User:Visviva/Medical/By links/Caps

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Caps - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - Z

  1. -iasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      -iasis. A termination denoting a process or its result (as lithiasis from Xftfot a stone). And see -osis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      -iasis [G.] A termination noting a condition or state expressed by a verb terminating in -a8 or -ia6, as psoriasis from fsoriao I have the itch or mange. In medical neologisms it has the same value as, and is sometimes interchangeable with, -osis,* as trickiniasis or trichinosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      -iasis [G.] A termination noting a condition or state expressed by a verb terminating in -a8 or -ia6, as psoriasis from fsoriao I have the itch or mange. In medical neologisms it has the same value as, and is sometimes interchangeable with, -osis,* as trickiniasis or trichinosis.
  2. -tome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      -tome [G. tomos, cutting.] A termination denoting a cutting instrument, the first element in the compound usually indicating the part which the instrument is designed to cut.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      -tome [Gr. tiiir'ur to cut]. A suffix signifying (a) an instrument for cutting or (6) a segment.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      -tome [G. tomos, cutting.] A termination denoting a cutting instrument, the first element in the compound usually indicating the part which the instrument is designed to cut.
  3. AOO - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      AOO. Abbreviation for anodal opening odor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      AOO. Abbreviation for anodal opening odor. AOP. Abbreviation for anodal opening picture. aorta (a-or'tah) [L.; Gr. «,,;.rij|. The great artery that springs from the left ventricle and gives rise to all the arteries of the systemic circulation. The aorta divides opposite the fourth lumbar vertebra into the two common iliacs. See arteries, table of. abdominal a., the part of the aorta below the diaphragm, a. angus'ta, narrowness of the aorta, arch of the a., the proximal portion of the aorta, consisting of an ascending, a transverse, and a descending part. a. chlorot'ica, a small aorta sometimes seen in one affected with chlorosis, dynamic a., a neurotic condition
  4. Abrus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Abrus (a'-brus) [A0p4t, pretty]. Jequirity; Indian licorice. The seeds of A. precatorius, or wild licorice. Its properties are thought to be due to the presence of certain ferments. See abrin. Infusions applied to the conjunctiva or to any mucous surface induce violent purulent inflammation with growth of false membrane. It is used in producing artificial conjunctivitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Abrus (a'brus) [L.; Gr. Aßp&t delicate]. A genus of leguminous plants. A. precato'rius, or jequirity, has poisonous seeds: the infusion is strongly irritant to the eyes, and is used in granular ophthalmia. See jequirity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      A'brus [more correctly Habrus, from G. habros, graceful.] A genus of leguminous plants. A. precata'rius, Ind ian liquorice, the root being sometimes used as a substitute for liquorice; the seeds have been employed in ophthalmic practice, see iequirity.
  5. Adansonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Adansonia (ad-an-so'ne-ah) [after Michel Adanson, 1727-1806, French naturalist]. A genus of sterculiaceous trees. A. digita'la is the baobab, a huge tree of Africa; found also in India; the leaves are febrifugal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Adansonia (ad-an-so'ne-ah) (after Michel Adamon, 1727-1806, French naturalist]. A genus of sterculiaceous trees. A. difila'la is the baobab, a huge tree of Africa; found also in India; the leaves arc febrifugal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Adanso'nia [Michel Adanson, French naturalist, 1727-1806.] A genus of trees of the natural order Malvacea. A. digita'ta, calabash-tree, baobab, a tree of Senegal the leaves of which have been used as a febrifuge.
  6. Adv - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Adv. Abbreviation for L. adver'sum, against.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Adv. Abbreviation for L. advcr'sum, against.
  7. Aetius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Aetius (a-e'she-us). A Greek medical writer who flourished about 500 A. D., the author of a medical work in sixteen books, the Tetrabiblon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ae'tius (a-e'she-us). A Greek medical writer who flourished about 500 A. i • , the author of a medical work in sixteen books, the Tetrabiblon.
  8. Agaricus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Agaricus (ag-ar'ik-us). A genus of mushrooms. See agaric.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Agaricus (ag-ar'ik-us). A genus of mushrooms. See agaric.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Agar'icus [see agaric.] A genus of mushrooms, many of which are edible. A. campus tris, the common edible field mushroom. A. musca'rius, fly agaric, poison mushroom; a tincture from the fresh fungus is employed in homeopathy in the irregular heart action of coffee- and tea-drinkers and tobacco-smokers, in doses of the third to the thirtieth decimal potency.
  9. Alpinia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Alpinia (al-fin'-e-nh) [Prosper Alpinus. Italian botanist. 1553-1617]. A genus of zingiberaccous tropical plants. 'A. chinensis, A. officinarum, and other species furnish galangal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Alpinia (al-pin'e-ah) [after Prospero Alpini, 15531617]. A genus of zingiberaceous plants. See ealangal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Alpinia (al-pin'e-ah) [after Prospero Afpini. 15531617). A genus of zingiberaceous plants. See galangal.
  10. Alstonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Alstonia (al-sto'ne-ah) [after C. Alston, 16831700]- A genus of apocynaccous trees. A.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Alstonia (al-sto'ne-ah) [after C. Alston, 16831760]. A genus of apocynaceous trees. A. srliula'rix, a tree of tropical Asia, affords dita bark.
  11. Alternaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Alternaria (al-ter-na're-ah). A genus of hyphomycetous fungi with dark-colored conidia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Alternaria (al-ter-na're-ah). A genus of byphomycetous fungi with dark-colored conidia.
  12. Amomum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Amomum (am-o'-mum) [lituitm. an Eastern spice plant). A genus of scitaminaceous plants to which the cardamom (A. cardamomum) and "grains of paradise" (A. granum parodist) belong.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Amomum (ah-mo'mum) [L.; Gr. Shjuuov]. A genus
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Amo'mum [G. amomon, an Indian spice plant.] A genus of herbaceous plants of the natural order Scitaminetp; cardamom and grains of paradise are obtained from species of Amotnum.
