User:Visviva/Medical/By links/C

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  1. cacotrophy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cacotrophy (kak-of-ro-fe) [coco-; rpo^, nourishment). Disordered or defective nutrition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cacotrophy (kak-ot'ro-fe) [Gr. rpo^ nourishment]. Malnutrition; impaired or disor dered nourishment.
  2. calage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calage (kah-lahzh') [Fr.]. Propping with pillows to immobilize the viscera and thus relieve seasickness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calage (kal-azh') [Fr. wedging.] Wedging the body in the berth by means of pillows, in order to prevent rolling in case of seasickness.
  3. calcicosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calcicosis (kul-sik-o'-sis) [caLt]. Marble-cutter's phthisis; a chronic inflammation of the lung due to the inhalation of marble-dust.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calcicosis (kal-sik-o'sis) [L. calx lime]. Marblecutters' phthisis; pneumonia due to the inhalation of marble-dust.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      calcicosis (kal-sl-ko'sis). Pneumonoconiosis from the inhalation of limestone dust; marble-cutter's phthisis.
  4. calmin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      calmin (kal'-min). A compound of antipyrine and heroine; it is used in asthma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      calmin (kahm'in). The proprietary name for the sodium salt of veronal: used as a hypnotic.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      calmin. A proprietary mixture of heroin and antipyrin; used in whooping cough.
  5. cambogia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cambogia (kam-bo'je-ah) [LJ. Gamboge; a yd low gum-resin from Garcin'ia hanbu'rii and otlie: guttiferous East Indian trees. It is a drastii hydragogue cathartic. Dose, 1-5 gr. (0.06-0.. gm.).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cambogia (kam-bo'je-ah). Of the U. S. Ph. and Br. Ph., gamboge.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cambo'gia (U.S. and Br.). Gamboge, a gum resin obtained from Garcinia hanburii; purgative and anthelmintic in doses of gr. ^-5 (0.015-0.3). c. in'dica (B.A.), Indian gamboge, the gum resin from Garcinia morella; cathartic in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
  6. camp-fever - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      camp-fever. A popular name for typhus fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      camp-fe'ver. Typhus* fever.
  7. cancerism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cancerism (kan'-scr-izm). The tendency to cancerous formation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cancerism (kan'ser-izm). The cancerous diathesi a tendency to the development of malignant diseas
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cancerism (kan'ser-izm). The cancerous diathesis; a tendency to the development of malignant disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      can'cerism. A hypothetical tendency to the development of malignant disease.
  8. canchalagua - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      canchalagua (kan-shah-lah'gwah). The Eryl rafa chilen'sis, a South American tonic her used like gentian.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canchalagua (kan-shah-lah'gwah). The Erythrif',i chilen'sis, a South American tonic herb: used like gentian.
  9. cancrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cancrum (kang'-krum) [cancer], A cancer or rapidly spreading ulcer, c. nasi, gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. oris, a disease of childhood between the ages of one and five, characterized by the formation of foul, deep ulcers of the bucca Isurfaces of the cheeks or lips. There is but slight pain, but the prostration is great, and death usually results from exhaustion or blood-poisoning. The disease is bacterial, poor hygienic surroundings and a debilitated system being predisposing causes. Syn., rn*ber of the mouth; gangrenous stomatitis; noma;
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cancrum (kan'krum) [L.J. Canker, c. nas gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. o'ris, non of the mouth, or gangrenous stomatitis, a disea of childhood marked by the development foul ulcers in the mucous membrane of the chee and lips. The disease is attended with pre exhaustion, and death frequently ensues, puden'di, ulceration of the pudenda.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cancrum (kan'krum) [L.]. Canker. C. na'si, gangrenous rhinitis of children, c. O'ris, noma of the mouth, or gangrenous stomatitis, a disease of childhood marked by the development of foul ulcers in the mucous membrane of the cheeks and lips. The disease is attended with great exhaustion, and death frequently ensues. C. puden'di, ulceration of the pudenda.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      can'crum [L. cancer.] A gangrenous ulceration. c. na'si, gangrenous inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane, c. o'ris, noma,* gangrenous stomatitis.
  10. candol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      candol (kan'dol). A dry malt extract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      candol (kan'dol). A dry malt extract.
  11. canthitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      canthitis (kan-thi'tis). Inflammation of a canthus or of the canthi.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      canthitis (kan-thi'(the')tis) [G. kanthos, canthus, + -t'.'ts.] Inflammation of a canthus.
  12. capiat - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capiat (ka'-pc-al) [L., "let it take"]. An instrument intended for use in removing remnants of the placenta, polypi, or the like, from the uterine cavity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capiat (ka'pe-at) [L. "let it take"]. An instrument for removing foreign bodies from a cavity, as of the uterus.
  13. capilliculture - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capilliculture (kap-il'e-kul-tur) [L. capil'lus hair + i ill:H'i,i culture]. Treatment for the cure of baldness or the preservation of the hair.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capill'iculture [L. capittus, hair, + cnltura, culture.] The care of the hair; treatment of baldness or other diseases of the hair.
  14. capitellum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capitellum (kap-il-el'-um) [dim. of caput}. I. A small head or rounded process of bone. 2. The rounded, external surface of the lower end of the humerus. 3. The bulb of a hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      capitellum (kap-it-erum) [L. dim. of ca'pul head]. An eminence on the distal end of the humerus, articulating with the radius.
  15. caprizant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caprizant (kap'-ri-ianl) [see capric]. Leaping; of '•*egular motion, applied to the pulse.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cap'rizant. Bounding, leaping, noting a form of pulse-beat.
  16. capsella - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      capsella (kap-sel'-ah) [dim. of capsa, a box). The leaves and stems of C. bursa posloris, common in temperate climates. C. bursa pastoris, shepherd'* purse; theleaves are hemostatic and antiscorbutic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      capsell'a [L. dim. of capsa, a box.] Shepherd's purse, herba capsellse; the dried herb Bursa
  17. car-sickness - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      car-sickness. The symptoms similar to those of sea-sickness produced by riding in railway cars.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      car-sickness (kar-sik'nes). An attack, not unlike sea-sickness, induced by railway travel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      car-sickness (kar-sik'nes). An attack, not unlike sea-sickness, induced by railway travel.
  18. cardin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardin (kar'din). An animal extract from ox's heart, prescribed in heart diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardin (kaKdin). An animal extract from ox's heart, prescribed in heart diseases.
  19. cardiokinetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardiokinetic (kar-de-o-kin-ef-ik) [cardio-; KocZc, to move], i. Exciting the heart-action. 2. An agent which excites the action of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardiokinetic (kar"de-o-kin-et'ik). 1. Exciting the heart. 2. A remedy that excites the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cardiokinetic (kar"de-o-kin-et'ik). i. Exciting the heart. 2. A remedy that excites the heart.
  20. cardioscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cardioscope (kar'-dc-o-skStf) [cardio-; a-corcf*, to view]. An instrument for the observation of the movements or of lesions of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cardioscope (kar'de-o-skdp) [Gr. KapSia heart + cKo-miv to examine]. Same as cardiophone.
  21. carmin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carmin (kar'min). A red coloring-matter derived from cochineal: used as a histologic stain. borax c., an alkaline staining fluid made of borax, carmin, and water: used as a red nuclear stain. See stain:, table of. c.-red, a stain, uil,.,Orth's Klbium-farmin, under stains, table of. Schneider's C., a saturated solution of carmin in concentrated acetic acid.
  22. caroba - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caroba (kah-ro'bah). See Jacaranda.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caroba (kah-ro'bah). See Jacaranda.
  23. carolinium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'-c-um). The provisional namejjiven by Baskerville to a supposed new element obtained from thorium oxide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'e-um). A supposed element obtained from thorium oxid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carolinium (kar-o-lin'e-um). A supposed element obtained from thorium oxid.
  24. carpitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carpitis (kar-pi'-tis) \carpus; tri*. inflammation]. Inflammation of one or more of the carpal joints.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      carpitis (kar-pi'tis). Inflammation of the synovial membranes of the bones of the carpal joint of domestic animals, producing swelling, pain, and lameness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      carpitis (kar-pi'tis). Inflammation of the synovia! membranes of the bones of the carpal joint of domestic animals, producing swelling, pain, and lameness.
  25. carthamus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carthamus (karth'-am-u*) {Ar., qartama. paint]. American or bastard saffron or safflower. The flowers of C. tinctorius. An infusion, "Saffron tea," is a popular domestic remedy as a diuretic in measles and other exanthematous affections.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      car'thamus. Safflower, parrot-seed, false or bastard saffron, the dried florets of Carthamus tinctorius; sometimes used in domestic practice as a hot tea externally to "bring out the eruption" in exanthematous diseases.
