord. Ranunculacea, A stomachic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, expectorant, and diuretic. Its action on the heart Is similar to that of digitalis. It has been used in cardiac diseases, functional impotence, chorea, and ovarian neuralgia. c., extract of (extractum cimicifuta, U. S. P.). Dose 4 gr. (0.25 Gni. i. c., Huidextract of (fluidextraflum cimicifitga, U. S. P.). Dose 5-30 min. (0.32-3.0 Cc.). c., liquid extract of (extractum cimicifuta liguidum, B. P.). Dose 3-30 min. (0.2-2.0 Cc.). c., tincture of (linctura cimicifuga. U. S. P.) (20 % strength). Dose 15 min.-i dr. (1-4 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cimicifuga (U. S.), cimicif'ugge rhizo'ma (Br.) (sim-I-sif'u-gah) [L. cimex(cimic-), bedbug, + fugare, to chase.] The dried rhizome and roots of Cimifijuga racemosa, Acl&a racemosa, black snakeroot, black cohosh, bugwort, an herb of eastern and central United States and Canada; alterative, emmenagogue, antispasmodic, antirheumatic in doses of gr. 10-15 (0.6-1.0).
  205. cimicifugin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cimicifugin (sim-is-iFu-jin). A resinous concentration from cimicifuga: antispasmodic, narcotic, diaphoretic. Dose, 1-3 gr. (0.06-0.10 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cimicifugin (sim-l-sif'u-jin). Macrotih, a yellowish brown resinoid body, the active principle of cimicifuga; tonic and antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1-6 (0.06-0.4).
  206. cinchonism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cinchonism (sin'ko-niztn). The morbid or injurious effect of the injudicious use of cinchona bark or its alkaloids. It is attended by headache, tinnitus aurium, deafness, and symptoms of cerebral congestion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cinchonism (sin'kon-izm). Poisoning by cinchona or its alkaloids, marked by tinnitus annum headache, and deafness.
  207. cinchonize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cinchonize (sin'-ko-nlz) [cinchona]. To bring under the influence of cinchona or its alkaloids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cinchonize (sin'ko-niz). To bring under the influence of cinchona or of any of its alkaloids.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cinchonize (sin'ko-niz). To bring profoundly under the influence of cinchona or any of its alkaloids, especially quinine.
  208. cionotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cionotome (si-on'-o-t6m) [utan, the uvula; rop4. a cutting]. An instrument for cutting off the uvula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cionotome (si'on-o-tom) [G. kion, uvula, + tomi, cutting.] An instrument for cutting off part or all of the uvula.
  209. cionotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cionotomy (si-o-not'o-me) [Gr. nluv uvula + riftmv to cut]. The surgical removal of a part of the uvula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cionot'omy. Cutting off a part of the uvula.
  210. circuminsular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      circuminsular (sir-kitm-in'-su-lar) [circum-; insuUi. island]. Surrounding the island of Keil.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      circuminsular (scr-kum-in'su-lar) [L. cir'cum around + in'sula island]. Surrounding, situated, or occurring about the island of Reil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      circumin'sular. Situated around the island of Reil.
  211. circumscriptus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      circumscriptus (ser-kum-skrip'tus). Circumscribed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      circumscriptus (sur-kum-skrip'tus) [L. circum, around, + scribere, to write.] Circumscribed.
  212. cirsocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cirsocele (ser'so-sel) [Gr. Kipaoi varix + irijXij tumor]. The same as taricocde.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cirsocele (sur'so-sel) [G. kirsos, varix, + kite, tumor.] Varicocele, a dilatation of the veins of the spermatic cord, marked by a boggy swelling, a dragging weight, and slight pain.
  213. cirsoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cirsoid (scr'soid) [Gr. n/xrfc varix]. Resembling a varix.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cirsoid (sur'soyd) [G. kirsos, varix, + eidos, appearance.] Varicose, resembling a varix. c. an'eurysm, dilatation and tortuosity of an artery resembling varices in a vein.
  214. cladode - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cladode (klad'-Oo) K>..TM.,. a branch; Mat, form]. In biology, branch-like.
  215. clasmatocyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clasmatocyte (klos-mal'-o-slt) [xXdffpa, fragment; jcftrof, cell]. A form of very large connective-tissue corpuscles that tend to break up into granules or pieces. '
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clasmatocyte (klaz-mat'o-sit) [Gr. ..v'm.in piece broken off + /ctrot cell). A large connective-tissue cell which shows a tendency to divide into pieces.
  216. clavicula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clavicula (klav-ik'-i-loh). The clavicle, c. capitis. the projection formed by the pterygoid and entopterygoid bones on the pleurapophysis of the heraal arch of the nasal vertebra
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clavic'ula [L. dim. of clavis, key.] Clavicle.
  217. cleft-palate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleft-palate (kleft-pal'at). Congenital fissure of iii, palate and roof of the mouth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cleft-palate. A congenital fissure in the roof of the mouth, due to failure of the palate bones to unite; usually associated with harelip, repair of c.-p., staphyloplasty, staphylorrhaphy, uranoplasty uranorrhaphy.
  218. cleidotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cleidotomy (kli-dot'-p-me) [cleido-; rkiana, to cut]. The operation of dividing the clavicles in cases of < 1 mie : 1 1 1 1 abor due to the broad shoulders of the child.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleidotomy (kli-dot'o-mc) [Gr. xXeis clavicle + Tom'? cut]. The operation of dividing the clavicle of the child in difficult labor, in order to permit of the passage of the shoulders.
  219. cleithrophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleithrophobia (kll-thro-fo'be-ah). Same as claustrophobia.
  220. cleptophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cleptophobia (klep-to-fo'-be-ah). See kleptophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleptophobia (klep-to-fo'be-ah). See klcptophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cleptopho'bia [G. klepto, I steal, + phobos, fear.] A morbid dread of becoming a thief or a cleptomaniac.
  221. climacter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      climacter (kli-mnk'-tur). See climacteric. .
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      climac'ter [G. klimakter,- the round c,f a" ladder.] Climacteric(i).
  222. climatotherapy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      climatotherapy (kli-mat-o-ther'-a-pe) [a, clime; »«p«T€;a, a waiting on). The employment of climatic measures in the treatment of disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      climatotherapy (kli"mat-o-ther'ap-e) [climate + Gr. flipmttin treatment]. The treatment of disease by means of a favorable climate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      climatother'apy [G. klima(klimat-), climate, + therapeia, treatment.] The treatment of disease by a sojourn in a region having a certain climate.
  223. clinology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clinology (kli-nol'o-je) [Gr. < ,W. «• decline + Xo7oj discourse). The science of the decline or retrogression of an animal organism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clinology (kli-nol'o-jl) [G. klino, I decline, + -logia. The part of science which has to deal with the retrograde changes in living organisms following the period of maturity.
  224. clithrophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clithrophobia (klith-ro-pho'W-ah) [G. kleithron.a. bolt, + phobos, fear.] Morbid dread of being locked in.
  225. clitoridotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clitoridotomy (kli-tor-id-otVme) [clitoris + Gr. jn/.nj a cut]. Female circumcision.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clitoridotomy (klit-or-I-dot'o-ml) [G. kleiloris(kleitorid-), clitoris, + tome, a cutting.] Circumcision in the female.
  226. clonism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clo'nism. A long continued state of clonic spasms.
  227. clove-hitch - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clove-hitch. See under knot. clownism (klown'izm). The hysteric performance
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clove-hitch. A knot or loop used in making temporary traction on a limb; see cut under knot.
  228. clunes - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clunes (klu'->tiz) [pi. of .::,•:,. buttock]. The buttocks, nates.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clu'nes [pi. of L. clunis, buttock.] Nates, buttocks.
  229. clysma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clysma (Mis'-majt). See clyster.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clys'ma [G. klysma, a drenching.] An enema or clyster.
  230. clysterize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clys'terize. To administer a rectal injection.
  231. cnemial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cnemial (nt'-mc-al} [o^mtj, the leg]. Relating to the tibia or lee; crural.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cnemial (ne'me-al). Pertaining to the shin. cnemis (ne'mis) [Gr. ..; WM The lower leg, shin,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cnemial (ne'ml-al) [G. knetne, leg.] Relating to the leg, especially to the shin.
  232. cnicin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cnicin (nl'-iin) [»H)«w, a plant of the thistle kind), GiHtfOu. A crystalline bitter substance found In GiiViis btnedictus. Blessed thistle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cnicin (ni'sin). The bitter principle of carduus, Cnicus benedictus; dose, gr. 5 (o. 3).
  233. co-enzyme - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      co-enzyme (£o-en'-s!m). A substance whose presence is essential for the due activity of a certain enzyme.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      co-enzyme (ko-en'zim). Activator(i).