  13. Anchusa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Anchusa (an-ku'zah) [L.; Gr. ay\ovaa alkanet]. The genus of plants to which alkanet (q. v.) belongs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Anchusa (an-ku'zah) [L.; Gr. i-yxoura alkanet]. The genus of plants to which alkanet (q. v.) belongs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Anchusa (an-ku'sah) [G. anchousa, alkanet.] A genus of plants of the natural order Boraginacetx. A. tincto'ria, Alkanna tinctoria, the source of alkanet, a red dye.
  14. Anethum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Anethum (an-e'thum) 11,.: Gr. itnfiov}. A genus of plants, including fennel and dill. The fruit of A. or Peuccd'anum grave'olens, or dill, is carminative and stimulant. See dill and jcnnel.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ane'thum [G. anethon, dill.] A genus of plants of the natural order Umbellifera; two species, A. fcenic'ulum, fennel, and A. grave'olens, are employed in medicine; see anethi fructus and fceniculum.
  15. Anopheles - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Anopheles (an-of-el-St) [dru^X^t, harmful]. A genus of dipterous insects (mosquitoes^, belonging to the family Ctdiddte. A. christopherse, of India, harbors sporozoits, and in districts wher^ present the endemic index of malaria varies from 40 to 72 %. A. maculipennis, is the common form of northern and central Europe and America, and the common agent in the transmission of the malaria parasite. Syn.. Anopheles quadrimaculatus. A. rossii, the most widely distributed species in India, breeding in foul water; does not carry the parasite of benign nor of malignant tertian fever, and in Calcutta, where this is the prevalent species, the endemic index of malaria is zero.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Anopheles (an-of'el-ees). A genus of
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Anopheles (an-of'g-l6z) [G. anopheles, useless, harmful.] A genus of mosquitos of the family Culicida, subfamily Anophelina. The sporogenous cycle of the malarial parasite is passed in the body cavity of a female mosquito of certain species of this genus. A. albima'nus [L. albus, white, + man us. hand], a species having white hind feet. a common carrier of the malarial parasite. A. maculipen'nis, the type species of this genus; the wings are marked by spots formed of collections of scales; one of the most widely spread species and active in the dissemination of the malarial germ. A. punctipen'nis, a species which apparently does not transmit the malaria germ.
  16. Antiaris - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Antiaris (an-te-a'ris) [Javanese antiar]. A genus of artocarpous trees. A. toxica'ria is the upas-tree of Java: exceedingly poisonous.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Antiaris (an-te'ar-is). A genus of the Artocarpaccae. A. toxicaria. The upas tree; a Java species containing an acriipo or upas
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Antiaris (an-te-a'ris) [Javanese anliar]. A genus of artocarpous trees. A. loxua'ria is the upas-tree of Java: exceedingly poisonous.
  17. Apis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Apis (a'-pis) [L.. a bee|. A genus of hymenopterous insects. A. roellifka. the honey-bee; in homeopathy the poison of the honey-bee's sting, or a preparation thereof.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      A'pis [L. bee.] A genus of hymenopterous insects, the bees. A. melhfV-n [L. mel, honey, + facere, to make.] (i) the honey-bee, hive-bee, the source of honey; (2) a homeopathic remedy, apis mellifica, made by shaking a number of bees together in a bottle to make them angry, and then pouring alcohol over them; employed in nephritis complicating scarlet fever, in erysipelas, conjunctivitis with smarting of the eyes, and to control night screaming of children; dose, 3rd to 3Oth potency.
  18. Arachis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Arachis (ar'-ak-isj (ipaxoj, a leguminous plant]. A genus of leguminous plants. A. hypogsea, see ground nut. a. oil, peanut oil.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Arachis (ar'ak-is). See peanut.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Arachis (ar'S-kis). A genus of leguminous plants, the best known species of which is A. hypogaea, the peanut, ft. oil, peanut oil.
  19. Areca - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Areca (ar-e'-kah). A genus of East Indian palms. A. catechu Is extensively distributed throughout the tropics of Asia, where it has been cultivated from the earliest times. It furnishes the betel-nut (q. t>.); the powdered nut is used as a vermifuge.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Are'ca (ar-e'kah). A genus of lofty palmaceous trees, a.-iiut. Lat., areca [Br. Ph., 1867], semen arccae. Syn.: betelnut, because chewed with the leaf of the betel pepper. Employed mainly in veterinary practice.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Areca (ar'e-kah) [L.; East Indian], i. A genus of palm trees, chiefly Asiatic. A. cat'eeJut affords betel-nut and an inferior catechu. The fruit is tonic, astringent, and anthelmintic. Dose of fluidextract, 00-180 min. (3.75-11.25 ex.).
  20. Aristolochia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Aristolochia (ar-is-to-lo'-kf-ah) [Apurroc, best; the lochiaj. A genus of exogenous herbs.<span class=
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Aristolochia (ar"is-to-lo'ke-ah) [L.; Gr. &purrot best + Xdxm lochia). A genus of shrubs and herbs of many species: often actively medicinal. See serpentaria and guaco.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Aristolochia (ar"is-to-lo'ke-ah) [L.; Gr. tpiyrm best + Xoxta lochia]. A genus of shrubs and herbs of many species: often actively medicinal. See serpenlaria and guaco.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Aristolochia (ar-is-to-lo'ki-ah) [G. aristos, best, + locheia childbirth, some species having oxytocic powers.) A genus of plants, mostly climbers, some of which furnish drugs which have been used more or less in medicine. A. antihyster'ica, the root possesses emetic and diaphoretic properties. A. clemati'tis, has been used as an emmenagogue and oxytocic. A. in'dica, furnishes the drug aristolochia.* A. serpenta'ria furnishes the drug serpentaria.'