  26. carum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      carum (ka'-rum) {,....•, caraway]. Caraway. It is official in the U. S, P. in the form of the dried fruit of C. carvi. indigenous to Europe, and an allied species native to the Pacific coast of America. Its odor and taste are due to a volatile oil. It is used chiefly as a flavor. C. petrosclinum, parsley, is diuretic and sedative, carui, aqua (B. P.)', caraway water. Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). carui, infusum, 2 dr. to i pint. Dose j-2 oz. (15-60 Cc.). carui, oleum (U. S. P.), oil of caraway. Dose 1-5 min. (0.06-0.3 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ca'rum (U.S.), ca'rui fruc'tus (Br.). Caraway, caraway fruit; the dried nearly ripe fruit of Carum carvi (or carui), a biennial plant cultivated extensively in Siberia, Northern Europe, and the
  27. caruncula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caruncula (kar-ung'-ku-lah) [dim. of caro, flesh; pi., caruncula]. A caruncle, carunculn cuticulares, the nymphae. c. innominata, the lacrimal gland, c. major, a caruncle marking the common orifice of the common bile-duct and the pancreatic duct. c. mammillaris. i. The olfactory tubercle, between the roots of the olfactory nerves. 2. The enlarged ends of the galactophorous ducts in the nipple. c. minor, one in the duodenum in the center of which a supplementary pancreatic duct occasionally opens, c. Morgagnii, the middle lobe of the prostate, carunculie myrtiformes, the projections of membrane near the orifice of the vagina, thought to be the remains of the hymen after its rupture. caruncul«e papillares. See papilla, renal, c. saltvalis. See c. sublingualis. c. sublingualis, one marking the orifice of Wharton's duct. Syn., papilla saltvalis inferior, c. 'urethrae. See caruncle, urethral.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      carun'cula. See caruncle, carunculno ' uticularcs. The nymphae. carunculae liymcnalcs. See carunculae myrtiformes. v. lacrimalis. See lacrimal caruncle, under caruncle, c. major. A papilla marking the common orifice of the ductus choledochus communis and the pancreatic duct. c. ma mini I hi lis. 1. A small elevation of gray nervous matter at the base of the brain, giving rise to the middle root of the olfactory nerve. 2. The dilated extremities of the galactophorous ducts in the nipple, c. minor. A papilla in the duodenum, in the center of which an occasional supplementary pancreatic duct opens. carunculae myrtiformes. Irregular tonguelike projections of the mucous membrane of the ostium vaginae, the remains of the ruptured hymen, c. oculi. See lacrimal caruncle, under caruncle, carunculae papillares. Little nipplelilce projections at the hilum of the kidney marking the orifices of the uriniferous tubules, c. salivalis. See c. sublingualis, c. seminal is. See caput galli. e. sublingualis. A papilla marking the opening of Wharton's duct. c urcthrae. See urethral caruncle, c. urethrae virills. See caput gallinaginis. carunculuc vaginalcs. See carunculae myrtiformes. [B. N. A., same.] II.at., dim. of caro, flesh.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caruncula (kar-ung'ku-lah), pi. carun'cula:. Latin for caruncle, c. hymena'les [B N A). See c. myrtiformes. c. mammilla'ris, the tuber olfactorium; the gray mass from which the middle root of the olfactory nerve arises, c. myrtifor'mes, small elevations surrounding the vaginal orifice, supposed to be relics of the ruptured hymen. C. saliva ris. c. sublingua lis [B N A], a little eminence on each side of the frenum of the tongue, at the apex of which is the opening of the duct of the sublingual gland.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caruncula (kar-ung'ku-lah) [L. a small fleshy mass.] Caruncle, c. hymena'lis (pi. caruncula hymenales) [BNA], c. myrtiformis, one of the numerous tabs or projections surrounding the orifice of the vagina after rupture of the hymen, c. lacrima'lis, a small reddish body at the inner canthus of the eye, containing modified sebaceous and sweat glands, c. ma'jor of Santori'ni, papilla duodeni. c. mamilla'ris, the collection of gray matter giving origin to part of the olfactory nerve, tuberculum olfactorium. c. Horgagn'ii, the middle lobe of the prostate gland. c. myr:jf.,r'mis (pi. caruncula myrtiformes), c. hymenalis [BNA]. c. saliva'ris, c. sublingual c. Gublingua'lii, a papilla on each side of the frenulum linguae marking the opening of the submaxillary (Wharton's) duct.
  28. caryocinesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryocinesis (fcar-e-o-sinV-jti). See karyokineris.
  29. caryolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryolysis (kor-c-ol'-is-is). See karyolysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      caryolysis (kar-I-ol'i-sis) [G. karyon, nut (nucleus), + lysis, solution.] Apparent destruction of the nucleus, at least the loss of affinity of its chromatin for basic dyes; chromatolysis.
  30. caryophyllus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caryophyllus (kar-e-o-fl'-us) ',..',,„-.«•. a nut: Eugenia aromatica, distinguished by the'r pungent, spicy taste. Its pronei ties are due to a volatile oil. which is antiseptic, stimulant, and irritant. It also contains a crystalline body, eugenin, CioHiiOi, and a camphor, caryophyllin, CioHnO. It is useful as a stomachic and to prevent "griping" when combined with purgatives. caryophyUi, infusum (B. P.), a strength of i to 40 is recommended. Dose 1-2 oz. (30-60 Cc.). CJiryophyUi, oleum (U. S. P.), oil of cloves, contains an acid and a phenol compound. Dose 1-4 min. (o.ofr-o.24 Cc.). It is used also by microscopists to clarify preparations and tissues for mounting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caryophyllus (kaK'e-o-fil'us) [Gr. xapvov nut + ifbWov leaf]. Latin for clove.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      caryophyllus (ka-ry-o-fil'us). The dried flower buds of Eugenia ar&malica. oleum caryophylli. Oil of cloves. A volatile oil distilled from caryophillus. It is carminative and mildly antiseptic. Caryophyllum [Br. Ph.]. Cloves [Gr., karyon, nut -f- phyllon, leaf.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caryophyllus (kar['e-o-fil'us) [Gr. itapvov nut -fleaf]- Latin for clove.
  31. casease - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      casease (ka'-se-as). An enzyme which digests casein, found by Duclaux and produced by bacteria, notably Tyrothrix tenuis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      casease (ka'se-Ss) [L. ca'seus cheese]. A ferment derived from bacterial cultures, capable of dissolving albumin and the casein of milk and cheese.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      casease (ka'se-as) [L. ca'seus cheese]. A ferment derived from bacterial cultures, capable of dissolving albumin and the casein of milk and cheese.
  32. cataleptoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cataleptoid (kat-al-ep'-toid) [catalepsy; tl&ot. likeness], IJlce catalepsy, c. state, a condition due to neuromuscular excitability and differing from true catalepsy in that the limbs must""be held in fixed attitudes for a few seconds before they maintain themselves and friction causes them to become limp.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cataleptoid (kat-al-ep'toid). Resembling catalepsy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      catalep'toid [G. eidos, resemblance.] Simulating or resembling catalepsy.
  33. cathisophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cathisophobia (kath-is-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. ,.n'h,;tiy to sit down + ipiflos fear). See akathisia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cathisophobia (kath-is-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. xadiftti> to sit down -I V'i'^m fear]. See akalhisia,
  34. caudatum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      caudatum (kaw-da'-tum). See corpus striatum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      caudatum (kaw-da'tum) [LJ. The nucleus caudatus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      caudatum (kaw-da'tum) [L.]. The nucleus caudatus.
  35. cavernoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cavernoma (kav-er-no'mah), pi. caternomaHa. Cavernous angioma; a vascular tumor with large blood-filled spaces, c. lymphat'icum. Same as lymphangioma caternosum.
  36. cavum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cavum (ka'-vum) [L,]. Any hollow or cavity, normal or pathological, c. abdominis, the cavity of the abdomen, c. articulare, joint cavity, c. conchas, the deepest part of the concave surface of the concha, c. dentis, the pulp-cavity of a tooth, c. epidurale, epidural cavity, c. luryngis, cavity of larynx, c. Meckelii. See Meckel's canty, c. mediastinale anterius, anterior mediastinal cavity, c. mediastinale posterius, posterior mediastinal cavity. c. medullare, the medullary canal of bones, c. nasi, nasal cavity, c. oris proprius, the cavity of the mouth proper, c. pelvis, pelvic cavity, c. pericardii, the pericardia! cavity, c. peritona'i, the peritoneal cavity, c. pharyngis, cavity of pharynx, c. pleurae, the pleural cavity, c. Retzii. See Retzius's space, c. septj, th« embryonal fifth ventricle of the brain. c. septi pellucidi, cavity of septum pellucidum, the fifth ventricle, c. subarachnoideale, the subarachnoid space, c. fhoracis, thoracic cavity, c. subdurale, the subdural space, the interval between the dura mater and the arachnoid, c. thoracis, thoracic cavity, c. tympani, the tympanic cavity. c. uteri, the cavity of the uterus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cavum (ka'vum) [L. "a hollow"]. Any open space or cavity. C. abdpm'inis |H N A], the abdominal cavity, c. articula're (B N A], a joint cavity, c. con'chn [B N A), the cavity of the concha, c. epidura'le [B N A], the epidural cavity, c. meck'lii, Meckel's cavity, c. mediastina le ante ring [B N A], the anterior mediastinum, c. mediastina'le poste'rius [B N A], the posterior mediastinum, c. medulla're, the medullary cavity of a bone. c. na'si [B N A], the nasal fossa. C. o'ris [B N A], the cavity or hollow of the mouth, c. pel via [B N A), the pelvic cavity. C. peritonse'i [B N A], peritoneal cavity. C. plu'rre [B N A], the pleura] cavity. C. ret'isii, the space formed when the fold of the peritoneum in front of the bladder is raised by distention of the bladder, c. sep'ti pellu'cidi [B N A], the fifth ventricle, c. subarachnoida'le |B N A|, the subarachnoid space, c. subdura'le [B N A), the subdural space, c. thora'cis [B N Aj, the thoracic cavity, c. tym'pani [B N A], the cavity of the tympanum, c. u'tari [B N A|, the uterine cavity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ca'vum [L.] A hollow, hole, or cavity, c. abdomina'le, c. abdom'inis, the abdominal cavity. c. articula're, a joint cavity, c. con'chte, cavity of the concha, the lower, larger, portion of the concha below the crus helicis; it forms the vestibule to the external auditory meatus. c. Doug'lasi, excavatio rectouterina [BNA]. c. epidura'le, epidural cavity, the space between the walls of the spinal canal and the dura mater of the cord. c. mediastina'le, mediastinum. c. m. ante'rius [BNA], anterior mediastinum. c. m. poste'rius [BNA], posterior mediastinum. c. o'ris, cavity of the mouth, the space between the dental arches, limited posteriorly by the isthmus of the fauces, c. pel'vis, the pelvic cavity, c. pcritonee'i, peritoneal cavity, the interior of the sac formed by the parietal layer of the peritoneum, containing all the abdominal organs except the kidneys, c. pleu'ree [BNA], pleural cavity, c. Ret'zii, preperitoneal space,
  37. cedrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cedrin (st'-drin) [cedrus, cedar]. A bitter crystalline substance obtained from cedron.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cedrin (se'drin). A bitter principle, in yellow crystals, from the seeds of Sima'ba ce'dron: febrifuge
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cedrin (se'drin). A bitter principle, in yellow crystals, from the seeds of .s'.-»m'(chiton; febrifuge.