  234. coal-tar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coal-tar (kol'-tar). A by-product in the manufacture of illuminating gas; it is a black, viscid fluid, of a characteristic and disagreeable odor. The specific gravity ranges from i.io to 1.20. Its composition is extremely complex, and its principal constituents are separated, one from the other, by means of fractional distillation. Among the principal products manufactured from coal-tar are anthracene, benzol, naphtha, cieosote, phenol, pitch, etc. From the basic oil of coal-tar are manufactured the anilin or coal-tar colors or dyes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coal-tar. A black viscid liquid formed during the manufacture of illuminating gas from coal. It is a mixture of many hydrocarbons, and is the source of a great variety of substances, such as the aniline dyes, and a number of the so-called synthetic drugs, c.-t. rem'edies, drugs manufactured synthetically from c.-t. or its derivatives, such as acetanilide, antipyrine, etc.
  235. cocain - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cocain. It is official in the Swiss pharmacopeia. eucaloids (eu'kal-oyds). A trade name for
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cocain (ko'ka-in). A crystalline alkaloid, r,.l I .,M>,. from coca leaves. It is a local anesthetic, narcotic, and mydriatic. Its hydrochlorid and many others of its compounds are employed in medicine and surgery. The salts are used toproduce local anesthesia and local anemia in painful conditions and for minor operations; also as mydriatics, and internally in gastric irritability and nausea. Dose, J-2 gr. (0.008-0.133 gm.); of the hydrochlorid, J-i gr. (0.011-0.066 gm.); of the phenate, A-$ gr. (0.0054-0.011 gm.). c. aluminum citrate, a crystalline salt: an astringent and local anesthetic, c. aluminum sulphate, a crystalline double salt: an astringent and local anesthetic. C. borate, employed in eye-washes and in hypodermic injections: it isregarded as one of the most serviceable of the cocain salts, c. cantharidate, a white powder: recommended for hypodermic use in nasal catarrh and in tuberculosis of the larynx. C. carbolate, a viscid, yellowish mass: used as a local anesthetic, analgesic, etc., in rheumatism and in catarrhal inflammations. Dose, ,\ ' gr. (0.005-0.011 gm.); locally, in 1-3 per cent, solution, c. lactate is recommended for injection into the bladder in cystitis. Dose, 15 gr. (i gm.). c. nitrate is used in the treatment of gonorrhea! and bladder troubles, c. saccharate, a salt in moist, crystalline plates: used principally in throat and mouth operations, c. salicylate, a salt in thick flakes: used hypodennically for asthma. Dose, 5 gr. (0.333 l'»'-j C- stearate, a compound used like cocain oleate in suppositories and ointments.
  236. cocainism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cocainism (ko-ka'-in-izm) [cocaine]. The cocainehabit.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cocainism (koTcah-in-izm). The habitual use of cocaine as an intoxicant.
  237. cocainist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cocainist (kn-kn'-in-isl). One addicted to habitual use of cocaine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cocainist (koTcah-6n-ist). One suffering from cocaine addiction.
  238. cocainize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cocainize (ko-ka'-in-lz). To bring under the Influence of cocaine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cocainize (ko-ka'in-iz). To put under the influence of cocain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cocainize (ko'kah-en-Iz). To render anesthetic by means of cocaine.
  239. coccal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coccal (kak'-al) [coccus]. Relating to cocci.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coc'cal. Relating to cocci.
  240. coccidiosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coccidiosis (kok-sid-e-o'-sis) [coccidium; roar*, disease]. The group of symptoms produced by the presence of coccidia in the body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coccidiosis (kok-sid-e-o'sis). The occurrence in the liver, usually of the rabbit, of rounded whitish nodules of variable size situated along the smaller bile-ducts; these consist of hypertrophy of the epithelium of the ducts due to inclusions of coccidia.
  241. coccoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coccoid (kok'oid). Resembling a coccus; globose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coccoid (kok'oyd) [coccus + G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a coccus, especially a micrococcus.
  242. coccydynia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coccydynia (kok-se-din'-e-aK). See coccytodynia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coccydyn'ia. Coccygodynia.
  243. coccygeus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coccygeus (kok-sij'-e-us) [coccyx]. One of the pelvic muscles. See under muscle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      coccygeus (kok-sij'e-us). See table «/ muscles, under muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coccygeus (kok-sl-je'us). See under musculia.
  244. cochleare - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cochleare (kok-le-ah're). A spoon; among various medical authors, a measure varying from yj dr. to J4 fl. oz. c. magnum. A tablespoon, holding about 16 c.c. c. minimum. A teaspoon, holding about 5 c.c. [Gr., kochliarion.] Cochlearla (kok-le-ah're-ah). A genus of cruciferous plants. C. armoracla. The horse radish. C. pfllclmilis. Common scurvy grass. It is stimulant, aperient, and diuretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cochleare (kok-le-a're). L. for" spoon " or " spoonful." C. am'plum, "large spoon"; a tablespoonful. C. mag'num, tablespoon or tablespoonful: abbreviated to cochl. mag. c. medium, dessertspoon or dessertspoonful; literally, middle-sized spoon: abbreviated to cochl. med. C. par vuru, a teaspoon
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cochleare (kok-le-a're) [L.] A spoon, c. nm plum, c. mag'num, large spoon, tablespoon, c. me'dium, medium-sized spoon, dessertspoon, c. jmr'vum, small spoon, teaspoon.
  245. cochleate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cochleate (kok'-lc-tt) [cochleatus, spiral]. Spirally coiled, like a snail -shell.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cochleate (kok'le-at) [L. cochlea snail). Shaped like a snail shell: said of bacterial cultures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cochleate (kok'le-at) [L. cochlea, a snail.] Resembling more or less a snail-shell, noting the appearance of a form of plate culture; see cut under colony, i, A.
  246. codamine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      codamine (ko1-dam-in) [«M«a. poppy-head: «i«], C»H»NOt. A crystalline alkaloid of opium, isomeric with laudanine. When ferric chloride uadded to it, it assumes a deep-green color.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      co'damine. An alkaloid, C^l^NO,, derived from the mother liquor of morphine, isomeric with laudanine; occurring in hexagonal crystals.
  247. coitophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coitophobia (ko-it-o-fo'-bc-ah) [coitus; 6@TM. fear). Morbid dread of coitus from disgust or dyspareunia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coitophobia (ko"it-o-fo'be-ah) [coitus + Gr. <p60ot fear]. Morbid dread of coitus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coitophobia (ko-I-to-fo'bl-ah) [L. coitus, sexual intercourse, + G. phobos, fear.] An unreasoning apprehension or fear of the sexual act.
  248. coko - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coko (ko'ko). A Fijian disease resembling yaws.
  249. colchicum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colchicum (kol'-cKik-um) [roXxucir, colchicum). Meadow-saffron. The corm and seed of C. atttttmnale, the properties of which are due to an alkaloid, colchicine. It is an emetic, diuretic, diaphoretic, and drastic cathartic. It is valuable in acute gout and in some forms of rheumatism. Dose of the powdered corm (colchici cormus, U. S. P.) 2-8 gr. (0.13-0.52 Gm.)j of the pondered seeds (colchici semen, U. S. P.) 1-5 gr. (0.065-0.32 Gm.). c. conn, extract of (extractum colchici cormi, U. S. P.). Doee I gr. (0.065 Gm.). c., extract of, acetic (cxtractum aceticum colchici, B. P.). Dose }-2 gr. (0.032-0.13 Gm.). c. seed, fluidextract of (fluidextraetum colchici seminis, U. S. P.). Dose 3 mln. (0.2 Cc.). c. seed, tincture of (tinclura colchici seminis, U. S. P.), 10 % strength. Dose 10-30 min. (0.6-2.0 Cc.). c. seed, wine of (vinum colchici seminis, U. S. P.), 10 % in strength. Dose 10-30 min. (0.6-2.0 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colchicum (kol'chl-kum) (U.S.). Meadow saffron, the dried corm (col'chici cor'mus, U.S. and Br.), and the seed (col'chici se'men, U.S., col'chici sem'ina, Br.), of Colchicum autumnale, an herb of central and southern Europe; employed chiefly in the treatment of gout; dose of either corm or seeds, gr. 2-5 (0.13-0.3). The official preparations (U.S. and Br.) are a tincture made from the seeds, an extract from the conn, a wine from the seed (U.S.) or corm (Br.), and a fluidextract from the seed (U.S.).
  250. colcothar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colcothar (kol'-ko-thar). A crude sequioxide of iron; red oxide of iron; a tonic and hemostatic.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      colcothar (kol'ko-thar). Ferric
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colcothar (kol'ko-thar) [L.]. Ferric pcroxid, Fe,O,, red oxid of iron: tonic and styptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      col'cothar [L.] Red oxide of iron, ferri* oxidum rubrum.
  251. colibacillosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colibacillosis (ko-li-bas-il-o'-sis). The morbid condition due to infection with BaciUus coli.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colibacillosis (ko-li-bas-il-o'sis). Infection with the Bacillus colt.