  21. Asarum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Asarum (as'ar-um) [L ; Gr. dcrapw]. 1. A gem of aristolochiaceous plants. 2. The root of j canaden'se, wild ginger or Canada snakeroot. is fragrant and aromatic stimulant. Dose of Sua extract, 15-60 min. (1-4 c.c). A. europa'um. asarabacca, is diuretic, diaphoretic, purgativ and emetic. Dose of the leaves (as'ari jo'li as an errhine. 1-2 gr. (0.066-0.133 gm.); as I emetic, 30-120 gr. (1.95-7.8 gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Asarum (as'ar-um) [I, . Or. aoapor]. i. A genus of aristolochiaceous plants. 2. The root of A. canodrn' wild ginger or Canada snakcroot, is a fragrant and aromatic stimulant. Dose of fluidextract, 15-60 min. (1-4 c.c.). A. europium, or asarabacca, is diuretic, diaphoretic, purgative, and emetic. Dose of the leaves (as'ari fo'lia) as an errhine, 1-2 gr. (0.066-0.133 gm.); as an emetic, 30-120 gr. (1.95-7.8 gm.). asbestos (as-bes'tos) [Gr. Haftarrm quicklime]. A fibrous magnesian and calcic silicate, haying a limited use in dentistry and surgery. It is incombustible.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      As'arum. A genus of plants of the natural order Aristolochiacea. A. canaden'se, wild ginger, Indian ginger, Canada snakeroot; the rhizome and rootlets are official in the N.F. as asarum; employed as an aromatic stimulant 'and diaphoretic, in doses of gr. 15-30 (1.0-2.0). and also in the compound syrup in dose of 5i <4-o). A. europte'um, hazelwort, European snakeroot; the root is used as an emetic and cathartic in doses of 31—1 (2 •0-4. o), and as an errhine in doses of gr. r-2 (0.06-0.13).
  22. Ascaris - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ascaris (as'kar-is), pi. asca/ides (as-kar'id■[L.; Gr. aonapls]. A genus of intestinal lumbrict parasites. A. ala'ta and A. mys tax occ occasionally in the human intestine. A. lumbi coi'des, a common worm resembling the earl worm; it is found in the small intestine, causi: colicky pains and diarrhea. A. texa'na, a spec recently found in Texas. A. vermicula ris. S Oxyuris.
  23. Asclepias - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Asclepias (as-kle'-pe-as) [AcxXijTiAi]. j. Pleurisyroot. The root of Asclepias tuberose, A popular remedy in the Southern States for pleurisy. It is diaphoretic, emetic, and cathartic. The infusion recommended has a strength of i oz. of the powdered root to 32 oz. of water. Dose a teacupful every 3 or 4 hours. 2. A genus of plants of the order Asclepiadacta. A. blood-flower. Is an herb common to tropical America; astringent, styptic, and anthelmintic against the tape-worm. Dose of fluidextract 20 min.-i dr. (1.3-4.0 Cc.). A. longifolia, of the western United States, is diaphoretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Asclepias (as-kle'pe-as) [L.]. A genus of asclepiadaceous plants. The root of A. tubero'sa, or pleurisy-root, is expectorant, diaphoretic, and tonic, and is used in the fevers of rheumatism, pleurisy, and bronchitis. Dose in powder, 20-60 gr. (1.333-4 gm.). A. curassa'rica is an herb of tropical America: astringent, styptic, and, anthelmintic. Dose of fluidextract, 20-60 min. (1.25-4 c.c.).
  24. Asimina - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Asimina (ah-sim'in-ah) [L., from its Algonkin name]. A genus of North American trees and shrubs. A. tril'oba, the papaw or pawpaw, has an edible fruit and medicinal properties.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Asimina (ah-sim'in-ah) [L., from its Algonkin name]. A genus of North American trees and shrubs. A. tril'oba, the papaw or pawpaw, has an edible fruit and medicinal properties.
  25. Aspidosperma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Aspidosperma (as"pid-o-sper'mah) [Gr. iat shield + o-ripna. seed]. 1. A genus of apocyn ceous trees. 2. Quebracho bark: the bark A. qucbra'cho,- a South American tree. It antiperiodic and is useful in asthmatic and a diac dyspnea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Aspidosper'ma [G. aspis(aspij-), a shield, + sperma, seed.] A genus of trees of the family Apocynacete, the dried bark of a species of which, A. quebrachobianco, is the drug quebracho, official in the U.S. P. as aspidosperma; it has been employed in dyspnea in doses of 1115—60 (1.0-4.0) of the powder, or 1560 (4.0) of the official fluidextract.
  26. Atherosperma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Atherosperma (ath"e-ro-sper'mah) [Gr. iBfip spike + oirippa seed]. A genus of monimiaceous trees: the bark of A. moscha'tum. sassafras tree of Australasia, is diaphoretic, diuretic, and sedative. Dose of the tincture, 30-60 min. (2-4 c.c); of the volatile oil, 1-3 min. (0.06-0.2 c.c).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Atherosper'ma. A genus of trees. A. moschatum. The Tasmanian or Australian sassafras; a large tree growing in New Holland. The bark (sassafras bark) yields a volatile oil which is said to act as a diuretic; it also contains an alkaloid called atherospermin. [Gr., ather, a beard, + spcrma, a seed.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Atherosperma(ath"e-ro-sper'mah) [Gr. i>,,. spike + oirkpua seed). A genus of monimiaceous trees: the bark of A. tnoscha'tum, sassafras tree of Australasia, is diaphoretic, diuretic, and sedative. Dose of the tincture, 30-60 min. (2-4 •:.<•.); of the volatile oil, 1-3 min. (0.06-0.2 c.c.).