  38. celation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      celation (sel-a'-shun) [ce olio, a hiding]. The concealment of illness, of a birth, or of piegnancy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      celation (se-la'shun) [L. cela're to conceal]. The concealing of pregnancy or of the birth of a child.
  39. cellon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellon (sel'on). Acetylene tetrachlorid, CHC CHClj, or tetrachlorethane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellon (sel'on). Acetylene tetrachlorid, CHCls.CHClj, or tetrachlorethane.
  40. cellophan - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellophan (scl'o-fan). A cellulose product: used in a filtering medium, and for bandages, compres: etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellophan (sel'o-fan). A cellulose product: used as a filtering medium, and for bandages, compresses, etc.
  41. cellose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cellose (sel'&s). A substance formed by the hyd ysis of cellulose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellose (scl'os). A substance formed by the hydrolysis of cellulose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cell'ose. A product of the hydrolysis of cellulose.
  42. cellulosity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cellulosity (sel-u-los'-e-te). The condition of being cellular.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cellulosity (sel-u-los'it-e). The condition of being composed of cells.
  43. celology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      celology (sd-ol'-o-je) MXi>. hernia; XAyoi, science). That branch of surgical science that treats of hernia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      celology (se-lol'o-je) [Gr. ic^X>) hernia + XA^-oj treatise]. The science or study of hernia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      celol'ogy [G. kill, hernia, + -logia.] The branch of surgery which has to do with hernia.
  44. cenophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cenophobia. See xenophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cenophobia (sen-o-fo'be-ah). Same as kenophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenophobia (sen-o-fo'be-ah). Same as kmophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cenopho'bia [G. kenos, empty, + phobos, fear.] A morbid dread of being in an open space, agoraphobia.
  45. cenosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cenosis (sen-o'-sis) [xiybwn, a draining), i. Evacuation; apocenosis. 2. Inanition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenosis (se-no'sis) [Gr.]. A morbid discharge.
  46. cenosite - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cenosite (se'no-slt) [Gr. Kolvm common + o-frot food]. A parasite which is able to live apart from its host.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cenosite (se'no-slt) [Gr. toivtn common -f ctlrot food]. A parasite which is able to live apart from its host.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cenosite (se'no-sit) [G. koinos, common, + silos, food.] A facultative commensal organism; one which can sustain itself apart from its usual host. censor (sen'sor) [L. censere, to value, judge.] The psychic barrier which prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
  47. centa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centa. mazamorra (maz-am-o'rah). Ground-itch. See
  48. centaurium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centaurium (sen-taw're-um). Centaury.
  49. centinormal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      centinormal (sen-le-nor'-maT) [centi-; norms, normal]. The Tffv of the normal; applied to a solution the yi, of the strength of a normal solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centinormal (sen-tin-or'mal) [L. cen'tum hundred + nor'ma rule]. Having jj0 part of the normal or standard strength.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centinormal (sen-tin-or'mal) [L. cen'tum hundred 4- nor'ma rule]. Having jjj part of the normal or standard strength.
  50. centrifugalization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      centrifugalization (sen"trif-u-gal-iz-a'shun) [see centrifuge]. The process of separating the more solid portions of a liquid from the more fluid ones by centrifugal force.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      centrifugalization (sen"trif-u-gal-iz-a'shun) [see i'-i:iri:ni'i\. The process of separating the more solid portions of a liquid from the more fluid ones by centrifugal force.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      centrifugaliza'tion. The sedimentation of solids suspended in a fluid, by means of the centrifuge. rentrif ugahze. To submit to rapid rotary action
  51. ceptor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceptor (sep'-lor) [capere, to take]. A term suggested by Ehrlich in place of intermediary body. According to the manner of action he distinguishes uniceplors and amboceptors.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceptor (sep'tor). i. See Ehrlich's side-chain theory under theory. 2. Any one of the nervous apparatus for, or organs which, receive external stimuli or impressions and transfer them to the nerve-centers. Cf. beneceptor and nociceptor. chemical c., a ceptor which transforms proper stimuli into chemical reactions in the body, contact C., a ceptor which receives stimuli of direct physical contact, distance c., the nervous apparatus through which an individual perceives or is affected by his distant environment, effector C., a ceptor in the brain which receives impulses of special actions and becomes so trained for them that subsequent similar impulses are much facilitated, nerve c. Same as ceptor, 2d def.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cep'tor [L. caperc. to take.] i. In Ehrlich's theory of immunity, a receptor which has been thrown
  52. ceral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceral (se'-raT). Pasta cerata. a proprietary vehicle for application of medicaments, said to consist of wax, potash, and water.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceral (se'ral) [L. ce'ra wax]. Pasta cerata, a proprietary vehicle for the external application of medicines: it contains wax, potash, and water.
  53. cerasus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerasus (ser'as-us). Latin for cherry or cherry tree. See Prunus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'asus [L.] Cherry: see prunus.
  54. ceratin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceratin («r'-keratin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratin (ser'ah-tin). Same as keratin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratin (ser'ah-tin). Same as keratin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cer'atin. Keratin.
  55. ceratine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratine (ser'at-en). A proprietary ointment for skin diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratine (ser/at-€n). A proprietary ointment for skin diseases.
  56. ceratum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ceratum (se-ra'tum). Latin for cerate. See cerate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceratum (se-ra'tum). Latin for cerate. See cerate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cera'tum [L. ceratus, waxed.] Cerate, an unctuous solid preparation, harder than an ointment, containing sufficient wax to prevent it from melting when applied to the skin. The U.S.P. ceratum, simple cerate, contains white wax 30, white petrolatum 30, benzoinated lard 50. c. calami'nje, Turner's cerate, calamine and yellow wax, of each 15, olive oil 40, application for burns, c. campho'rrp, camphor cerate; contains camphor liniment 10, white wax 35, white petrolatum 15, benzoinated lard, 40. c. campho'rae compos'Itum, compound camphor cerate, camphor ice; camphor 10.7, benzoic acid I, phenol 0.2, oil of bitter almond o.i, in a firm mixture of white wax, spermaceti, and castor oil to make 100; antiseptic and protective application for chapped lips, hands, etc. c. canthar'idis, cantharides cerate, contains cantharides 32, yellow wax 18, rosin 18, lard 17, liquid petrolatum 13; used locally as an epispastic. c. ceta'cei, spermaceti cerate, contains spermaceti 10, white wax 35, olive oil 55. c. fla'vura, yellow cerate, a mixture of yellow wax 10, oil of sweet almond 35, water 25. c. gale'ni, cold cream, unguentum* aqtue rosae. c. iodofor'mi, iodoform cerate, equal parts of iodoform and hard paraffin, c. petro'lei, soft white paraffin 2, hard paraffin i. c. plum'bi subaceta'tis, cerate of lead subacetate, Goulard's cerate, contains solution of lead subacetate 30, wool-fat 20, paraffin 20, white petrolatum 38, camphor a. c. resi'nrfi, rosin cerate, basilicon ointment; contains rosin 35, yellow wax 15, lard 50. c. lesi'na compos'itum (N.P.), compound rosin cerate. Deshler's salve; contains rosin 23.5, yellow wax 22.5. prepared suet 30, turpentine 11.5, Unseed oil 13.5.
  57. cerebellospinal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebellospinal (scr"e-bel-o-spi'nal). Pertaining to the cerebellum and spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cerebellospi'nal. Relating to the cerebellum and the spinal cord.
  58. cerebrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cerebrol (ser'-e-brot) [cerebrum, brain; oleum, oil]. An oily, reddish fluid obtainable from brain-tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cerebrol (ser'eb-rol). An oily substance from the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cerebrol (ser'eb-rol). An oily substance from the brain.
  59. ceromel - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ceromel (se'-ro-mel) [cera,f wax; mel, honey]. Honey cerate; wax, one pait; honey, two or four parts. It 13 applied to wounds and ulcers, chiefly in Asiatic countries.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ceromel (se'ro-mel) [L. ce'ra wax + met honey], A mixture of wax and honey: sometimes used as a cerate and wound dressing.