  252. coliplication - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coliplication (ko-lip-lik-a'shun). Complication.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coliplication (ko-11-pli-ka'shun) [colon + plication.]
  253. collagenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      collagenic (kol-a-jen'-tk). Forming or producing collagen or gelatin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      collagenic (kol-a-jcn'ik). Forming or producing collagen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      collagen'ic. Producing gelatin, noting the tissues containing collagen.
  254. collidine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      collidine (koi'-id-in) [. ,.\.\f., glue], CiHuN. A ptomaine obtained from pancreas and gelatin allowed to putrefy together in water, c. aldehyde. See aldehyde, collidine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      collidine (kol'i-den). A ptomaine obtained from decomposing glue, occurring as an oily colorless liquid, of pleasant odor, but toxic, C«HuN.
  255. colliform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colliform (kol'-if-arm). A proprietary preparation containing formaldehyde and gelatin; used as a dressing for wounds.
  256. collin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      collin (koi'-tn) [*6\\a, glue]. Gelatin in soluble form.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coll'in. The diffusible form of gelatin, the type of the colloids(3).
  257. collodium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      collodium (kol-o'-dc-»m). See collodion.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      collodium (kol-lo'de-um). Of the U. S. Ph. and Br. Ph., a solution of dinilrocellulose (pyroxylin, gun-cotton) in ether and alcohol. It is used for sealing wounds, for causing dressings to adhere firmly to the skin, for protecting surfaces from the air, as a vehicle for various medicaments to be applied locally, and for the compression of parts to which it is applied by means of its subsequent contraction, caustic c. See c. cmtslicum. c. cantharidalc, c. cantharldatum. See c. cum cantharide [U. S. Ph.]. c. c. cscharoticum. Caustic or mercurial collodion; made by mixing cor
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      collodium (kol-o'de-um) [L.I. Collodion, c. cantharida'tum, cantharidal collodion: a vesicant preparation composed of flexible collodion, cantharides, and chloroform, c. flei'ile, flexible
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      collo'dium [G. holla, glue, + eidos, appearance.] (U.S. and Br.) Collodion, made by dissolving pyroxylin, or gun-cotton, 40, in ether 750, and alcohol 250; in the B.P. the proportions are i, 36, and 12, respectively; on evaporation it leaves a glossy contractile film; employed as a protective to cuts or as a vehicle for the local application of medicinal substances, c. cantharida'tum (U.S.), c. vesicans (Br.), cantharidal collodion,
  258. colloidin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colloidin (kat-oid'-in) [colloid], CtHiiNOs. A jelly, like substance obtained from colloid tissue.
  259. colocynthin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colocynthin (kol-o-sin'-tkin) [coiocynthis]. The bitter principle of color ynth. See coiocynthis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colocynthin (kol-o-sin'thin). A bitter, purgative glucosid, CwHwOtt, from colocynth. Dose, A~ | gr. (0.003-0x513 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colocyn'thin. A glucoside, C,,H,4O,,, from colocynth, occurs in the form of an amorphous yellow powder; has been employed hypodermically as a purgative in dose of gr. J (o.oi).
  260. colopexy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colopexy (kolo-pek-se). 'See colopexia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      co'lopexy. Colopexia.
  261. colophene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colophene (kol'o-fen). A colorless hydrocarbon, CjjHjj, derivable from turpentine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      col'ophene. An aromatic colorless oil obtained by the distillation of oil of turpentine with a strong acid.
  262. colotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      colot'omy. The operation of making an artificial anus by opening into the colon and securing the intestinal wound to lit external incision in the skin of the »bdomen or flank. The varieties art' abdominal, lilac, Inguinal, lateral lumbar, according to the situation of tl>opening. [Gr., kolon, colon, + temneif, to cut.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colot'omy [G. kolon, colon, + toml, incision.] Incision into the colon.
  263. colpeurynter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colpeurynter (kol-pu-rin'-ter) \*t>\-m. vagina; •tpvrur, to widen]. An inflatable bag or sac used for dilating the vagina.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      colpeurynter (Icol'pu-rin-ter). A rubber bag for distending the vagina. [Gr, Itolpos, vagina, + eurynein, to dilate.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colpeurynter (kol"pu-rin'ter) [G. kolpos, sinus (vagina), + etiryno, I dilate.] A bag introduced empty into the vagina and then filled with water, used for dilating the canal.
  264. colpitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colpitis (kol-pi'-lis) [«6Xrof, vagina; irtt, inflammation]. Inflammation of the vagina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colpitis (kol-pi'(pe')tis) [G. kolpos, sinus (vagina),
  265. colporrhaphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colporrhaphy (kol-por'-a-fe) [colpo-; Aa*4, a seam]. Suture of the vagina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      colporrhaphy (kol-por'ah-fe) [Gr. noXirot vagina + pav~i7 stitch]. The operation of denuding and suturing the vaginal wall for the purpose of narrowing the vagina.
  266. columbo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      columbo (kol-um'-bo). See calumba.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      columbo (ko-lum'bo). See calumba.
  267. commotio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      commotio (kom-o'-ski-o) [L.]. A concussion, commotion or shock, c. cerebri, concussion of the brain, c. retime, concussion or paralysis of the retina from a blow on or near the eye. It is characterized by sudden blindness, but there is little or no pphthalmoscopic evidence of any lesion. The sight is usually regained, and its loss is supposedly due to disturbance of the retinal elements, c. spinalis, railway spine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      commotio (kom-o'she-o) [L. "disturbance"]. A concussion; a violent shaking, or the shock which results from it. c. cer'ebri, concussion of the brain, c. ret'uue, impairment of vision following a blow on or near the eye. c. spina'lia, concussion of the spine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      commotio (kfi-mo'shyo) [L. commovere, to agitate.] Concussion, c. cer'ebri, concussion of the brain, a disturbance of the brain tissue caused by a blow on the head or a violent shaking, marked by nausea and vertigo followed by coma, with slow respiration and weak pulse, c. refine, a disturbance in retinal function, i.e. of vision, following a blow on the eyeball or a violent shaking of the head.
  268. communicans - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      communicans (kom-u'nik-anz) [L. " communicating"). A communicating nerve. See tatle of tunes, under nene.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      commu'nicans [L. communicating.] One of a number of nerves; see under nervus.
  269. compressorium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      compressorium (kom-t>rcs-of-re-urn) [compressor, a compress]. An instrument devised for making pressure on the cover-glass of a microscope-slide in order to favor separation of the elements of the specimen to be examined.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      compressorium (kom-pres-o're-um), pi. compresso'ria [L.]. A device for nuking graduated pressure upon objects under microscopic examination.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      compresso'rium. Compressor(a).
  270. conarial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conarial (ko-na'-re-al} [curipw, the pineal gland}. Relating to the conarium. c. vein. See rein.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conarial (ko-na're-al). Pertaining to the conarium.
  271. conarium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conarium (ko-na'-re-um) [cmpa/ho?; dim. of c&rot, a cone]. The pineal gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conarium (ko-na're-um) [L.; Gr. *a*Apio?l. The pineal body: so called from its conic shape.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cona'rium [G. konarion (dim. of konos. cone), the pineal body.] Epiphysis cerebri, pineal gland or body, corpus* pineale [BNA].
  272. concassation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      concassation (kon-kas-a'-shun) [concassatio; con, together: cassare or quassare, to shake to beat].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      concassation (kon-kas-a'shun). The act of breaking up roots or woods into small pieces in order that their active principles may be more easily extracted by solvents. „
  273. conchinine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conchinine (kon'-kin-ln). See quinidine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchinine (kong'kin-Sn). Conquinine, quinidine*.
  274. conchiolin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conchiolin (kong-ki'o-lin) [Gr. n6~rxi snelll- A substance, isomeric with ossein, from the shells of certain mollusks.
  275. conchitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conchitis (kong-ki'-tis) [xfrrxTj, a shell; Itu, inflammation]. Inflammation of the concha.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conchitis (kong-ki'tis). An inflammation of the concha.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchitis (kong-ki'(ke')tis). Inflammation of any concha.
  276. conchoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conchoscope (kong'-ko-skop) [concha; »«nr«I», to inspect]. A speculum and mirror for inspecting the nasal cavity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchoscope (kongTco-skOp) [L. concha + G. skopto, I view.] A form of nasal speculum.
  277. conchotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conchotome (kong'ko-t6m) [Gr. tbyxn 5.neU + roni a cutl- An instrument for the surgical removal of the turbinate bones.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchotome (kong'ko-tom) [L. concha, turbinated bone, + G. tome, incision.] A knife used in removing the whole or a part of a turbinated body
  278. condurangin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condurangin (knn~du-ranf-jin) [condurango]. A mixture of glucosides from condurango bark, occurring as an amorphous yellow powder of an aromatic bitter taste, soluble in water, alcohol, and chloroform. It is used as a stomachic and astringent in gastric cancer and chronic dyspepsia. Dose i1-. i gr. (0.006-0.016 Gm.) 3 times daily.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      condurangin (kon-du-rang'gin). Either of two poisonous glucosids from condurango.