  27. Avenzoar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Avenzoar (av-cn-zo'ar). A renowned Arabic physician, born in Seville, Spain, about the beginning of the twelfth century, his full name being Abu Mcnvan Ibn Zohr. His principal writing was a compendium of practice, al-Teisir, which is replete with interesting clinical reports. He died in 1162.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Avenzoar (av-en-zo'ar). A renowned Arabic physician, born in Seville, Spain, about the beginning of the twelfth century, his full name being Abu Merwan Ibn Zohr. His principal writing was a compendium of practice, al-Telsir, which is replete with interesting clinical reports. He died in 1162.
  28. Baptisia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Baptisia (bap-tiz'e-ah) (L.; Gr. jgaartfsw to dye]. A genus of leguminous plants. B. tincto'ria, an herb of North America, is cathartic, emetic, antiseptic, etc. It is used it typhoid and typhus fevers, in amenorrhea, and is applied locally to gangrenous sores and ulcers. Dose of extract, 1-10 gr. (0.066-0.666 gm.); of fluidextract, 2-20 min. (0.12-1.25 c.c); of tincture. 10-30 min. (0.652 c.c); of resin, 1-5 gr. (0.066-0.333 gm).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Baptisia (bap-tiz'e-ah) |L.; Gr. 0avrffui< to dye]. A genus of leguminous plants. B. tincto'ria, an herb of North America, is cathartic, emetic, antiseptic, etc. It is used it typhoid and typhus fevers, in amcnorrhea, and is applied locally to gangrenous sores and ulcers. Dose of extract, i-io gr. (0.066-0.666 gm.); of fluidextract, 2-20 min. (0.12-1.25 c.c.); of tincture, 10-30 min. (0.652 c.c.l; of resin, 1-5 gr. (0.066-0.333 gm.).
  29. Beggiatoa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Beggiato'a [J. Beggiato, Italian botanist.] A genus of bacteria which, like Thiothrix, contains sulphur.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Beggiatoa (bej"e-ah-to'ah) [named for F. S. Beggialo]. A genus of Schizoraycetes growing in water, especially stagnant or contaminated water. They are seen in the form of gliding threads of gray or violet color. B. al'ba form baregin; B. roseopersici'na produces bacteriopurpurin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Beggiato'a [J. Beggiato, Italian botanist.] A genus of bacteria which, like Thiothrix, contains sulphur.
  30. Betonica - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Betonica (bc-ton'ik-ah) [L.]. A genus of labiate plants. B. officinalis, wood betony, was formerly used in medicine: the tops are astringent and aromatic; the root, emetic and cathartic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Betonica (be-ton'ik-ah) [L.]. A genus of labiate plants. B. officina'lis, wood betony, was formerly used in medicine: the tops are astringent and aromatic; the root, emetic and cathartic.
  31. Bilharzia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Bilharzia (bil-har'ze-ah) {for T. BUHarz]. A genus of flukes or trcmatodes. SeeSckistosomahamolobium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Bilhar'zia [Theodor Bilharz, German helminthologist, 1825-1862.] A genus of trematode worms, now called Schistosomum.
  32. Blatta - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Blatta (blat'-ah) [L.. "blood-colored"], i. A genus of Blatlidx. 2. A clot of blood. B. (Periplaneta) orienta is, the cockroach ; the powdered body is a popular remedy for dropsy among the Russian peasants. Tinctwa blattarum orientalium is used in whooping-cough. Dose, I or 2 drops in water at intervals of 2 hours
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Blatta (blat'ah) [LJ. A genus of insects—the coc roaches. They are diuretic, and afford an hydropin. taracannin. and blattic acid. Dose Blatta orienla'lis, in powder, 2-8 gr. (0.133-0.3 gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Blatta (blat'ah) [L.]. A genus of insects—the cockroaches. They are diuretic, and afford antihydropin, taracannin, and blattic acid. Dose of Blat'la orienta'lis, in powder, 2-8 gr. (0.133-0.528 gm.).
  33. Bodo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Bodo (bo'-do) [L.]. A genus of flagellate protozoa. B. saltans has been reported as living in great numbers in unhealthy ulcerations. B. urmariui has been found in the urine of cholera-patients.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Bodo (bo'do). A genus of endoparasitic protozoa, which are probably pathogenic. B. sal'tans has been found in ulcers, and B. urina'rius, in the urine of cholera.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Bo'do. A genus of protozoan organisms some of which are parasitic in the intestine of man and other mammalians; it is wedge-shaped, the narrow part being twisted in itself, and is provided with two nagella. B. urina'rius, a species found occasionally in the urine, but probably not pathogenic.
  34. Braidism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Braid'ism [James Braid, English physician, 17951860.] Hypnotism.
  35. Bryonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Bryonia (bri-o'ne-ah) [I..; Gr. Bpwvla]. 1. A genus of cucurbitaceous plants called bryony. 2. The root of B. al'ba and B. dioi'ca. It is an active and acrid hydragogue cathartic, and is given in pneumonia, pleurisy, rheumatic fever, and colds. Its use is largely homeopathic. Dose of the powdered root, 20-60 gr. (1.3-3.7 gm.); of the tincture, 5-30 min. (0.333-2 c.c); of the fluidextract, 10-60 min. (0.6-4 c.c).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Bryonia (bri-o'ne-an) jl... Gr. Bpvavla\. I. A genus of cucurbitaceous plants called bryony. 3. The root of B. al'ba and B. dioi'ca. It is an active and acrid hydragogue cathartic, and is given in pneumonia, pleurisy, rheumatic fever, and colds. Its use is largely homeopathic. Dose of the powdered root, 20-60 gr. (1.3-3.7 gm.); of the tincture, 5-30 min. (0.333-2 ex.); of the fluidextract, 10-60 min. (0.6-4 c.c.).
  36. But - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      But. Abbreviation for L. buty'rum. butter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      But. Abbreviation for L. buty'rum, butter.