  60. cestrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ces'trum. Estrus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ces'trum. Estrus.
  61. cevadilla - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'-ah). See sabadilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'ah). Same as sabadilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cevadilla (sev-ad-il'ah). Same as sabadiUa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cevadil'la [Sp. dim. of cebada, barley.] Sabadilla.
  62. chalcosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chalcosis (in/-io'-ji'j) [x«X«4i. copper]. A deposit of copper particles in the tissues, chalice-tell (r*ol'-».0. Goblet cell, chalicosis (kol-ik-o'-sis) [xi^»f. gravel]. A disease of the lungs caused by the inhalation of dust or sand, challnoplasty (kal-in-o-plos'-te) [xaXirfe. a bridle or rein; irX4»» i». to form]. An operation to form a new f renum of the tongue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chalcosis (kal-ko'sis) [Gr. p^aXico; copper]. The presence of copper deposits in the tissues.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chalcosis (kal-ko'sis) [G. chalkos, copper.] i. Chronic copper poisoning, a. A deposit of fine particles of copper in the lungs or other parts.
  63. chancroidal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chancroidal (shang-kroi'-dal). Pertaining to or of the nature of a chancroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chancroidal (shang-kroi'dal). Pertaining to chancroid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chancroid'al. Relating to or of the nature of
  64. chartula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      char'tula. A little paper; in prescriptions, a powder, i. e., a paper containing a medicine in the form of powder, usually a single dose. c. eerata. A powder wrapped in wax paper. [Lat. dim. of r/uzr/a.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chartula (kart'u-lah), pi. charfida [L. dim. of char'la paper). A small piece of paper, as for containing a dose of a medicinal powder.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chartula (kar'tu-lah) [L. dim. of charta, paper.] Charta (a).
  65. chenopodium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chenopodium (ken-o-po'-de-um) [xV. a goose; TMiof. a little foot]. American wormseed; the fruit of C. ambrosioides. or anlhelminticum, a plant native to the United States, with properties due to a volatile oil, which is the only preparation used. It is an efficient anthelmintic apainst the roundworm. c., oil of (nleitm chenopodii, U. S. P.). Dose 5-15 min. (0.32-1.0 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chenopodium (ke-no-po'dl-um) [G. chin, goose, + fous(fod-), foot.] The dried ripe fruit of Chenopodium ambrosioides, American wormseed, Mexican tea, Jesuit tea; anthelmintic in dose of gr. 10 (1.3), or of 3 ounces (60.0) of a decoction of an ounce to the pint.
  66. chimaphila - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chimaphila (ki-maf-il-ah) (x«iia. winter; #Xoi. loving]. Pipsissewa; prince's-pine; the leaves of C. umbeHoto, an evergreen found in the United States, an astringent tonic and excellent diuretic. The bruised leaves are used as a rubefacient. It is valuable in dropsy, in renal disease, and in affections of the urinary passages, c., decoction of (deaxlum ckimapUla, B. P.). Dose 1-3 oz. (3O- Cc.). e., flaideitract of yiuidtxtractum chimaphila, U. S. P.). Dose \-i dr. (2-8 Cc.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chimaphila (kim-af'e-lah) [G. cheima. winter, + philos, loving.] (N.F.) The dried leaves of Chimaphila umbellata, pipsissewa, Prince's pine; diuretic and alterative, in doses of gr. 15—30 (1.0-2.0).
  67. chinosol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chinosol (kin'-o-sot). See quinosol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chinosol (ki'no-sol). A yellow powder. C,H,,N.OSOjK + H,O; oxyquinolin potassium sulphonate: antiseptic, antipyretic, astringent, and styptic. It is used externally in solutions of from i: 5000 to i: 500; internally, dose, 1-5 gr. (0.06-0.3 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chinosol (kin'o-sol). Quinosol, oxychinolin potassium sulphate, a yellow crystalline powder; antiseptic and disinfectant in solutions of 1-2000 to i-ioo, and employed in 5 per cent, solution to preserve anatomical specimens.
  68. chiralgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chiralgia (ki-ral'-je-ah). See chiragra.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chiralgia (ki-ral'je-ah). Same as ckiragra.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chiral'gia (ki-ral'jl-ah) [G. cheir, hand. + algos, pain]. Pain, especially nontraumatic or neuralgic pain, in the hand.
  69. chlorazol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chlorazol (klrf-rat-alt. A highly toxic, oily liquid, obtained from albumin, glutin, or dried muscle by action of strong nitric and hydrochloric acids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chlorazol (klo'ra-zol). A highly poisonous, oily
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chlorazol (klo'ra-zol). A highly poisonous, oily liquid obtained by treating albumin, glutin, or dried muscle with nitric and hydrochloric acids.
  70. chloretone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chloretone (klo're-KSn) [chloroform + acetone A white, crystalline compound, CCl,(CHj)-C.Or having a camphoraceous odor, formed when caust potash is added to equal weights of acetone an chloroform. It is sparingly soluble in water, bi very soluble in chloroform, alcohol, and elhe It is a local anesthetic and internally a hypnoti antiseptic, and antinauseant: used in seasicknes Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.333-1.333 gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloretone (klo're-t6n) [chloroform + acetone]. A white, crystalline compound, CCWCHJjC.OH, having a camphoraceous odor, formed when caustic potash is added to equal weights of'acetone and chloroform. It is sparingly soluble in water, but very soluble in chloroform, alcohol. an* *tnerIt is a local anesthetic and internally a hypnotic, antiseptic, and antinauscant: used in seasickness. Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.333-1.333 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chloretone (klo're-ton). Acetone-chloroform, tertiary trichlorbutyl-alcohol, C^rChO, -occurring in white crystals of camphor-like odor and taste; hypnotic, sedative, and local anesthetic in doses of gr. 5-20 (0.3-1.3).
  71. chloroquinone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chloroquinone (Ho-ro-fewi'w'-fin) Any chlorine substitution-compound of quinone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chloroquinone (klo-ro-kwin'Sn). Any one of a series of compounds formed by the action of chlorin on quinone.
  72. choledoch - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choledoch (kol'-e-dok) [chokdochus]. i. Conducting bile. 2. A bile-duct. 3. The common bileduct.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choledoch (ko'le-dok). Choledochus. c. duct, ductus choledochus.
  73. choledochus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choledochus (kol-ed'-o^us) [xoXij, bile; 64x e0 u, to receive]. Receiving or holding bilr. c., ductus communis, the common excretory duct of the liver and gall-bladder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choledochus (ko-led'o-kus) [Gr. •,..Arj bile + otxvSai to receive]. The ductus choledochus, or common bile-duct.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choledochus (ko-led'o-kus) [G. chole, bile, + dochos, containing; dechomai, I receive.] The common bile-duct, ductus* choledochus.
  74. choreoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      choreoid (ko'-re-oid) [x°f»'a, dancing; <Uoi, like]. Pertaining or similar to chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choreoid (ko're-oid). Resembling chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choreoid (ko're-oid). Resembling chorea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choreoid (ko're-oyd) [G. eidos, resemblance.] Choreiform, resembling chorea.
  75. choreomania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      choreomania (ko"re-o-ma'ne-ah) [Gr. xop«fa dance + fjavia madness]. Dancing mama, or epidemic chorea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      choreomania (ko"re-0rma'ne-ah) [Gr. -xpptla dance + parla madness]. Dancing mania, or epidemic chorea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      choreomania (ko-re-o-ma'nl-ah). Epidemic chorea, choromania, the dancing mania of the middle ages.
  76. chorial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chorial (ko'-re-af) [x&pto*, skin]. Chorionic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chorial (ko're-al). Of or relating to the chorion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chorial (ko're-al). Of or relating to the chorion.
  77. chorioid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chorioid (ko'-re-oid}. See choroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      chorioid (ko're-oid). The more correct form of the word choroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chorioid (ko're-oid). The more correct form of the word choroid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chorioid (ko-rl-oyd). Choroid. i. Resembling-is) Ichromalo-; X6»«. a loosing], i. Flemming's term for the breakingdown of the nucleus at the death of the cell. Syn., karyolysis. i. The disintegration and disappearance of the Nissl granules from nerve-cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromatolysis (kro-ma-tol'i-sis) [chromatin + G. lysis, solution.] i. Destruction of the chromatin, or at least loss of its affinity for the basic dyes, in cloudy swelling and other forms of cellular degeneration; caryolysis, nuclear solution, hypochromatosis. 2. Lysis of the body of a bacterial or other cell, leaving the empty cell membrane, chro'matolysm. Atrophy or shrinkage of Niessl's
  78. chromicize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromicize (kro'-mis-tz). To impregnate with chromic acid or a chromium salt.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chromicize (kro'mis-Iz). To treat with a chromium compound.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chro'micize. To mix with a chromium salt.
  79. chromidium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromidium (kro-mid'-e-um). Any one of the granules of nuclear substance found in the cytoplasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromidium (kro-midl-um) [G. chroma, color, + -idion, a diminutive termination.] i. The central chromatic structure of the blood-platelet. 2. See the plural, chromidia.
  80. chromometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chromometer (kro-mom'-rt-ur}. See chromatometer (2).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      chromom'eter. Chromatometer.
  81. chylopoietic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      chylopoietic (ki-lo-poi-et'-ik) [see chylopoiesis]. Making or forming chyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      chylopoietic (ki"lo-poi-et'ik). Concerned in the formation of chyle.