  279. condylarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylarthrosis (kon-dil-ar-thro'-sis') [condyle; 608poi>t a joint). A form of diarthrosis wherein a condyle is set in a shallow and elliptic cavity and free and varied movement of the joint is possible; condylar articulation.
  280. condylectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylectomy (kon-dil-ek'-to-me) [condyle; A1-0/117, excision). Excision of a condyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      condylectomy (kon-dil-ek'to-me) [condyle + Gr. torofi^ excision]. Surgical removal of a condyle.
  281. condylomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylomatous (kon-dil-o'-mat-us). Of the nature of a condyloma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      condylo'matous. Relating to a condyloma.
  282. confectio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      confectio (kon-fek'-she-o) [L.; gen., confectionis]. Official name for any confection, q. c. c. Damocratis. See milhridale.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      confectio (kon-fek'she-o) [L.]. See confection. C. o'pii, confection of opium; prepared from opium, aromatic powder, and honey: narcotic. Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.325-1.3 gm.). c. ro'ste, confection of rose; prepared from red-rose petals, sugar, rose-water, and honey: used as a vehicle. c. scammo'nii, confection of scammony; prepared with aromatics and honey: purgative. Dose, 10-30 gr. (0.666-2 gm.). c. sen'nse, confection of senna; a preparation of senna, cassia fistula, tamarind, coriander oil, prune, and fig: laxative. Dose, 2 dr. (8 gm.). C. sul'phuris, confection of sulphur: a laxative. Dose, 1-2 dr. (4-8 gm.). c. terebin'thinn, a carminative and styptic preparation of oil of turpentine. Dose, 1-2 dr. (4-8 gm.).
  283. confertus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      confertus (kon-fer'-lus) [confercire, to press close together]. Pressed together, dense, crowded; applied to cutaneous eruptions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      confertus (kon-fur'tus) [L. conferre, to bring together.] Arranged closely together; confluent, coalescing.
  284. coniology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coniology (ko-ne-ol'o-jc) [Gr. rims dust -I- XA-yos treatise). The scientific study of dust, its influence, and effects.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coniology (kon-l-ol'o-jl) [G. konis, dust, + -logia.] The science which treats of dust and of its effects.
  285. coniosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coniosis (ko-ru-o'-sis). See koniosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coniosis (ko-ne-o'sis) [Gr. «A«s dust]. A diseased state caused by the inhalation of dust.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conio'sis [G. konis, dust.] Any disease or morbid condition caused by dust.
  286. conjunctivoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conjunctivoma (kon-junk-tiv-o'-mah) [conjunctiva; Omci, tumor]. A tumor consisting of conjunctiva! tissue; it occurs on the eyelid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conjunctivoma (kon-junk-tiv-o'mah). A tumor of the eyelid made up of conjunctiva! tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conjunctivo'ma. A homeoplastic tumor of the conjunctiva.
  287. connectivum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      connectivum (kon-nek-ti'-i-um) [L.]. A connective tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      connectivum (kon-ek-ti'vum) [L.]. The connective tissue.
  288. consilia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      consilia (kon-sil'e-ah). Letters published by physicians of the isth to i?th centuries, outlining the semciology and treatment of diseases under their observation.
  289. constringent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      constringent (kon-strin'-jent) [constringere, to constrict]. Same as astringent, q. v.
  290. contra-indicant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      contra-indicant (kon-trah-in'dik-ant). Rendering any particular line of treatment undesirable or improper.
  291. contrastimulant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      contrastimulant (kon-trah-stim'-u-lant) [contra, against; siimulare, to stimulate]. I. Counteracting the effect of a stimulus; depressing; sedative. 2. A sedative remedy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      contrastimulant (kon-trah-stim'u-lant) [L. con'tra against -i- stimulant]. i. Counteracting or opposing stimulation, i. A depressant medicine.
  292. contrastimulus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      contrastim'ulus. Contrastimulant(a).
  293. contrayerva - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      contrayerva (kon-trah-yer'vah) [Port.]. The root of /'•'•:.•'•:;•.• broiiHtntis: tonic, stimulant, and diaphoretic. Dose in powder, 30 gr. (2 gm.).
  294. contrectation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      contrectation (kon-trtk-ta'-shun) [contrectatio; contreclare, to touch), i. Digital examination; palpation; touch; manipulation, as in massage. 2. The impulse to approach and caress a person of the opposite sex (H. Ellis.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      contrectation (kon-trek-ta'shun) [L. conlrtcta're to handle]. The fondling of a person of the opposite sex; "spooning" (Moll).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      contrectation (kon-trek-ta'shun) [L. contrectare, to handle.] I. Sexual dalliance. 2. The impulse to embrace one of the opposite sex.
  295. convallamarin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      convallamarin (kon-val-am'-ar-in) [convallaria; amarus, bitter], CnHwOu. A glucoside derived from Convallaria majalis. It ia soluble in water and is used as a cardiac stimulant. Dose ^ gr. (0.05 Gm.). Syn., convallamarinum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      convallamarin (kon-val-am'ar-in) lamcailaria + L. ama'rus bitter], A poisonous glucosid, C,jHMOu, from Comalla'ria maja'lit: emetic, diuretic, and cardiant. Dose, $-1 gr. (0.013-0.065 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      convallam'arin [L. amarus, bitter.] A bitter glucoside obtained from convallaria; tonic and diuretic in doses of gr. J-i (0.03-0.06).
  296. convolvulin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      convolvulin (kon-vol'-vu-lin) [convolvere, to roll together], CsiHwOn. A glucoside derived from the roots of jalap (Convolvulus purge). It is a gummy mass, with active purgative properties.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      convolvulin (kon-vol'yu-lin). A purgative glucosid, (",,l |....n,,., from jalap. Dose, i-a gr. (0.060.13 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      convol'vulin. A white odorless glucoside, C^lIiaO,,, obtained from jalap; purgative in doses of gr. i-'i (0.03-0.1).
  297. coprolagnia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coprolagnia (kop-ro-lag'nl-ah) [G. kopros, dung, + lagneia, lust.] A form of sexual perversion in which the thought or sight of excrement causes pleasurable sensation.
  298. coprolith - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coprolith (krip'-ru-litli) [copra-; Xttor, a stone]. A hard mass of fecal matter in the bowels.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coprolith (kop'ro-lith) [G. kopros, filth, + lithos, stone.] A hard mass consisting of inspissated feces.
  299. coprology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coprol'ogy [G. kopros, feces, + -ology.] Scatology, the physiology and pathology of intestinal digestion.
  300. coprostasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coprostasis' (kop-ros'-tas-is) [copro-; vrtoru, a standing]. The accumulation of fecal matter in the bowel.
  301. coracobrachialis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coracobrachialis (kor-ak-o-brd-ke-al'-is). See under muscle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cor"acobrachia'lis. See tabic of muscles. under muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coracobrachialis (kor'a-ko-bra-kl-alis). Relating to the coracoid process of the scapula and the arm, noting a muscle, which see under musculus.
  302. cordyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cordyl (kor'-dil). See aceiyl tribromsalol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cor'dyl. Acetyltribromsalol.
  303. corectopia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corectopia (kor-ek-U/~pe-ah) [core (4); txrorot, misplaced]. An anomalous position of the pupil; displacement of the pupil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corecto'pia [G. kore, pupil, + ektopos, out of place.] Presence of the pupil to one side of the center of the iris.
  304. coredialysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coredialysis (kor-e-di-al'-is-is) [core (4); iiAXwu, dialysis]. The production of an artificial pupil at the ciliary border of the iris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coredialysis (kor-e-di-al'I-sis) [G. kore, pupil, -» dialysis, separation.] Iridodialysis.
  305. coreometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coreometer (kor-e-om'-et-er) [core (4); fiirpav, a measure]. An instrument for measuring the pupil of the eye.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coreometer (kor-e-om'e-ter) [G. kore, pupil, -fmelron, measure.] An instrument for measuring the width of the pupil.
  306. coretomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coretomy (kor-et'-o-me) [core (4); Tifww*-. to cut]. Iridotomy or iridectomy; any surgical cutting operation on the iris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coret'omy [G. kore, pupil, + tome, incision.] Indotomy.
  307. coriamyrtin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coriamyrtin (kore-am-er'-tin) [Coriaria myrtifolia, myrtle], doHiiOio. An exceedingly poisonous principle, a glucoside, obtained from the fruit of Coriaria
  308. coriandrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coriandrol (kor-e-an'-drol), CioHiip. The chief constituent of oil of coriander; a liquid isomeric with borneol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coriandrol (ko-re-an'drol). A fragrant, colorless liquid, (',, 11,,(i, from oil of coriander.
  309. corneitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corneitis (kor-ne-i'tis). Inflammation of the cor-nea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corneitis (kor-ne-i'(e')tis). Keratitis.