  37. Butea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Butea (bu'te-ah) (for John Stuart. Earl of Bute. ir¡ > 17Q2]. A genus of tropical leguminous trees. J ¡rondo sa. a tree of South Asia, is one of the s;< cies that afford kino.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Butea (bu'te-ah) [for John Stuart, Earl of Bute, 17131702], A genus of tropical leguminous trees. /'. frondo'sa, a tree of South Asia, is one of the species that afford kino.
  38. COC - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      COC. Abbreviation for cathodal opening contraction.
  39. Calotropis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Calotropis (kal-ot'ro-pis). See mudar.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Calotropis (kal-ot'ro-pis). See mudar.
  40. Cantharis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cantharis (kan'thar-is), pi. canthar'ides [L.; Gr. K&rdapos beetle]. 1. A genus of beetles. 2. The blistering or Spanish fly, Can'lharis vesicato'ria. Cantharides are applied externally as powerful rubefacient and blistering agents; in moderate internal doses they are diuretic and stimulant to the urinary and reproductive organs: they are highly poisonous in large doses. Dose of the tincture, 1-20 min. (0.066-1.333 c.c).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cantharis (kan'thar-is), pi. cantkar'ides [L.; Gr. xavOapm beetle], i. A genus of beetles. 2. The blistering or Spanish fly, Can'tharis vesicata'ria. Cantharides are applied externally as powerful rubefacient and blistering agents; in moderate internal doses they are diuretic and stimulant to the urinary and reproductive organs: they are highly poisonous in large doses. Dose of the tincture, 1-20 min. (0.066-1.333 c.c.).
  41. Cap - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cap. Abbreviation for L. ca'piat, let him take.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cap. Abbreviation for L. ca'piat, let him take.
  42. Catalpa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Catalpa (kat-al'-pahl [native Am. Indian]. A genus of American and Asiatic bignoniaceous trees. A. bignoniodes and A. speciosa, of North America, have astringent, anthelmintic, and tonic qualities; the leaves and pods are reputed anodyne, emollient, and antasthmatic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Catalpa (kat-al'pah). A genus of bignoniaceous trees. C. bignonioi'des, of the United States, affords seeds used in asthma. Dose of tincture, 2 dr. (?.s c.c.).
  43. Cb - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cb. B. Abbreviation for Chirurtia Baccalaweui, Bachelor of Surgery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cb. Chemical symbol of columbium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cb. Chemical symbol of columbium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cb. Chemical symbol of Columbium.
  44. Cedrela - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cedrela (scd'-re-lak) [«rfCailcedra). c. rosmarinus, of Indo-China, and c. toona, of India, are among the species that afford active medicines.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cedrela (sed'rel-ah). A genus of trees of the order Melia'cea, mostly tropical, and misnamed cedar. C. fcbrif'uga, of Java, and other species, have valuable medicinal qualities.
  45. Cel - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cel. Abbreviation for Celsius, scale of thermometer.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cel. Abbreviation for Celsius. (The Celsius thermometric scale.)
  46. Cephaelis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cephaelis (sef-a-e'lis). A genus of plants. See ipecac.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cephaelis (sef-a-e'lis). A genus of plants. See ipecac.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cephaelis (sef-ah-el'is) [G. kephale, head, + tilo, I press.] A genus of tropical plants of the order Rubiacea, two species of which, C. ipecacuan'ha and c. acumina'ta, furnish the drug ipecac.
  47. Cereus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Cereus (se're-us). A genus of cactaceous plants. C. grnndillorus. Night-blooming ccreus; indigenous to the West Indies and growing in Mexico. Sometimes used in cardiac disease. [Lat., waxen, containing wax.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cereus (se're-us) [L. " waxen "]. A genus of cactaceous plants. C. grandiflo'rus, night-blooming cereus, is a cardiant. Dose of tincture, 15-20 min. (1-1.333 c.c.); of fjuidextract, 5-10 min. (0.32-0.65 c.c.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ce'reus. A genus of cacti. C. divarica'tus, the juice is anthelmintic and diuretic, and locally vesicating. C. flagellifor'mis, a species the juice of which is reputed to be anthelmintic. C. geometri'zans, the fruit is diuretic. C. grandlflo'rus, night-blooming cereus; see cactus.
  48. Chain - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Chain (tshan). In chemistry, a method of linking together the atoms of a compound, closed C, several atoms linked together so as to form a ring. Such compounds are related to benzene and are known as aromatic, cyclic, or coal-tar compounds.
  49. Chian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Chian (Hi'-an). Pertaining to Chios, an island in the jEgean Sea. C. turpentine. See terebinlhina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Chian (ki'an). Pertaining to the island of Chios. See turpentine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Chian (ki'an). Pertaining to the island of Chios. See turpentine.
  50. Cicuta - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cicuta (si-ku'tah) [L.]. A genus of poisonous umbelliferous plants. C. macula'la and C. bulbif'era. plants of North America, also C. mro'sa, water-hemlock, of the Old World, have the properties of conium, but are not used in official medicine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cicu'ta. A genus of umbelliferous plants, sometimes confused with Conium. C. viro'sa, waterhemlock, a plant resembling hemlock, or conium, in its properties.
  51. Ciliata - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ciliata (sil-e-a'tah). A class of infusoria characterized by the presence of cilia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cilia'ta. A class of Infusoria in which cilia are present in all stages of existence.
  52. Cimex - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cimex (si'meks), pi. cimi'ca [L. " bug "]. A genus of insects. C. lectula'rius, the bedbug: used homeopathically. C. rotuiula'tus, a tropical species of bedbug which acts as the host of Herpelomona* donmani, the parasite of kala-azar, and by its bite transmits that disease to man.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ci'mex [L. bedbug.] Clinocoris, a genus of insects, family Cimicidce; bedbug. C. cilia'tus, a small species indigenous in Russia. C. lectula'rius, Acanthia leciularia, the ordinary bedbug. C. macroceph'alus, C. rotundatus. C. rotunda'tus, the Indian bedbug, of large size, found in Mauritius, Reunion, India, Malay, and neighboring parts of southern Asia.