  82. cicutine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cicutine (sik'-u-len) [ciaita. hemlock), i. An alkaloid obtained from Cicuta virosa. 2. The same as coniine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cic'utine. A volatile alkaloid, resembling or identical with coniine, present in water-hemlock, Cicuta virosa.
  83. cimicifugin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cimicifugin (sim-is-iFu-jin). A resinous concentration from cimicifuga: antispasmodic, narcotic, diaphoretic. Dose, 1-3 gr. (0.06-0.10 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cimicifugin (sim-l-sif'u-jin). Macrotih, a yellowish brown resinoid body, the active principle of cimicifuga; tonic and antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1-6 (0.06-0.4).
  84. cionotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cionotome (si-on'-o-t6m) [utan, the uvula; rop4. a cutting]. An instrument for cutting off the uvula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cionotome (si'on-o-tom) [G. kion, uvula, + tomi, cutting.] An instrument for cutting off part or all of the uvula.
  85. cionotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cionotomy (si-o-not'o-me) [Gr. nluv uvula + riftmv to cut]. The surgical removal of a part of the uvula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cionot'omy. Cutting off a part of the uvula.
  86. circuminsular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      circuminsular (sir-kitm-in'-su-lar) [circum-; insuUi. island]. Surrounding the island of Keil.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      circuminsular (scr-kum-in'su-lar) [L. cir'cum around + in'sula island]. Surrounding, situated, or occurring about the island of Reil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      circumin'sular. Situated around the island of Reil.
  87. circumscriptus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      circumscriptus (ser-kum-skrip'tus). Circumscribed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      circumscriptus (sur-kum-skrip'tus) [L. circum, around, + scribere, to write.] Circumscribed.
  88. clasmatocyte - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clasmatocyte (klos-mal'-o-slt) [xXdffpa, fragment; jcftrof, cell]. A form of very large connective-tissue corpuscles that tend to break up into granules or pieces. '
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clasmatocyte (klaz-mat'o-sit) [Gr. ..v'm.in piece broken off + /ctrot cell). A large connective-tissue cell which shows a tendency to divide into pieces.
  89. cleidotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cleidotomy (kli-dot'-p-me) [cleido-; rkiana, to cut]. The operation of dividing the clavicles in cases of < 1 mie : 1 1 1 1 abor due to the broad shoulders of the child.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleidotomy (kli-dot'o-mc) [Gr. xXeis clavicle + Tom'? cut]. The operation of dividing the clavicle of the child in difficult labor, in order to permit of the passage of the shoulders.
  90. cleptophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cleptophobia (klep-to-fo'-be-ah). See kleptophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cleptophobia (klep-to-fo'be-ah). See klcptophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cleptopho'bia [G. klepto, I steal, + phobos, fear.] A morbid dread of becoming a thief or a cleptomaniac.
  91. clinology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clinology (kli-nol'o-je) [Gr. < ,W. «• decline + Xo7oj discourse). The science of the decline or retrogression of an animal organism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clinology (kli-nol'o-jl) [G. klino, I decline, + -logia. The part of science which has to deal with the retrograde changes in living organisms following the period of maturity.
  92. clithrophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clithrophobia (klith-ro-pho'W-ah) [G. kleithron.a. bolt, + phobos, fear.] Morbid dread of being locked in.
  93. clitoridotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      clitoridotomy (kli-tor-id-otVme) [clitoris + Gr. jn/.nj a cut]. Female circumcision.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clitoridotomy (klit-or-I-dot'o-ml) [G. kleiloris(kleitorid-), clitoris, + tome, a cutting.] Circumcision in the female.
  94. clonism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clo'nism. A long continued state of clonic spasms.
  95. clunes - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clunes (klu'->tiz) [pi. of .::,•:,. buttock]. The buttocks, nates.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clu'nes [pi. of L. clunis, buttock.] Nates, buttocks.
  96. clysma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      clysma (Mis'-majt). See clyster.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clys'ma [G. klysma, a drenching.] An enema or clyster.
  97. clysterize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      clys'terize. To administer a rectal injection.
  98. cnicin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cnicin (nl'-iin) [»H)«w, a plant of the thistle kind), GiHtfOu. A crystalline bitter substance found In GiiViis btnedictus. Blessed thistle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cnicin (ni'sin). The bitter principle of carduus, Cnicus benedictus; dose, gr. 5 (o. 3).
  99. co-enzyme - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      co-enzyme (£o-en'-s!m). A substance whose presence is essential for the due activity of a certain enzyme.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      co-enzyme (ko-en'zim). Activator(i).
  100. coccal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coccal (kak'-al) [coccus]. Relating to cocci.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coc'cal. Relating to cocci.
  101. cochleare - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cochleare (kok-le-ah're). A spoon; among various medical authors, a measure varying from yj dr. to J4 fl. oz. c. magnum. A tablespoon, holding about 16 c.c. c. minimum. A teaspoon, holding about 5 c.c. [Gr., kochliarion.] Cochlearla (kok-le-ah're-ah). A genus of cruciferous plants. C. armoracla. The horse radish. C. pfllclmilis. Common scurvy grass. It is stimulant, aperient, and diuretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cochleare (kok-le-a're). L. for" spoon " or " spoonful." C. am'plum, "large spoon"; a tablespoonful. C. mag'num, tablespoon or tablespoonful: abbreviated to cochl. mag. c. medium, dessertspoon or dessertspoonful; literally, middle-sized spoon: abbreviated to cochl. med. C. par vuru, a teaspoon
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cochleare (kok-le-a're) [L.] A spoon, c. nm plum, c. mag'num, large spoon, tablespoon, c. me'dium, medium-sized spoon, dessertspoon, c. jmr'vum, small spoon, teaspoon.
  102. codamine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      codamine (ko1-dam-in) [«M«a. poppy-head: «i«], C»H»NOt. A crystalline alkaloid of opium, isomeric with laudanine. When ferric chloride uadded to it, it assumes a deep-green color.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      co'damine. An alkaloid, C^l^NO,, derived from the mother liquor of morphine, isomeric with laudanine; occurring in hexagonal crystals.
  103. coko - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coko (ko'ko). A Fijian disease resembling yaws.
  104. coliplication - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coliplication (ko-lip-lik-a'shun). Complication.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coliplication (ko-11-pli-ka'shun) [colon + plication.]
  105. collagenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      collagenic (kol-a-jen'-tk). Forming or producing collagen or gelatin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      collagenic (kol-a-jcn'ik). Forming or producing collagen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      collagen'ic. Producing gelatin, noting the tissues containing collagen.
  106. colliform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colliform (kol'-if-arm). A proprietary preparation containing formaldehyde and gelatin; used as a dressing for wounds.
  107. colloidin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colloidin (kat-oid'-in) [colloid], CtHiiNOs. A jelly, like substance obtained from colloid tissue.
  108. colpeurynter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colpeurynter (kol-pu-rin'-ter) \*t>\-m. vagina; •tpvrur, to widen]. An inflatable bag or sac used for dilating the vagina.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      colpeurynter (Icol'pu-rin-ter). A rubber bag for distending the vagina. [Gr, Itolpos, vagina, + eurynein, to dilate.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colpeurynter (kol"pu-rin'ter) [G. kolpos, sinus (vagina), + etiryno, I dilate.] A bag introduced empty into the vagina and then filled with water, used for dilating the canal.
  109. colpitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      colpitis (kol-pi'-lis) [«6Xrof, vagina; irtt, inflammation]. Inflammation of the vagina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      colpitis (kol-pi'(pe')tis) [G. kolpos, sinus (vagina),
  110. commotio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      commotio (kom-o'-ski-o) [L.]. A concussion, commotion or shock, c. cerebri, concussion of the brain, c. retime, concussion or paralysis of the retina from a blow on or near the eye. It is characterized by sudden blindness, but there is little or no pphthalmoscopic evidence of any lesion. The sight is usually regained, and its loss is supposedly due to disturbance of the retinal elements, c. spinalis, railway spine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      commotio (kom-o'she-o) [L. "disturbance"]. A concussion; a violent shaking, or the shock which results from it. c. cer'ebri, concussion of the brain, c. ret'uue, impairment of vision following a blow on or near the eye. c. spina'lia, concussion of the spine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      commotio (kfi-mo'shyo) [L. commovere, to agitate.] Concussion, c. cer'ebri, concussion of the brain, a disturbance of the brain tissue caused by a blow on the head or a violent shaking, marked by nausea and vertigo followed by coma, with slow respiration and weak pulse, c. refine, a disturbance in retinal function, i.e. of vision, following a blow on the eyeball or a violent shaking of the head.
  111. communicans - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      communicans (kom-u'nik-anz) [L. " communicating"). A communicating nerve. See tatle of tunes, under nene.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      commu'nicans [L. communicating.] One of a number of nerves; see under nervus.
  112. conarial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conarial (ko-na'-re-al} [curipw, the pineal gland}. Relating to the conarium. c. vein. See rein.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conarial (ko-na're-al). Pertaining to the conarium.
  113. concassation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      concassation (kon-kas-a'-shun) [concassatio; con, together: cassare or quassare, to shake to beat].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      concassation (kon-kas-a'shun). The act of breaking up roots or woods into small pieces in order that their active principles may be more easily extracted by solvents. „
  114. conchitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conchitis (kong-ki'-tis) [xfrrxTj, a shell; Itu, inflammation]. Inflammation of the concha.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conchitis (kong-ki'tis). An inflammation of the concha.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchitis (kong-ki'(ke')tis). Inflammation of any concha.