  310. corneum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corneum (kor-ne'-um). The stratum coraeum or horny layer of the skin,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cor'neum. The horny layer of the skin.
  311. cornin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cornin (kor-nin) [corneus, horny]. A precipitate from the tincture of the bark of Dogwood, Cornus
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cor'nin. Cornic acid; a bitter principle obtained from the bark of Cornus florida.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cornin (kor'nin). i. A concentration prepared from the bark of Cor'nus ftor'ida: tonic and antiperiodic. Dose, 2-4 gr. (0.133-0.266 gm.). a. A crystalline principle said to be obtainable from Cor'nus fior'ida. 3. A preparation from the bark of Cor'nus nutlal'lii, a tree of western North America.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cor'nin. An eclectic preparation, a resin from Comus florida in the form of a brown bitter powder; used in malaria and as a tonic in doses of p.t-S (0.13-0.3).
  312. cornua - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cornua (knr'-nu-ak) [L.]. Plural of cornu.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cornua (kor'nu-uh). Plural of cornu.
  313. cornual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cornual ikor'-nfi-al) [cornu}. Relating to a
  314. coronillin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coronillin (kor-o~nilr-in) [see coroniUa], A glucoside, C?HuOi, from CoroniUa scorpioides; it is a cardiac tonic and diuretic. Dose i-a gr. (0.06-0.13 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coronillin (kor-o-nil'in). A pale-yellow, bitter glucosid, C,HuOj, from the seeds of Corontt'la scorpioi'dcs, a European leguminous plant: a diuretic and heart stimulant. Dose, i-a gr. (0.06-0.13 Km.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coron'illin. A glucoside from coronilla; dose, gr. i (0.06).
  315. coronitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coronitis (knr-o-ni'-tis). Inflammation of the coronary substance of the horse's hoof.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coronitis (kor-o-ni'tis). Inflammation of the coronary cushion of the horse.
  316. coroplasty - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coroplasty (ko'-ro-plas-U). Same as coreplasty.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coroplasty (ko'ro-plas-te). Same as coreoplasly.
  317. corrugator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corrugator (kor'-u-ga-lor) [corrugere, to wrinkle]. That which wrinkles. See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corrugator (cor'u-ga-tor) [L. con together + n/to wrinkle]. That which wrinkles; a muscle which wrinkles, c. supercil'ti. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corr'ugator [L. corrugare, to wrinkle.] A muscle which draws together the skin, causing it to wrinkle, c. cu'tis a'ni, c. supercil'ii, see under musculus.
  318. corticifugal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ""corticifugal (kor-te-sif'-u-gar) [cortex; fugere, to flee] Conducting away from the cortex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corticifugal (kor-tis-ifu-gal) [L. cor'tex cortex •(Jvfgcrc to flee]. Proceeding, conducting, or moving away from the cortex.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corticifugal (kor-tl-sif'ugal) [L. cortex, rind, bark. + fugere, to flee.) Passing in a direction away from the outer surface, noting especially nerve fibers conveying impulses away from the brain cortex.
  319. corticipetal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corticipetal (kar-te-sip'-et-al) [cortex; petere. to seek]. Conducting toward the cortex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corticipetal (kor-tis-ip'et-al) [L. cor'tex cortex + pe'tere to seek]. Moving, progressing, or conducting toward the cortex.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corticipetal (kor-tt-sip'e-tal) [L. cortex, rind, bark. + petere, to seek.] Passing in a direction toward the outer surface, noting especially nerve fibers conveying impulses toward the cerebral cortex.
  320. corydaline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corydaline (kar-id'-al-in). An alkaloid, CuHnNOt (Freund) from Corydalis tiiberosa; it is used as a heart-tonic. Dose 1-5 gr. (0.065-0.032 Gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corydaline (kor-id'al-«n). An alkaloid, C,,H19NO4, from corydalis; tonic and diuretic in doses of gr. i—i (0.03—0.06).
  321. cosmoline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cosmoline (koz'-mo-len). See petrolatum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cosmoline (koz'mo-len). Trade name of various preparations of solid and liquid paraffin, resembling vaseline.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cosmoline (koz'mo-len). Trade name of various preparations of solid and liquid paraffin, resembling vaseline.
  322. costalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      costalgia (kos-tal'-je-ah) [costa, a rib; 4XTM, pain]. Intercostal neuralgia; pain in the ribs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      costal'gia [L. costa, rib, + G. algos, pain.] Pleuralgia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      costalgia (kos-tal'je-ah) [L. cos'ta rib + Gr. SX-yoj pain]. Pain in the ribs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      costal'gia [L. costa, rib, + G. algos, pain.] Pleuralgia.
  323. costiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      costiferous (kos-tif'er-us) [L. cos'ta rib -f- fer're to carry]. Bearing a rib, as the dorsal vertebra of man.
  324. costiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      costiform (kos'-te-form). Rib-shaped.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cos'tiform [L. costa, rib, + forma, form.] Ribshaped.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cos'tiform. Rib-shaped. [Lat-, costa, rib, + forma, form.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      costiform (kos'tif-orm). Shaped like a rib.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cos'tiform [L. costa, rib, + forma, form.] Ribshaped.
  325. costosternal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      costoster'nal. Relating to the ribs and the sternum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cos"toster'nal. Pertaining to a rib or the ribs and to the sternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      costosternal (kos-to-ster'nal). Pertaining to a rib and to the sternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      costoster'nal. Relating to the ribs and the sternum.
  326. costovertebral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      costovertebral (kos-to-ter-te'-bral). Pertaining to the ribs and vertebrae.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      costovertebral (kos-to-vur'te-bral). Costocentral.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      costovertebral (kos-to-vur'te-bral). Costocentral.
  327. cotarnine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cotarnine (ko-lar'-nin) [an anagram of narcotine], CuHiiNOi. An oxidation-product of narcotine. c. hydrochloride, CiiHuNOt. HC1. HrO, small yellow crystals, soluble in water and alcohol. It is an internal hemostatic. Dose \-i gr. (o.o*-o.u Cm.). Syn., slypticin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cotarnine (ko'tar-n8n) fa transposition of narcotine.] An alkaloidal principle, CuHu NC>4, derived from narcotine by the action of oxydizing agents; astringent, c. hydrochlo'ride, cotarni'na? hydrochlor'idum (U.S.), stypticin, occurs in rose colored granular crystals; employed in hemorrhage, especially uterine hemorrhage, locally in I or 2 per cent, solution, or internally in doses of gr. J—2 (0.015—0.13). c. phthal'ate, styptol, a yellow crystalline powder, employed as a uterine hemostatic in doses of gr. f (o .05) from three to five times a day.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cotarnine (ko'tar-n8n) fa transposition of narcotine.] An alkaloidal principle, CuHu NC>4, derived from narcotine by the action of oxydizing agents; astringent, c. hydrochlo'ride, cotarni'na? hydrochlor'idum (U.S.), stypticin, occurs in rose colored granular crystals; employed in hemorrhage, especially uterine hemorrhage, locally in I or 2 per cent, solution, or internally in doses of gr. J—2 (0.015—0.13). c. phthal'ate, styptol, a yellow crystalline powder, employed as a uterine hemostatic in doses of gr. f (o .05) from three to five times a day.
  328. cotyloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cotyloid (tol'-i'J-oM) [mra cup; Mot, form). Cup-shaped, c. cavity, c. fossa, the acetabulum. c. ligament, a ligament surrounding the acetabulum. c. notch, a notch in the anterior and lower border of the acetabulum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cot'yloid [G. kotyle, a small cup, + eidos, appearance.] I. Cup-shaped, cup-like. 2. Acetabular, relating to the cotyloid cavity or acetabulum. c. cav'ity, acetabulum. c. lig'ament, labrum<span class=
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cot'yloid [G. kotyle, a small cup, + eidos, appearance.] I. Cup-shaped, cup-like. 2. Acetabular, relating to the cotyloid cavity or acetabulum. c. cav'ity, acetabulum. c. lig'ament, labrum atresia of the hymen or of the vaginaRetention of the menses is a more acc= rate definition. TGr., kryplos. concealed, 4- meniaia, menses, + rein, to flow.]
  329. cryptopine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cryptopine (krip'-to-pen) [crypto-; feru>». opium), CjiHuNOj. Oneof the alkaloids of opium, colorless and odorless. It is said to be anodyne and hypnotic, but it is less safe than morphine. Dose i gr. (0.008 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cryptopine (krip'to-p5n) [G. kryptos, hidden, + opion, opium.] An alkaloid derived from opium, Cj,HnNOi; a colorless, prismatic crystalline powder, slightly soluble in water; hypnotic and analgesic in doses of gr. -jlj-J (0.005-0.008).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cryptopine (krip'to-p5n) [G. kryptos, hidden, + opion, opium.] An alkaloid derived from opium, Cj,HnNOi; a colorless, prismatic crystalline powder, slightly soluble in water; hypnotic and analgesic in doses of gr. -jlj-J (0.005-0.008).