  53. Cistus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cistus (sis'-tus) [ftaros, the rock-rose]. A genus of plants of the order Cistacea, growing in the old world. C. areticus, C. cyprius, C. ladaniferus, and C. ledon, afford the resinous substance labdanum, or ladanum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cis'tus [G. kistos, the rock-rose.] A genus of plants in the Mediterranean region. C. cre'ticus and C. ladanif'erus furnish the resinous substance labdanum or ladanum, formerly employed in bronchitis and dysentery.
  54. Cladonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cladonia (klad-o'-ne-ah) [x\i5ot, a branch]. A genus of lichens. C. rangiferina, the reindeer-moss: a lichen that grows extensively in Asia, Europe and N. America. It is used as a food in famine-seasons, and is locally distilled, affording an alcoholic spirit.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Clado'nia. A genus of lichens. C. pyxliliita. A species commen in woods and hedge banks. It was formerly used in intermittent fevers and in whooping-cough.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cladonia (kla-do'ne-ah) [Gr. xXdio? branch]. A genus of lichens. C. rangiferi'na, reindeer moss, was formerly used as a stomachic and pectoral: alcohol is distilled from it.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Clado'nia [G. kladon, a branch.] A genus of lichens, of which one species, C. rangiferi'na, reindeer moss, has been used in bronchitis.
  55. Cladosporium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cladosporium (klad-o-spo're-um). A genus of fungi. C. cancrog'enes. Same as canceromyces. C. madagascarien'se causes a condition marked by gummatous nodules. C. manso'ni causes tinea nigra.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cladosporium (klad-o-spo'rl-um) [G. klados. a branch, + sporos, seed.] A genus of fungi having greenish conidiophores with oval or round spores. C. cancerog'enes, canceromyces. C. madagascarien'se, a species producing gummalike nodules. C. man'soni, a species causing the lesions of tinea nigra.
  56. Claviceps - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Claviceps (klav'-is-eps) [data; caput, head). A genus of fungi. C. purpurea, the fungus producing the ergot of rye.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Claviceps (klav'is-eps) [L. cla'va dub + cafput head]. A genus of parasitic fungi which infest the seeds of various plants. C. purpu'rea is the essential element of the common ergot.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Clav'iceps [L. clava, club, + caput, head.] A genus of fungi producing smut in cereals. C. purpu'rea, the fungus of rye which produces ergot.
  57. Coccidioides - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Coccidioides (kok"sid-e-oi'dez). A genus of sporpzoan parasites. C. immifis, C. pyo1 genes are said to be the cause of pseudotuberculosis of the skin and coccidioidal granuloma.
  58. Coccoloba - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Coccoloba (kok-ol'o-bah) [L. coccofobi \ A genus
  59. Colchicum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Colchicum (kol'che-kum or kol'ke-kum) (L.]. A genus of liliaceous plants. The bulb and seed of C. autumna'lr, a European and Asiatic plant, are cathartic, emetic, and locally irritant, and in large doses poisonous. They are used in gout, rheumatism, and rheumatic affections, such as tonsillitis, pharyngitis, etc. Dose of powdered root, 2-8 gr. (0.13-0.52 gm.); of powdered seeds, 1-5 gr. (0.065-0.32 gm.); of fluidextract of seed, 1-5 min. (0.06-0.3 c.c.): of tincture of seed, 10-30 min. (0.666-2 c.c.); of extract of root, J-ii gr. (0.033-0.09 gm.); of fluidextract of root, 2-5 min. (0.1330.333 c.c.); of wine of root, 5-15 min. (0.333-1 c.c.).
  60. Collinsonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Collinsonia (kol-in-so'-ne-ah) [Peter Collinson, English botanist. 1694-1768]. A genus of labiate iierbs. C. canadensis, stoneroot, healall, is a coarse plant with a disagreeable smell; it has tonic, diuretic, and diaphoretic properties. Dose 15-60 gr. (1-4 Cc.) in decoction; of the fluidextract 10 min.-i dr. (0.65-4.0 Cc.); of the tincture (i : 10) \-2 dr. (2-8
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Collinsonia (kol-in-so'ne-ah) [after Peter Collinson, 1604-1768]. A genus of labiate herbs. C. canaden'sis, stone-root or richweed, is tonic and diuretic. Dose of herb (in decoction), 15-60 gr. (1-4 gm.); of fluidextract, 10-40 min. (0.65-2.3 c.c.); of tincture, i-2 fl.dr. (2-8 c.c.).
  61. Color - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Color. Abbreviation for L. colore'tur, let it be colored.
  62. Comp - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Comp. Abbreviation for L. eompos'itui, compound.
  63. Conium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Conium (ko-ne'um) [L.; Gr. nufftov]. A genus of umbelliferous plants: the hemlocks. The dried unripe fruit of C. macula'turn, poison hemlock, is a narcotic and sedative, used mainly as a palliative in neuralgia and cancerous sores; also in chronic rheumatism, asthma, and phthisis. Dose of alcoholic extract, $-2 gr. (0.033-0.133 gm.); of fluidextract, 2-5 min. (0.133-0.333 c.c.); of tincture, 5-30 min. (0.333-2 c.c.).
  64. Contin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Contin. Abbreviation for L. conlinuf'lur, let it be continued.
  65. Cort - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cort. Abbreviation for L. cor'tex, bark.
  66. Corydalis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Corydalis (ko-rid'al-is). 1. The genus Cysiocapnos of Boerhaave. 2. A genus of the Fumaricae. C. formosa. Turkey corn, turkey pea; indigenous to the middle and western United States. The root contains corydalin and is supposed to be tonic and diuretic. [Gr., korydalis, the crested lark.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Corydalis (kor-id'al-is) [L., from Gr. xopus helmet]. A genus of fumariaceous herbs, of which various species are actively medicinal. C. formo'sa is considered a good antiperiodic and diuretic. Dose of fluidextract, 10-40 min. (0.666-3.666 c.c.).