  115. conchoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conchoscope (kong'-ko-skop) [concha; »«nr«I», to inspect]. A speculum and mirror for inspecting the nasal cavity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchoscope (kongTco-skOp) [L. concha + G. skopto, I view.] A form of nasal speculum.
  116. conchotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conchotome (kong'ko-t6m) [Gr. tbyxn 5.neU + roni a cutl- An instrument for the surgical removal of the turbinate bones.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conchotome (kong'ko-tom) [L. concha, turbinated bone, + G. tome, incision.] A knife used in removing the whole or a part of a turbinated body
  117. condurangin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condurangin (knn~du-ranf-jin) [condurango]. A mixture of glucosides from condurango bark, occurring as an amorphous yellow powder of an aromatic bitter taste, soluble in water, alcohol, and chloroform. It is used as a stomachic and astringent in gastric cancer and chronic dyspepsia. Dose i1-. i gr. (0.006-0.016 Gm.) 3 times daily.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      condurangin (kon-du-rang'gin). Either of two poisonous glucosids from condurango.
  118. condylarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylarthrosis (kon-dil-ar-thro'-sis') [condyle; 608poi>t a joint). A form of diarthrosis wherein a condyle is set in a shallow and elliptic cavity and free and varied movement of the joint is possible; condylar articulation.
  119. condylectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylectomy (kon-dil-ek'-to-me) [condyle; A1-0/117, excision). Excision of a condyle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      condylectomy (kon-dil-ek'to-me) [condyle + Gr. torofi^ excision]. Surgical removal of a condyle.
  120. condylomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      condylomatous (kon-dil-o'-mat-us). Of the nature of a condyloma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      condylo'matous. Relating to a condyloma.
  121. confectio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      confectio (kon-fek'-she-o) [L.; gen., confectionis]. Official name for any confection, q. c. c. Damocratis. See milhridale.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      confectio (kon-fek'she-o) [L.]. See confection. C. o'pii, confection of opium; prepared from opium, aromatic powder, and honey: narcotic. Dose, 5-20 gr. (0.325-1.3 gm.). c. ro'ste, confection of rose; prepared from red-rose petals, sugar, rose-water, and honey: used as a vehicle. c. scammo'nii, confection of scammony; prepared with aromatics and honey: purgative. Dose, 10-30 gr. (0.666-2 gm.). c. sen'nse, confection of senna; a preparation of senna, cassia fistula, tamarind, coriander oil, prune, and fig: laxative. Dose, 2 dr. (8 gm.). C. sul'phuris, confection of sulphur: a laxative. Dose, 1-2 dr. (4-8 gm.). c. terebin'thinn, a carminative and styptic preparation of oil of turpentine. Dose, 1-2 dr. (4-8 gm.).
  122. confertus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      confertus (kon-fer'-lus) [confercire, to press close together]. Pressed together, dense, crowded; applied to cutaneous eruptions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      confertus (kon-fur'tus) [L. conferre, to bring together.] Arranged closely together; confluent, coalescing.
  123. coniosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coniosis (ko-ru-o'-sis). See koniosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coniosis (ko-ne-o'sis) [Gr. «A«s dust]. A diseased state caused by the inhalation of dust.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conio'sis [G. konis, dust.] Any disease or morbid condition caused by dust.
  124. conjunctivoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      conjunctivoma (kon-junk-tiv-o'-mah) [conjunctiva; Omci, tumor]. A tumor consisting of conjunctiva! tissue; it occurs on the eyelid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      conjunctivoma (kon-junk-tiv-o'mah). A tumor of the eyelid made up of conjunctiva! tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      conjunctivo'ma. A homeoplastic tumor of the conjunctiva.
  125. connectivum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      connectivum (kon-nek-ti'-i-um) [L.]. A connective tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      connectivum (kon-ek-ti'vum) [L.]. The connective tissue.
  126. consilia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      consilia (kon-sil'e-ah). Letters published by physicians of the isth to i?th centuries, outlining the semciology and treatment of diseases under their observation.
  127. contrastimulus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      contrastim'ulus. Contrastimulant(a).
  128. contrectation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      contrectation (kon-trtk-ta'-shun) [contrectatio; contreclare, to touch), i. Digital examination; palpation; touch; manipulation, as in massage. 2. The impulse to approach and caress a person of the opposite sex (H. Ellis.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      contrectation (kon-trek-ta'shun) [L. conlrtcta're to handle]. The fondling of a person of the opposite sex; "spooning" (Moll).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      contrectation (kon-trek-ta'shun) [L. contrectare, to handle.] I. Sexual dalliance. 2. The impulse to embrace one of the opposite sex.
  129. coprostasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coprostasis' (kop-ros'-tas-is) [copro-; vrtoru, a standing]. The accumulation of fecal matter in the bowel.
  130. cordyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cordyl (kor'-dil). See aceiyl tribromsalol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cor'dyl. Acetyltribromsalol.
  131. coreometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coreometer (kor-e-om'-et-er) [core (4); fiirpav, a measure]. An instrument for measuring the pupil of the eye.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coreometer (kor-e-om'e-ter) [G. kore, pupil, -fmelron, measure.] An instrument for measuring the width of the pupil.
  132. coretomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coretomy (kor-et'-o-me) [core (4); Tifww*-. to cut]. Iridotomy or iridectomy; any surgical cutting operation on the iris.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coret'omy [G. kore, pupil, + tome, incision.] Indotomy.
  133. coriamyrtin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coriamyrtin (kore-am-er'-tin) [Coriaria myrtifolia, myrtle], doHiiOio. An exceedingly poisonous principle, a glucoside, obtained from the fruit of Coriaria
  134. coriandrol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coriandrol (kor-e-an'-drol), CioHiip. The chief constituent of oil of coriander; a liquid isomeric with borneol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coriandrol (ko-re-an'drol). A fragrant, colorless liquid, (',, 11,,(i, from oil of coriander.
  135. corneitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corneitis (kor-ne-i'tis). Inflammation of the cor-nea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corneitis (kor-ne-i'(e')tis). Keratitis.
  136. corneum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corneum (kor-ne'-um). The stratum coraeum or horny layer of the skin,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cor'neum. The horny layer of the skin.
  137. cornual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cornual ikor'-nfi-al) [cornu}. Relating to a
  138. coronillin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coronillin (kor-o~nilr-in) [see coroniUa], A glucoside, C?HuOi, from CoroniUa scorpioides; it is a cardiac tonic and diuretic. Dose i-a gr. (0.06-0.13 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coronillin (kor-o-nil'in). A pale-yellow, bitter glucosid, C,HuOj, from the seeds of Corontt'la scorpioi'dcs, a European leguminous plant: a diuretic and heart stimulant. Dose, i-a gr. (0.06-0.13 Km.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      coron'illin. A glucoside from coronilla; dose, gr. i (0.06).
  139. coronitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coronitis (knr-o-ni'-tis). Inflammation of the coronary substance of the horse's hoof.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coronitis (kor-o-ni'tis). Inflammation of the coronary cushion of the horse.
  140. coroplasty - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      coroplasty (ko'-ro-plas-U). Same as coreplasty.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coroplasty (ko'ro-plas-te). Same as coreoplasly.
  141. corticifugal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ""corticifugal (kor-te-sif'-u-gar) [cortex; fugere, to flee] Conducting away from the cortex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corticifugal (kor-tis-ifu-gal) [L. cor'tex cortex •(Jvfgcrc to flee]. Proceeding, conducting, or moving away from the cortex.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corticifugal (kor-tl-sif'ugal) [L. cortex, rind, bark. + fugere, to flee.) Passing in a direction away from the outer surface, noting especially nerve fibers conveying impulses away from the brain cortex.
  142. corticipetal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      corticipetal (kar-te-sip'-et-al) [cortex; petere. to seek]. Conducting toward the cortex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      corticipetal (kor-tis-ip'et-al) [L. cor'tex cortex + pe'tere to seek]. Moving, progressing, or conducting toward the cortex.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      corticipetal (kor-tt-sip'e-tal) [L. cortex, rind, bark. + petere, to seek.] Passing in a direction toward the outer surface, noting especially nerve fibers conveying impulses toward the cerebral cortex.
  143. costosternal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      costoster'nal. Relating to the ribs and the sternum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cos"toster'nal. Pertaining to a rib or the ribs and to the sternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      costosternal (kos-to-ster'nal). Pertaining to a rib and to the sternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      costoster'nal. Relating to the ribs and the sternum.
  144. courap - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      courap (kocnrap'). A disease of the skin occurring in India, with eruption and itching of the armpits, groin, breast, and face.
  145. court-plaster - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      court-plaster (kort'-plas-ter). See plaster.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      court-plaster (kort'plas-tur). Thin silk coated with isinglass, used as a protective for slight cuts and abrasions.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      court-plaster (kort'plas-ter). A silk plaster spread
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      court-plaster (kort'plas-tur). Thin silk coated with isinglass, used as a protective for slight cuts and abrasions.
  146. coxofemoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cox"ofem'oral. Pertaining to the ilius and the femur.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      coxofemoral (koks-o-fem'or-al) [L. cox'a hip ijf'mur thigh]. Pertaining to the hip and thigh.