  330. cryptozygous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cryptozygous (krip-tos'-ig-us) [crypto-; firyAr, yoke). Having the dental arches or zygomata concealed from view when the skull is viewed from above.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cryptoz'ygous [G. kryptos, hidden, + tygon, yoke.] Having a narrow face as compared with the width of the cranium, so that, when the skull is viewed from above, the zygomatic arches are not visible.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cryptoz'ygous [G. kryptos, hidden, + tygon, yoke.] Having a narrow face as compared with the width of the cranium, so that, when the skull is viewed from above, the zygomatic arches are not visible.
  331. crystallophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      crystallophobia (kris"tal-o-fo'be-ah) [crystal + Gr fear]. Insane dread of glass objects.
  332. cubital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cubital (ku'-tit-oT). Relating to the forearm, to the elbow, or to the ulna. c. bone, the cuneiform bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cu'bital. Relating to the forearm, or more particularly to the ulna. c. bone, cuneiform bone, os* triquetrum. c. nerve, nervus ulnaris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cu'bital. Relating to the forearm, or more particularly to the ulna. c. bone, cuneiform bone, os* triquetrum. c. nerve, nervus ulnaris.
  333. cudbear - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cudbear (kud'bair). Persio (N.F.), a red-brown powder obtained from certain lichens, especially Lecanora tarlarea, by heating with diluted ammonia and then treating with sulphuric acid and sodium chloride; it is used in the arts as a dye and in pharmacy as a coloring agent; see tinctura persionis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cudbear (kudT>8r). A red-brown powder, obtained from lichens, such as Lecano'ra larla'rea: used as a coloring-matter in pharmacy. Called also persio.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cudbear (kud'bair). Persio (N.F.), a red-brown powder obtained from certain lichens, especially Lecanora tarlarea, by heating with diluted ammonia and then treating with sulphuric acid and sodium chloride; it is used in the arts as a dye and in pharmacy as a coloring agent; see tinctura persionis.
  334. culicicide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicicide (ku-lis'is-Id). Same as culicide.
  335. culicide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cu'licide. An agent which destroys mosquitos.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicide (ku'lis-Id) [L. ni'lex gnat + cafdcrt to kill]. An agent destructive to gnats and Seas.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cu'licide. An agent which destroys mosquitos.
  336. culicifuge - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      culicifuge (ku-lis'-if-uf) [culex; fugare, to drive away]. An agent to drive away .nosquitoes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      culicifuge (ku-list-fuj) [L. culcx(culic-), mosquito, + fugare, to drive away.] i. Driving away gnats and mosquitos. a. An agent which keeps mosquitos from biting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicifuge (ku-lis'if-Oj) [L. cuflex gnat -f- /u'fo banishment]. A preparation intended to prevent the attacks of gnats and mosquitos.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      culicifuge (ku-list-fuj) [L. culcx(culic-), mosquito, + fugare, to drive away.] i. Driving away gnats and mosquitos. a. An agent which keeps mosquitos from biting.
  337. cunnilinguist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cunnilinguist (kun"I-l:ng'gwist) [L. cunnus, pudenda, + lingua, tongue.] A female pervert who makes lingual friction of the vulva of another. cun'nus [L.] Pudenda, vulva. CuO. Cupric oxide, black oxide of copper. Cu,0. Cuprous oxide, red oxide of copper. cuorin (ku'or-in). A lipoid substance existing in the heart muscle and found nowhere else; it is allied to lecithin, but is a diphosphatid, containing two phosphate group radicles instead of one. cup [A. S. cuppe.] i. An excavated or cup-shaped structure, either anatomical or pathological, a. A cupping-glass. 3. To apply a cupping-glass. dry c., a cupping-glass applied to the unbroken surface for the purpose of drawing blood to the part without abstracting any; see wet c. glauco'matous c., an excavation of the optic disc occurring in glaucoma, op'tic c., the secondary ocular vesicle, made cup-shaped by pressure of the lenticular vesicle, physiolog'ical c., a funnelshaped excavation of the optic disc, an exaggeration of the normal depression, caused by the dragging of the ciliary muscle in efforts at accommodation, refinal c., excavation of the optic disc, wet c., a cupping-glass applied to a part previously scarified or incised, in order to draw away blood, cu'pola. Cupula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cunnilinguist (kun-il-in'gwist) [L. funnitin'fus]. A sexual pervert who licks the vulva.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cunnilinguist (kun"I-l:ng'gwist) [L. cunnus, pudenda, + lingua, tongue.] A female pervert who makes lingual friction of the vulva of another. cun'nus [L.] Pudenda, vulva. CuO. Cupric oxide, black oxide of copper. Cu,0. Cuprous oxide, red oxide of copper. cuorin (ku'or-in). A lipoid substance existing in the heart muscle and found nowhere else; it is allied to lecithin, but is a diphosphatid, containing two phosphate group radicles instead of one. cup [A. S. cuppe.] i. An excavated or cup-shaped structure, either anatomical or pathological, a. A cupping-glass. 3. To apply a cupping-glass. dry c., a cupping-glass applied to the unbroken surface for the purpose of drawing blood to the part without abstracting any; see wet c. glauco'matous c., an excavation of the optic disc occurring in glaucoma, op'tic c., the secondary ocular vesicle, made cup-shaped by pressure of the lenticular vesicle, physiolog'ical c., a funnelshaped excavation of the optic disc, an exaggeration of the normal depression, caused by the dragging of the ciliary muscle in efforts at accommodation, refinal c., excavation of the optic disc, wet c., a cupping-glass applied to a part previously scarified or incised, in order to draw away blood, cu'pola. Cupula.
  338. cupping-glass - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cupp'ing-glass. A glass vessel, from which the air has been exhausted by heat or a special suction apparatus, applied to the skin in order to draw blood to the surface.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cupping-glass (kup'ing-glas). See ciuurbitula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cupp'ing-glass. A glass vessel, from which the air has been exhausted by heat or a special suction apparatus, applied to the skin in order to draw blood to the surface.
  339. cuprammonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cuprammonia (ku-pra-mo'nl-ah). A mixture of a solution of copper hydroxide and aqua ammoniac.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cuprammonia (ku-pra-mo'nl-ah). A mixture of a solution of copper hydroxide and aqua ammoniac.
  340. cupreine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cupreine (ku'-pre-in), CiiHnNiOi. An alkaloid derived from cuprea bark.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cupreine (ku'pre-en). An alkaloid, CuHjjNjOj + aHsO, from cuprea-bark, occurring in the form of colorless crystals.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cupreine (ku'pre-en). An alkaloid, CuHjjNjOj + aHsO, from cuprea-bark, occurring in the form of colorless crystals.
  341. cupula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cupula (ku'pu-lah) [L. a cup, dim. of cupa, a tub.] Cupola, i. A fine striated membranous structure covering the hair cells of the crista ampul
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cupula (ku'pu-lah). A membranous structure on the crista acustica in the ampulla of the ear. c. pleu'rtB [B N A], the cervical pleura. See pleura.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cupula (ku'pu-lah) [L. a cup, dim. of cupa, a tub.] Cupola, i. A fine striated membranous structure covering the hair cells of the crista ampul
  342. curarize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      curarize (ku'-rah-rft). To bring a subject under the influence of curara.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cu'rarize. To induce motor, but not sensory paralysis by the administration of curare.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cu'rarize. To induce motor, but not sensory paralysis by the administration of curare.
  343. curet - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      curet (ku-ref) [Fr.]. A kind of scraper or spoon for removing growths or other matter from the walls of cavities. Hartmann's c., a curet for removing adenoids.
  344. curettement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      curettement (ku-ret'-ment) [Fr.t curettement]. The removal of vegetations, retained placenta, etc., by means of a curet. Syn., curetagt; cureting; curettate; curettement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Curettage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Same as curettage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Curettage.
  345. cusso - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cusso (koos'o) [an Abyssinian word.] (Br.) Kousso, brayera (N.P.); the dried female inflorescence of Hagenia abyssinica (Brayera anthetmintica), a tree of the elevated regions of Abyssinia; employed as a teniacide, in doses of S i (15.0) of the fluidextract, or SJ-i (15.0-30.0) of the infusion.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cus'so. See kusso.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cusso (koos'o) [an Abyssinian word.] (Br.) Kousso, brayera (N.P.); the dried female inflorescence of Hagenia abyssinica (Brayera anthetmintica), a tree of the elevated regions of Abyssinia; employed as a teniacide, in doses of S i (15.0) of the fluidextract, or SJ-i (15.0-30.0) of the infusion.
  346. cuticularization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cuticularization Iku-tiJt-u-lar-it-a'-shun) [culicula, dim. of culis, the skin]. The formation of a cuticula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutic"ulariza'tion. Healing of an abrasion of the skin or ulcer by the spread of epidermis over the surface.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutic"ulariza'tion. Healing of an abrasion of the skin or ulcer by the spread of epidermis over the surface.