  67. Craigia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Craigia (kra'ge-ah) [Charles F. Craig, U. S. Army surgeon, born 1872]. A genus of flagellate protozoans, two species of which, C. hom'inis and C. mi'grans, inhabit the intestine and cause dysenterylike symptoms. This genus was originally named Paramtrba by Craig.
  68. Crotalus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cro'talus [G. krotalon, a rattle.] A genus of rattlesnakes.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Crotalus (kro'tal-us). A genus of rattlesnakes of the family Viperidae. [Gr, krotalon, rattle.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Crotalus (kro'tal-us) IL., from Gr. «pora,W rattle]. A genus of rattlesnakes; also a homeopathic preparation of the virus of the rattlesnake.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cro'talus [G. krotalon, a rattle.] A genus of rattlesnakes.
  69. Cryptococcus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Cryptococcus (krip-to-kok'-ui). A genus of Saccharomyces. Same as Blasiomyces.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cryptococcus (krip-to-kok'us) [G. kryptos, concealed, + kokkos, berry.] A genus of fungi reproducing by budding only, no spores being in evidence; Blastomyca, Zymonema. C. dermatitis, the cause of one form of blastomycosis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Cryptococcus (krip-to-kok'us). bye: Blastomyces dcrmatitidis. A genus of *:t family Saccharomycaceae, the d^i Ascomyceles, and the phylum Fungi. C Gilchrist I. A species producing chroo t ulceration, dermatitis, and general infection in man. C. hominls. A specs found in abscesses by Busse. C. Plim merl, O. degencrans. A saprophytic species found in malignant tumors. [Gr, kryplos, concealed, 4- kokkos, betTy.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cryptococcus (krip-to-kok'us) [G. kryptos, concealed, + kokkos, berry.] A genus of fungi reproducing by budding only, no spores being in evidence; Blastomyca, Zymonema. C. dermatitis, the cause of one form of blastomycosis.
  70. Cunila - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Cunila (ku-ni'lah). A genus of labiate plant*. C. maria'na, of North America (dittany), is diuretic and diaphoretic. Dose of tincture, 5-20 min. (0.333-1.333 c.c.).
  71. Cynanchum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Cynanchum (si-nang'kum) [G. kynanchl, sorethroat.] A genus of plants of southern and middle Europe, one species of which furnishes vincetoxicum.*
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Cynanchum (si-nan'chum). A genus of asclepiadaceous plants. <'. acutum, C. moiispeliacum. A species growing in southern France, Spain, Italy, and Greece; said to furnish a spurious scammony. C. vlncetoxlcum. White swallowwort. The root was once esteemed as a counterpoison. It is emetic, especially when fresh, and in large doses produces inflammation of the stomach.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Cynanchum (si-nang'kum) [G. kynanchl, sorethroat.] A genus of plants of southern and middle Europe, one species of which furnishes vincetoxicum.*
  72. DR - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      DR. Abbreviation for reaction of degeneration.
  73. Daucus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Daucus (daw'kus;. A genus of plants of the order Umbellifera, containing the carrot, D. carota.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Daucus (daw'kus) [L.; Gr. Savors carrot]. A genus of umbelliferous plants. /'. cart/to, is the carrot. See carrot.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Daucus (daw'kus;. A genus of plants of the order Umbellifera, containing the carrot, D. carota.
  74. Demodex - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Demodex (de/-mo-aeks) [£irM6*> fat; £*;£. an insect]. A Menus of parasitic insects. D. folliculorum, the pimple-mite, a minute parasite found in the sebaceous follicles, particularly of the face. It probably does not produce any symptoms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Demodex (dem'o-deks) [Gr. hijiim fat + Hit worm]. A genus of mites or acarids. D. folliculo'rum, the pimple-mite; a species found in hair-follicles and in sebaceous secretions, especially of the face and nose. See comedo.
  75. Dipterocarpus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Dipterocarpus (dip-ter-o-kar'-pus) [Slfrtpot, twowinged; Kapfla, fruit]. A genus of trees, chiefly found in southern Asia, some of which furnish gurjun balsam.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Dipterocar'pus [G. dipleros, with two wings, + karpos, fruit.] A genus of trees, some East Indian species of which furnish gurjun balsam.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Dipterocarpus (dip"ter-o-kar'pu5) [Gr. jln-repot two-winged + nauirm fruit]. A genus of tree* from southern Asia, affording gurjun balsam. See gurjun balsam, under balsam.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Dipterocar'pus [G. dipleros, with two wings, + karpos, fruit.] A genus of trees, some East Indian species of which furnish gurjun balsam.
  76. Dipteryx - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Dipteryx (dip'ter-ix). See Tonka.
  77. Div - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Div. Abbreviation for L. dit'ide, divide.
  78. Dolichos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Dolichos (dol'ik-os). A genus of leguminous plants of the tribe Phaseohtf. dollchl piibc.s. The hairs of the poJof Mucttna pruriais. [Gr., dolichos, long-!
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Dolichos (dol'ik-os). Same as Uucuna.
  79. Drosera - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Drosera (drosVrah) [Gr. Spoo-ipot dewy]. A genus of plants; sundew. D. rotundifo'lia and D. lonftfo'lia have been found useful in tuberculosis
  80. Ecballium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Ecballium (ek-bal'-e-um). See elaterium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ecball'ium [G. ekballo, I throw out.] A genus of plants with the single species E. elatfrium; see elaterium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ecball'ium [G. ekballo, I throw out.] A genus of plants with the single species E. elatfrium; see elaterium.
  81. Elaps - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Elaps (e'laps). A genus of poisonous snakes, including the harlequin snakes of North America and the coral snakes of tropical America.