  147. crab-louse - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      crab-louse (krab'-lows). See Pediculus Pubis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      crab-louse. The Pediculus pubis.
  148. crachotement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      crachotement (kra-shot-mon(gy) [Fr.]. A peculiar reflex following operations upon the utero-ovarian organs, marked by a desire to spit, without the ability to do so. It is usually accompanied by a tendency to syncope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      crachotement (krah-shot-mawO [Fr.j. Inability to spit, even with a strong desire to do so.
  149. craniostenosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      craniostenosis (kra"nl-o-stg-no'sis) [G. kranion, skull, + stenosis, a narrowing.] A contraction of the cranial capacity or narrowing of its foramina by exostoses.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      craniostenosis (kra"nl-o-stg-no'sis) [G. kranion, skull, + stenosis, a narrowing.] A contraction of the cranial capacity or narrowing of its foramina by exostoses.
  150. craw-craw - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      craw-craw (kraw'-kraw). A variety of filariasis: see filaria sanguinis hominis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      craw-craw. A term applied in West Africa to a vesiculopustular skin eruption, attended with itching. In some cases embryos of Filaria ptrstans have been found in the vesicles, but they are not usually recognized as the cause of the disease which is regarded by most authorities as simply a pustular eczema. The name has also been given to papular and pustular eruptions in the French Congo and on the Cameroon Coast.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      craw-craw (kraw'kraw). An obstinate form of eczema occurring in West Africa, and affecting chiefly the thighs and genitals, though it may spread over the whole body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      craw-craw. A term applied in West Africa to a vesiculopustular skin eruption, attended with itching. In some cases embryos of Filaria ptrstans have been found in the vesicles, but they are not usually recognized as the cause of the disease which is regarded by most authorities as simply a pustular eczema. The name has also been given to papular and pustular eruptions in the French Congo and on the Cameroon Coast.
  151. cresylate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cresylate (feres'-il-&t). Any compound of cresol with a metallic radical.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cresylate (kres'I-lat). A salt of cresylic acid, or cresol.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cresylate. An antiseptic, s. diethylbarbituratc. (Na(CHuOsNii); its actions are the same as those of veronal, but it is more soluble, s. diiodosalicylate. Analgetic, antipyretic, and antiseptic. 8. dlthiosallcylate. A compound of s. salicylate and sulphur. Two such compounds exist, distinguished as i and ii. Salt ii, a compound of 2 atoms of sulphur and 2 molecules of s. salicylate, is a grayish white, hygroscopic powder, very soluble in water. It has been recommended in rheumatism and as an antiseptic. 8. ethylatc. Syn.: caustic soda. CH«CH*ONa; used as a caustic, s. ethylsulpluitc. The compound NaCaHaSOi-lH2O, used as a purgative, s. liuorid. "Fluorol," an antiseptic, s. glyccroboratc. An antiseptic obtained by heating together equal parts of glycerin and s. borate, s. glycerophosphate. Used like glycerophosphoric acid. s. glyeocholate. C»H«NO«Na, occurring in oxgall; used as a cholagogue. s. guaiacolcarbonatc. Used like s. salicylate, a. hydrate. See soda (1st def.). 8. hydrobromate. See s. bromid. s. hydrocarbonatc. See s. bicarbonate, s. hydrochloratc. See s. chlorid. B. hydroxid. The soda of the U. S. Ph., 1890. s. hypochlorite. A compound, NaOCl, of s. and hypochlorous acid. It has not been isolated, but occurs in combination with s. chlorid in liquor sodae chloratae. s. hypophosphlte. A substance, NaH2POi+HaO, occurring as colorless tabular crystals or as an amorphous or crystalline powder of no odor and a sweetish saline [U. S. Ph.] taste, soluble in water or dilute alcohol. The salt of the Br. Ph. is nearly anhydrous. s. ichthyolsulphonate. See ichthyol. s. iodate. A salt of s. and iodic acid. 8. iodld. A compound of s. and iodin, Nal; used like potassium iodid [U. S. Ph., Br. Ph.]. s. lygosinate. (NasCuH^Os-f7H2O). Sternutatory; said to be an active germicide. Useful in uterine gonorrhea, s. nitrate. A salt, NaNOs, of a salty bitterish taste; used in angina pectoris, epilepsy, and spasmodic asthma [U. S. Ph.], s. nitrite. This salt is used as a vasodilator. It undergoes oxidation readily, being converted into s. nitrate [U. S. Ph., Br. Ph.]. 8. oxynaphthol.iic. CioH.(OH).COONa; antipyretic and antiseptic. s. panic resolute. Cs. carbolate. s. phcnolsulphonatc. See s. sulplwcarbolale. sodii phosphas. Ordinary phosphate of s.; disodic orthophosphate. See s. phospltate [U. S. Ph., Br. Ph.]. sodii phosphas elTerTesccns. A granular salt contain
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cresylate (kres'il-at). A cresol compound in which the hydrogen of the hydroxyl is replaced by a base.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cresylate (kres'I-lat). A salt of cresylic acid, or cresol.
  152. cribrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cribrum (krib'rum) [L. a sieve. ] Lamina cribrosa [UNA], c. benedic'tum, area cribrosa [SNA].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cribrum (kri'brum) [L. a "sieve"]. The lamina cribrosa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cribrum (krib'rum) [L. a sieve. ] Lamina cribrosa [UNA], c. benedic'tum, area cribrosa [SNA].
  153. cross-fire - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cross-fire (craws'fir). Therapeutic radiation applied by frequent change of position of the applicator or by means of two or more applicators at different points.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cross-fire (kros'flr). Application of radiationtreatment from different points on the exterior, but with the rays directed toward the same internal point, so that the rays cross one another.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cross-fire (craws'fir). Therapeutic radiation applied by frequent change of position of the applicator or by means of two or more applicators at different points.
  154. crotalin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      crotalin (kro'-tal-in) [xpAraXov, a rattle]. An albuminous body contained in the poison of the cobra. It is not coagulable by heat at 212° C.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cro'talin [Croialus, a genus of rattlesnakes.] i. A protein in rattlesnake venom. 2. Trade name of a preparation made from rattlesnake-virus, which has been recommended in the treatment of epilepsy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      crotalin (kro'tal-in). A protein found in the venom of rattlesnakes and certain other serpents. It has been used hypodermically in the treatment of epilepsy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cro'talin [Croialus, a genus of rattlesnakes.] i. A protein in rattlesnake venom. 2. Trade name of a preparation made from rattlesnake-virus, which has been recommended in the treatment of epilepsy.
  155. crotalus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cro'talus. A homeopathic preparation of the venom of the rattlesnake, Crotalus horridvs, triturated with milk-sugar; employed in ecchymoses, oozing of blood, hemorrhagic measles, etc., in doses of the 6th to 3Oth potency.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cro'talus. A homeopathic preparation of the venom of the rattlesnake, Crotalus horridvs, triturated with milk-sugar; employed in ecchymoses, oozing of blood, hemorrhagic measles, etc., in doses of the 6th to 3Oth potency.
  156. crotonism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      crotonism (kro'-lon-iim). Poisoning by rroton oil; a condition marked by hemorrhagic gastroenteritis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      crotonism (kro'ton-izm). Poisoning by croton oil.
  157. cryalgesia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cryalgesia (kri-al-je'-te-tth) [uplnt, cold; lAyvra, pain]. Pain from the application of cold.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cryalgesia (kri-al-je'zl-ah) [G. kryos, cold, + olgos, pain.] Pain caused by cold.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cryalgesia (kri-al-je'zl-ah) [G. kryos, cold, + olgos, pain.] Pain caused by cold.
  158. crymotherapy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      crymotherapy (kri-mo-ther'-ap-t) |. ,„,/..«. icy cold; fi/mnla, therapy). Ribard's term for the therapeutic use of great cold applied locally. A bag filled with carbonic snow at a temperature of —176" F. is applied daily for half an hour to the pit of the stomach. It is previously surrounded by cotton to prevent injury to the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      crymother'apy [G. krymos, cold, + tkerapeia, treatment ] The employment of cold in the treatment of disease.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      crymotherapy (kri"mo-ther'ap-e). The therapeutical use of intense cold. [Gr., krymos, icy cold, -4- therapeia, therapeutics.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      crymother'apy [G. krymos, cold, + tkerapeia, treatment ] The employment of cold in the treatment of disease.
  159. cryptozygous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cryptozygous (krip-tos'-ig-us) [crypto-; firyAr, yoke). Having the dental arches or zygomata concealed from view when the skull is viewed from above.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cryptoz'ygous [G. kryptos, hidden, + tygon, yoke.] Having a narrow face as compared with the width of the cranium, so that, when the skull is viewed from above, the zygomatic arches are not visible.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cryptoz'ygous [G. kryptos, hidden, + tygon, yoke.] Having a narrow face as compared with the width of the cranium, so that, when the skull is viewed from above, the zygomatic arches are not visible.
  160. crystallophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      crystallophobia (kris"tal-o-fo'be-ah) [crystal + Gr fear]. Insane dread of glass objects.
  161. culicicide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicicide (ku-lis'is-Id). Same as culicide.
  162. culicide - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cu'licide. An agent which destroys mosquitos.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicide (ku'lis-Id) [L. ni'lex gnat + cafdcrt to kill]. An agent destructive to gnats and Seas.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cu'licide. An agent which destroys mosquitos.