  347. cutisector - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cutisector (ku-le-sek'-lor) [cults; sector, a cutter]. An instrument for taking small sections of akin from the living subject.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutisector (ku"H-seVtor) [L. cutis, skin, + sector, a cutter.] i. An instrument for cutting bits of epidermis for grafting. 3. An instrument for removing a section or cylinder of skin for microscopical examination.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutisector (ku"H-seVtor) [L. cutis, skin, + sector, a cutter.] i. An instrument for cutting bits of epidermis for grafting. 3. An instrument for removing a section or cylinder of skin for microscopical examination.
  348. cutitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cutitis (ka-tr-lis). Same as dermatitis, a. r.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutitis (ku-ti'(te')tis). Dermatitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutitis (ku-ti'(te')tis). Dermatitis.
  349. cutization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutiza'tion. The transition from mucous membrane to skin at the mucocutaneous margins.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutiza'tion. The transition from mucous membrane to skin at the mucocutaneous margins.
  350. cyanopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyanopathy (si-an-op'-a-the). See cyanosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyanop'athy [G. kyanos, blue, + pathos, suffering.] Blue disease of infants; cyanosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyanop'athy [G. kyanos, blue, + pathos, suffering.] Blue disease of infants; cyanosis.
  351. cyanurin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyanurin (si-an-t'-rin) [riom, blue; olpov, urine]. Uroglaucin or urine-indigo; indigo found in the urine in cystitis and in chrorrc kidney-diseases; it is also occasionally found in apparent health. ,
  352. cyclarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyclarthrosis (sik-lar-lhro'-sis) [«<*Xoi, a circle; &p6pbxrtf, a joint]. A circular or rotatory articulation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyclarthro'sis [G. kyklos, circle, + arthrosis, articulation.] A rotary, or lateral ginglymus, joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyclarthro'sis [G. kyklos, circle, + arthrosis, articulation.] A rotary, or lateral ginglymus, joint.
  353. cyclitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyclitis (si-kli'(kle')tis) [G. kyklos, circle (ciliary body), + -ttis.] Inflammation of the ciliary body, plas'tic c., inflammation of the ciliary body, and usually of the entire uvcal tract, with a fibrinous exudation into the anterior chamber and vitreous, pure c., uncomplicated c., the iris not being involved in the inflammatory process, pu'rulent c., suppurative inflammation of the ciliary body, including usually the iris. se'rous c., simple c., serous iritis, punctate keratitis, descemetitis; simple inflammation of the ciliary body without suppuration or plastic exudate. cyclocepha'lia, cycloceph'aly [G. kyklos, round, +
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyclitis (si-kli'(kle')tis) [G. kyklos, circle (ciliary body), + -ttis.] Inflammation of the ciliary body, plas'tic c., inflammation of the ciliary body, and usually of the entire uvcal tract, with a fibrinous exudation into the anterior chamber and vitreous, pure c., uncomplicated c., the iris not being involved in the inflammatory process, pu'rulent c., suppurative inflammation of the ciliary body, including usually the iris. se'rous c., simple c., serous iritis, punctate keratitis, descemetitis; simple inflammation of the ciliary body without suppuration or plastic exudate. cyclocepha'lia, cycloceph'aly [G. kyklos, round, +
  354. cyclotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyclotome (siP-lo-tom) [.i'.v.t, circle: rout*.
  355. cyesiology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyesiology (si-t-se-ol'-o-jl) [«i^(rii. pregnancy; XAr°«. treatise]. The science of gestation in its medical aspects.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyesiology (si-e-sl-ol'o-jt) [G. kiisis, pregnancy, + -logia.] Obstetrics, the branch of medical science which has to do with pregnancy and parturition
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyesiology (si-e-sl-ol'o-jt) [G. kiisis, pregnancy, + -logia.] Obstetrics, the branch of medical science which has to do with pregnancy and parturition
  356. cylindrocellular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cylin"drocell'ular. Relating to cylindrical cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cylin"drocell'ular. Relating to cylindrical cells.
  357. cylindroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cylindroid (sil'-in-droid) [cylinder; ,Hi», likeness], A name given to a mucous cast frequently found in the urine in cases of mild irritation of the kidney. Cylindroids are ribbon-like forms, usually of great length, and of about the same diameter as renal casts. They may assume various shapes. One extremity is usually pointed and may be drawn out into a long tail.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyl'indroid [G. kylindros, roll, cylinder, + eidos, appearance.] i. Resembling a cylinder; more or less cylindrical. 2. A mucous cast, false cast, an elongated mass of mucus in the urine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyl'indroid [G. kylindros, roll, cylinder, + eidos, appearance.] i. Resembling a cylinder; more or less cylindrical. 2. A mucous cast, false cast, an elongated mass of mucus in the urine.
  358. cylindroma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cylindroma (sil-in-dro'-mah) [cylinder; 6pa, a tumor]. A myxosarcoma in which the degeneration is confined to areas surrounding the blood-vessels.
  359. cynanche - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cynanche (sin-ang1-ke) [k(*h>, dog; &7xarthritic angina, c. maligna, a fatal form of sore throat, c. sublingualis, inflammation of the connective tissue of the floor of the mouth, c. suffocativa. Synonym of croup. c. tonsillaris. See quinsy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cynanche (sin-ang'ke) [G. kynancKl, a dog-collar.] Sore throat, c. malig'na, gangrenous pharyngitis, c. sublingua'lis, Ludwig's* angina, c. tonsilla'ris, tonsillitis, quinsy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cynanche (sin-ang'ke) [G. kynancKl, a dog-collar.] Sore throat, c. malig'na, gangrenous pharyngitis, c. sublingua'lis, Ludwig's* angina, c. tonsilla'ris, tonsillitis, quinsy.
  360. cyphosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyphosis (si-fo'-sis). Sec hypnosis.
  361. cypridophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cypridophobia (si-prl-do-fo'bl-ah) [G. K1 pris, Venus, + phobos, fear.] i. A morbid dread of contracting venereal disease. 2. An erroneous belief that one is suffering from venereal disease. 3. Amorbid fear of the sexual act.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cypridophobia (si-prl-do-fo'bl-ah) [G. K1 pris, Venus, + phobos, fear.] i. A morbid dread of contracting venereal disease. 2. An erroneous belief that one is suffering from venereal disease. 3. Amorbid fear of the sexual act.
  362. cypripedin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cypripedin (sii>-rip-c.'-[Kivpts, Venus; »66ioc. a slipper]. A precipitate from the tincture of Cypripedium Pubescens; antispasmodic, nervine, narcotic. Dose i to 3 grains.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyprip'edin. An eclectic concentration pr. duct from a tincture of the root of cypripedium; employed in neuralgia and hysteria in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cypripedin (sip-ri-peMin). Of the eclectics, a resinoid obtained from Cypripcdium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyprip'edin. An eclectic concentration pr. duct from a tincture of the root of cypripedium; employed in neuralgia and hysteria in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
  363. cypripedium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cypripedium (sip-re-p^'-at-urn) [Kfarpu, Venus; rteiov, a slipper]. Lady's-slipper. The roots of C. Pubescens and C. parvifiorum, American valerian. • the properties of which are due to a volatile oil and an acid. It is an antispasmodic and stimulant tonic, used instead of valerian, which it resembles. Dose of the fiuidextract 10-30 min. (0.6-1.8 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cypripedium (sip-rt-pe'dl-um) [G. Kypris, Venus, + pedion, metatarsus.] (N.F.) The rhizome and roots of Cypripedium hirsutum (C. farviflorum) yellow lady's slipper, yellow moccasin flower, American valerian, male nervine; antispasmodic and nervine, in doses of gr. 5-30 (0.3-2.0). A fluidextract is official.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cypripedium (sip-rt-pe'dl-um) [G. Kypris, Venus, + pedion, metatarsus.] (N.F.) The rhizome and roots of Cypripedium hirsutum (C. farviflorum) yellow lady's slipper, yellow moccasin flower, American valerian, male nervine; antispasmodic and nervine, in doses of gr. 5-30 (0.3-2.0). A fluidextract is official.
  364. cypriphobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cypriphobia (sip-rif-o'-be-aM) [Kfarpu. Venus, 2. Fear of contracting venereal disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cypripho'bia. Cypridophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cypripho'bia. Cypridophobia.
  365. cystadenoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystadenoma (sist-ad-en-o'-mah) [cyst; adenoma], I. An adenoma containing cysts. 2. Adenoma of the bladder, c. papillif erum, an adenoma containing cysts with papillae on the inner aspect of the cystwalls.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cystadenoma (sis"tad-e-no'mah) [cyst + adenoma]. Adenoma which has undergone cystic degeneration. C. adamanti'num. See adamanloma. c. par'tim sim'plez par'tim papillif'erum, a combination of simple and papillary cystadenoma.