  163. culicifuge - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      culicifuge (ku-lis'-if-uf) [culex; fugare, to drive away]. An agent to drive away .nosquitoes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      culicifuge (ku-list-fuj) [L. culcx(culic-), mosquito, + fugare, to drive away.] i. Driving away gnats and mosquitos. a. An agent which keeps mosquitos from biting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      culicifuge (ku-lis'if-Oj) [L. cuflex gnat -f- /u'fo banishment]. A preparation intended to prevent the attacks of gnats and mosquitos.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      culicifuge (ku-list-fuj) [L. culcx(culic-), mosquito, + fugare, to drive away.] i. Driving away gnats and mosquitos. a. An agent which keeps mosquitos from biting.
  164. cuprammonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cuprammonia (ku-pra-mo'nl-ah). A mixture of a solution of copper hydroxide and aqua ammoniac.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cuprammonia (ku-pra-mo'nl-ah). A mixture of a solution of copper hydroxide and aqua ammoniac.
  165. cupreine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cupreine (ku'-pre-in), CiiHnNiOi. An alkaloid derived from cuprea bark.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cupreine (ku'pre-en). An alkaloid, CuHjjNjOj + aHsO, from cuprea-bark, occurring in the form of colorless crystals.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cupreine (ku'pre-en). An alkaloid, CuHjjNjOj + aHsO, from cuprea-bark, occurring in the form of colorless crystals.
  166. curet - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      curet (ku-ref) [Fr.]. A kind of scraper or spoon for removing growths or other matter from the walls of cavities. Hartmann's c., a curet for removing adenoids.
  167. curettement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      curettement (ku-ret'-ment) [Fr.t curettement]. The removal of vegetations, retained placenta, etc., by means of a curet. Syn., curetagt; cureting; curettate; curettement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Curettage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Same as curettage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      curettement (ku-ret'ment). Curettage.
  168. cusso - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cusso (koos'o) [an Abyssinian word.] (Br.) Kousso, brayera (N.P.); the dried female inflorescence of Hagenia abyssinica (Brayera anthetmintica), a tree of the elevated regions of Abyssinia; employed as a teniacide, in doses of S i (15.0) of the fluidextract, or SJ-i (15.0-30.0) of the infusion.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cus'so. See kusso.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cusso (koos'o) [an Abyssinian word.] (Br.) Kousso, brayera (N.P.); the dried female inflorescence of Hagenia abyssinica (Brayera anthetmintica), a tree of the elevated regions of Abyssinia; employed as a teniacide, in doses of S i (15.0) of the fluidextract, or SJ-i (15.0-30.0) of the infusion.
  169. cuticularization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cuticularization Iku-tiJt-u-lar-it-a'-shun) [culicula, dim. of culis, the skin]. The formation of a cuticula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutic"ulariza'tion. Healing of an abrasion of the skin or ulcer by the spread of epidermis over the surface.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutic"ulariza'tion. Healing of an abrasion of the skin or ulcer by the spread of epidermis over the surface.
  170. cutisector - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cutisector (ku-le-sek'-lor) [cults; sector, a cutter]. An instrument for taking small sections of akin from the living subject.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutisector (ku"H-seVtor) [L. cutis, skin, + sector, a cutter.] i. An instrument for cutting bits of epidermis for grafting. 3. An instrument for removing a section or cylinder of skin for microscopical examination.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutisector (ku"H-seVtor) [L. cutis, skin, + sector, a cutter.] i. An instrument for cutting bits of epidermis for grafting. 3. An instrument for removing a section or cylinder of skin for microscopical examination.
  171. cutitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cutitis (ka-tr-lis). Same as dermatitis, a. r.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutitis (ku-ti'(te')tis). Dermatitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutitis (ku-ti'(te')tis). Dermatitis.
  172. cutization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cutiza'tion. The transition from mucous membrane to skin at the mucocutaneous margins.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cutiza'tion. The transition from mucous membrane to skin at the mucocutaneous margins.
  173. cyanurin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyanurin (si-an-t'-rin) [riom, blue; olpov, urine]. Uroglaucin or urine-indigo; indigo found in the urine in cystitis and in chrorrc kidney-diseases; it is also occasionally found in apparent health. ,
  174. cyclarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyclarthrosis (sik-lar-lhro'-sis) [«<*Xoi, a circle; &p6pbxrtf, a joint]. A circular or rotatory articulation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyclarthro'sis [G. kyklos, circle, + arthrosis, articulation.] A rotary, or lateral ginglymus, joint.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyclarthro'sis [G. kyklos, circle, + arthrosis, articulation.] A rotary, or lateral ginglymus, joint.
  175. cyclitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyclitis (si-kli'(kle')tis) [G. kyklos, circle (ciliary body), + -ttis.] Inflammation of the ciliary body, plas'tic c., inflammation of the ciliary body, and usually of the entire uvcal tract, with a fibrinous exudation into the anterior chamber and vitreous, pure c., uncomplicated c., the iris not being involved in the inflammatory process, pu'rulent c., suppurative inflammation of the ciliary body, including usually the iris. se'rous c., simple c., serous iritis, punctate keratitis, descemetitis; simple inflammation of the ciliary body without suppuration or plastic exudate. cyclocepha'lia, cycloceph'aly [G. kyklos, round, +
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyclitis (si-kli'(kle')tis) [G. kyklos, circle (ciliary body), + -ttis.] Inflammation of the ciliary body, plas'tic c., inflammation of the ciliary body, and usually of the entire uvcal tract, with a fibrinous exudation into the anterior chamber and vitreous, pure c., uncomplicated c., the iris not being involved in the inflammatory process, pu'rulent c., suppurative inflammation of the ciliary body, including usually the iris. se'rous c., simple c., serous iritis, punctate keratitis, descemetitis; simple inflammation of the ciliary body without suppuration or plastic exudate. cyclocepha'lia, cycloceph'aly [G. kyklos, round, +
  176. cyclotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyclotome (siP-lo-tom) [.i'.v.t, circle: rout*.
  177. cyesiology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyesiology (si-t-se-ol'-o-jl) [«i^(rii. pregnancy; XAr°«. treatise]. The science of gestation in its medical aspects.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyesiology (si-e-sl-ol'o-jt) [G. kiisis, pregnancy, + -logia.] Obstetrics, the branch of medical science which has to do with pregnancy and parturition
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyesiology (si-e-sl-ol'o-jt) [G. kiisis, pregnancy, + -logia.] Obstetrics, the branch of medical science which has to do with pregnancy and parturition
  178. cylindrocellular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cylin"drocell'ular. Relating to cylindrical cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cylin"drocell'ular. Relating to cylindrical cells.
  179. cyphosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cyphosis (si-fo'-sis). Sec hypnosis.
  180. cypridophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cypridophobia (si-prl-do-fo'bl-ah) [G. K1 pris, Venus, + phobos, fear.] i. A morbid dread of contracting venereal disease. 2. An erroneous belief that one is suffering from venereal disease. 3. Amorbid fear of the sexual act.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cypridophobia (si-prl-do-fo'bl-ah) [G. K1 pris, Venus, + phobos, fear.] i. A morbid dread of contracting venereal disease. 2. An erroneous belief that one is suffering from venereal disease. 3. Amorbid fear of the sexual act.
  181. cypripedin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cypripedin (sii>-rip-c.'-[Kivpts, Venus; »66ioc. a slipper]. A precipitate from the tincture of Cypripedium Pubescens; antispasmodic, nervine, narcotic. Dose i to 3 grains.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cyprip'edin. An eclectic concentration pr. duct from a tincture of the root of cypripedium; employed in neuralgia and hysteria in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      cypripedin (sip-ri-peMin). Of the eclectics, a resinoid obtained from Cypripcdium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cyprip'edin. An eclectic concentration pr. duct from a tincture of the root of cypripedium; employed in neuralgia and hysteria in doses of gr. $-2 (0.03-0.13).
  182. cypriphobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cypriphobia (sip-rif-o'-be-aM) [Kfarpu. Venus, 2. Fear of contracting venereal disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cypripho'bia. Cypridophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cypripho'bia. Cypridophobia.
  183. cystalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cystalgia (sist-al'-je-ak) [cyst; l&yoi, pain]. Pain in the bladder.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cystalgia (sis-tal'je-ah) [Gr. xfemi bladder + fiX-yot pain]. Pain in the bladder.
  184. cytheromania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytheromania (silh-ur-o-ma'-ne-ah). See nymphomania.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytheromania (sith'er-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. Cythera, one of the names of Aphrodite or Venus, + mania, frenzy.] Nymphomania. cyt'Uine. An alkaloid, CnHuNsO, from the seeds
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytheromania (sith"er-o-ma'ne-ah) [Gr. nvtttpa. Venus + nai'ia madness]. Nymphomania.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytheromania (sith'er-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. Cythera, one of the names of Aphrodite or Venus, + mania, frenzy.] Nymphomania. cyt'Uine. An alkaloid, CnHuNsO, from the seeds
  185. cytotaxis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      cytotaxis (si-to-taks'-is) (cyto-; rdf«, order]. The directive influence which determines the arrangement of cells. The selective, ordering, and arranging function of a living cell.
  186. cytotropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [G. kytos, cell, + tropi, a. turning.] Having an affinity for cells.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [Gr. ultra* cell + rpoirii a turn). Attracting cells; having affinity for cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      cytotropic (si-to-trop'ik) [G. kytos, cell, + tropi, a. turning.] Having an affinity for cells.