  366. cystalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystalgia (sist-al'-je-ak) [cyst; l&yoi, pain]. Pain in the bladder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cystalgia (sis-tal'je-ah) [Gr. xfemi bladder + fiX-yot pain]. Pain in the bladder.
  367. cystis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystis (sisl'-is). I. A cyst. a. A bladder, c. fellea, the gall-bladder, c. urinaria, the urinary bladder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cys'tis [G. kystis.] i. Bladder, vesica. 2. A cyst. c. fellea, gall-bladder, vesica fellea [SNA], c. urina'ria, urinary bladder, vesica urinaria [SNA],
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cystis (sis'tis). A bladder, especially the urinary bladder, c. bills, c. cholcdocha, c. fcllea. The gall-bladder. [Gr., kystis, bag, pouch, from kyein, to hold.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cys'tis [G. kystis.] i. Bladder, vesica. 2. A cyst. c. fellea, gall-bladder, vesica fellea [SNA], c. urina'ria, urinary bladder, vesica urinaria [SNA],
  368. cystocarp - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystocarp (sisl'-o-karp) [cysto-; tapr/x, fruit], In biology, a name sometimes applied to the sporocarp of certain algae.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cys'tocarp [G. kystis, bladder, + karpos, fruit.] Sporocarp.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cys'tocarp [G. kystis, bladder, + karpos, fruit.] Sporocarp.
  369. cystoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystoid (sist'-oid) [cyst; tUos, likeness]. I. Having the form or appearance of a bladder or cyst. a. Composed of a collection of cysts. 3- A pseudocyst.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cys'toid [G. kystis, bladder, + eidos, appearance.] Cystiform, bladder-like, resembling a cyst. A tumor resembling a cyst with pultaceous contents, but without capsule.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cys'toid [G. kystis, bladder, + eidos, appearance.] Cystiform, bladder-like, resembling a cyst. A tumor resembling a cyst with pultaceous contents, but without capsule.
  370. cystolith - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystolith (sist'-o-litli) [cysto-; \lfot, a stone). Vesical calculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cys'tolith [G. kystis, bladder, + lithos, stone.] A vesical calculus, a stone in the urinary bladder.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cystolith (sis'to-lith). A vesical calculus. [Gr., kystis, a sac, + lithos, a stone.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cys'tolith [G. kystis, bladder, + lithos, stone.] A vesical calculus, a stone in the urinary bladder.
  371. cystolithiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystolithiasis (rist-o-liUt-i'-oi-is) [cysto-; XWof. a stone]. Stone in the bladder; also that condition of the system that is associated "with the presence of vesical calculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cystolithiasis (sis-to-H-thi'a-sis) [G. kystis, bladder + lithos, stone.] Stone in the bladder; the presence of a vesical calculus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cystolithiasis (sis-to-H-thi'a-sis) [G. kystis, bladder + lithos, stone.] Stone in the bladder; the presence of a vesical calculus.
  372. cystoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystoma (sist-o'-mah) [cyst; Apa. a tumor: pi., cystomata], A newgrowth made up of cysts; applied especially to ovarian cysts, c. glandulare proliferum, c. proliferum papillare, proliferating cystoma, a cystic formation derived from gland-ducts and acini. It is the most common form of ovarian and pancreatic cystoma; the lining of the inner wall consists of epithelium showing papillomatous growths or crypts resembling the acini of a gland. Syn., cylindrocellular adenoma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cystoma (sis-to'mah). A cystic tumor unaccompanied by true tissue proliferation. Adami considers this a misnomer, ovarian c. A tumor of the ovary consisting of one or more cysts, including the simple, the proliferating, and the dermoid cysts, papillary c. A c. in which the papillary. growth is very pronounced. [Gr., kystis, cyst.]
  373. cystose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystose (sisl'-is) [cysl]. Cystic; full of cysts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cystose (sis'toz). Cystic, cystous, containing cysts,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cystose (sis'toz). Cystic, cystous, containing cysts,
  374. cystotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystotome (sist'-o-tSm) [see cystotomy], A knife used in cystotomy; also a knife used in rupturing the cap«ule of the lens in cataract operations.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cys'totome [G. kystis, bladder, + loml, a cutting.] An instrument for incising (i) the urinary or gallbladder, or (3) the capsule of the lens in a cataract operation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cys'totome [G. kystis, bladder, + loml, a cutting.] An instrument for incising (i) the urinary or gallbladder, or (3) the capsule of the lens in a cataract operation.
  375. cytase - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytase (si'taz) [G. kyios, hollow (cell), + -ase, noting an enzyme.] Metchnikoff's term for alexin or complement, which he holds to be a digestive secretion of the leucocyte, cytas'ter [G. kytos, cell, + aster, star.] Aster. cytax (si'taks) [G. kytos, cell, + L. laxare, to estimate.] An apparatus for counting automatically the red cells, leucocytes, and lymphocytes of the blood and registering their relative proportions, cythaemolysis, cythemolysis (si-tem-(them-) ol'i-sis) [G. kytos, a hollow vessel (cell), + haima, blood, + lysis, solution.] Destruction or solution of the blood corpuscles; hemolysis, hemocytolysis. cjrthemolyfic (si-tem(them)-o-lit'ik). Relating to
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytase (si'tas) |Gr. icdrm cell + -a«). i. Metchnikoff's term for the complement regarded as a ferment. 2. An enzyme occurring in the seeds of various plants, having the power of making soluble the material of the cell-wall.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytase (si'taz) [G. kyios, hollow (cell), + -ase, noting an enzyme.] Metchnikoff's term for alexin or complement, which he holds to be a digestive secretion of the leucocyte, cytas'ter [G. kytos, cell, + aster, star.] Aster. cytax (si'taks) [G. kytos, cell, + L. laxare, to estimate.] An apparatus for counting automatically the red cells, leucocytes, and lymphocytes of the blood and registering their relative proportions, cythaemolysis, cythemolysis (si-tem-(them-) ol'i-sis) [G. kytos, a hollow vessel (cell), + haima, blood, + lysis, solution.] Destruction or solution of the blood corpuscles; hemolysis, hemocytolysis. cjrthemolyfic (si-tem(them)-o-lit'ik). Relating to
  376. cytheromania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytheromania (silh-ur-o-ma'-ne-ah). See nymphomania.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytheromania (sith'er-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. Cythera, one of the names of Aphrodite or Venus, + mania, frenzy.] Nymphomania. cyt'Uine. An alkaloid, CnHuNsO, from the seeds
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytheromania (sith"er-o-ma'ne-ah) [Gr. nvtttpa. Venus + nai'ia madness]. Nymphomania.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytheromania (sith'er-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. Cythera, one of the names of Aphrodite or Venus, + mania, frenzy.] Nymphomania. cyt'Uine. An alkaloid, CnHuNsO, from the seeds
  377. cytoblastema - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytoblastema (*i-tn-blm-tr'-mah). See 1'lnstrma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cytoblastema (si-to-blas-te'mah). Syn.: blastema, i. Formative fluid, ground (or intercellular, or hyaline) substance; the fluid, semifluid, or solid intercellular substance in which cells were supposed to be developed by free cell formation. 2. The contents of cells which give rise to young cells. [Gr., kytos, cell, + blastema, sprout.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytoblastema (si"to-blas-te'mah) [Gr. lArot cell + blastema]. The mother-liquid of cells.
  378. cytode - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytode (si'-ted) \cyto-; Mat, form]. The simplest, most primitive form of cell, without nucleus or nucleolus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cytode (si'tod). The name given by Verworn to hypothetical living substance* consisting of undifferentiated protoplasm not showing the usual cellular structures.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytode (si'tod) [Gr. nfcros cell + tlSm form). A non-nucleated cell or cell-element.
  379. cytogeny - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytogeny (si-toj'-tn-t). See cytogeitesis.
  380. cytoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytoid (si'-loid) [firm, cell; eUoi, likeness]. Resembling a cell.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cy'toid [G. kytos, cell, -f- eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a cell, cytode.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cy'toid [G. kytos, cell, -f- eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a cell, cytode.
  381. cytotaxis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytotaxis (si-to-taks'-is) (cyto-; rdf«, order]. The directive influence which determines the arrangement of cells. The selective, ordering, and arranging function of a living cell.
  382. cytotherapy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytother'apy [G. kytos, hollow vessel, cell, + thtrapeia, healing.] Opotherapy, organotherapy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytotherapy (si-to-ther'ap-e) [Gr. Kvtos cell + Stpairtia. treatment]. Treatment by the administration of animal cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytother'apy [G. kytos, hollow vessel, cell, + thtrapeia, healing.] Opotherapy, organotherapy.
  383. cytotropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [G. kytos, cell, + tropi, a. turning.] Having an affinity for cells.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [Gr. ultra* cell + rpoirii a turn). Attracting cells; having affinity for cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [G. kytos, cell, + tropi, a. turning.] Having an affinity for cells.