  82. Empusa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Empusa (cm-pu'-zah) llfirouae,, a hobgoblin]. A genus of fungi parasitic on living insects and causing their death.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Empu'sa [G. Empottsa, a polymorphous hobgoblin
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Empusa (em-pu'sah). A genus of vegetable parasites. E. mua'cee, a species developing in the bodies of flies, thus destroying them.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Empu'sa [G. Empottsa, a polymorphous hobgoblin
  83. Entada - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Entada (en'tad-ah). See bayogo.
  84. Erigeron - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Erigeron (e-rij'er-on) [Gr. fipiyiawv early old). Fleabane; a genus of composite-flowered plants. The leaves and tops of E. canaden'sis, E. t>kU
  85. Euglena - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Eugle'na [G. eu, well, + glene, eyeball.] A genus of infusorians, characterized by the presence of a minute spot of differentiated ectoplasm sensitive to light.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Euglena (u-glc'nah) [Gr. «5 well -f- y\ipni socket of a joint]. A genus of infusorian animals. E. vir'idis is found in stagnant pools.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Eugle'na [G. eu, well, + glene, eyeball.] A genus of infusorians, characterized by the presence of a minute spot of differentiated ectoplasm sensitive to light.
  86. Fabricius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Fabricius (fab-ris'e-us), Hieronymus [It. Geronimo Fabrizio]. An Italian anatomist and surgeon, born 1537; died 1619. He was a pupil of Fallopius and was the teacher of Harvey.
  87. Fletcherism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Fletcherism (flctsh'-tr-iim) [Horace Fletcher, American dietitian, 1849- ]. The thorough mastication of solid food, until all taste of the food is lost. . flex (fleks) [JUilere, to bend]. To bend.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Fletch'erism [Horace Fletcher, American author, 1849—1919.] A dietary system advocated by Horace Fletcher, consisting in most complete mastication, carried to the point where all taste of the food is lost, and in abstention from food until driven thereto by hunger.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Fletch'erism [Horace Fletcher, American author, 1849—1919.] A dietary system advocated by Horace Fletcher, consisting in most complete mastication, carried to the point where all taste of the food is lost, and in abstention from food until driven thereto by hunger.
  88. Fusarium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Fusarium (fu-za'rf-um) [L. fusus spindle.] A genus of fungi. • F. equi'num, a spew«s suspected of causing a mange in horses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Fusarium (fu-sa're-um). A genus of molds belonging to the class of Ascomycetes. t. equi'num is believed to be the cause of itch disease, a dermatomycosis in horses in Oregon.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Fusarium (fu-za'rf-um) [L. fusus spindle.] A genus of fungi. • F. equi'num, a spew«s suspected of causing a mange in horses.
  89. Gadus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ga'dus [L. codfish.] A genus of . fishes containing the cod, G.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ga'dus [L. codfish.] A genus of . fishes containing the cod, G.
  90. Gaertner - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Gaertner. See Gartner.
  91. Gasserian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Gasserian (gas-e'-re-an) [referring to Achilles Pirminius Gasscrius, German surgeon. 1505-1577). G. artery. I. A branch given off by the internal carotid to the Gasserian ganglion. 2. A branch of the middle meningeal artery to the Gasserian ganglion. G. fonranel. See fontanel, Casson's. G. ganglion, the ganglion of the sensory root of the fifth cranial nerve. See ganglion, Gasserian.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Gasse'rian. Relating to Johann Laurentius Gasser, German surgeon (1505-1577), noting the G. ganglion, ganglion* semilunare.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Gasse'rian. Relating to Johann Laurentius Gasser, German surgeon (1505-1577), noting the G. ganglion, ganglion* semilunare.
  92. Glossina - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Glossi'na [G. glossa, tongue.] A genus of biting flies, tsetse flies. G. mor'sitans, the agent in the transmission of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite of nagana, a fatal cattle disease of South Africa, and of T. rhodesiense, one of the pathogenic agents of sleeping sickness. G. pallid'ipes, a species which, like G. morsitans, also transmits the parasite of nagana. G. palpa'lis, a species of G. which transmits Trypanosoma gambitnse, one of the pathogenic parasites of sleeping sickness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Glossi'na [G. glossa, tongue.] A genus of biting flies, tsetse flies. G. mor'sitans, the agent in the transmission of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite of nagana, a fatal cattle disease of South Africa, and of T. rhodesiense, one of the pathogenic agents of sleeping sickness. G. pallid'ipes, a species which, like G. morsitans, also transmits the parasite of nagana. G. palpa'lis, a species of G. which transmits Trypanosoma gambitnse, one of the pathogenic parasites of sleeping sickness.
  93. Gr - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Gr. ovpop urine]. The occurrence of cerebri
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Gr.t soon, an animal, + logos, understanding.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Gr. rfxap liver]. A mass of vascular and connective tissue in the embryo which develops into the
  94. Grindelia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Grindelia (grin-de'le-ah) [H. Grindd, 1776-1836]. A genus of American composite-flowered plants. The leaves and tops of G. robus'ta, of the western United States, are used mainly in bronchitis, asthma, and in various coughs. Dose of extract, 5-15 gr. (0.333-1 gm.); of fluideztract, 10-60 min. (0.666-4 c.c.).
  95. Guinea-worm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Guinea-worm. Filaria medinensis, a nematode worm of the tropics, occasionally parasitic in human tissues. G. disease, a disease caused by the presence of Filaria medinensis in the subcutaneous cellular tissue of various parts of the body, particularly, the feet and legs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Guin'ea-worm. Filaria medinensis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Guin'ea-worm. Filaria medinensis.
  96. Heloderma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Heloderma (he-lo-dcr'-mah) [i^of, nail; £skin]. A genus of lizards. H. horridum. of Mexico, and H. suspectum, of Arizona (called Gila Monster), are said to be the only known species of venomous lizards.
  97. Hippomane - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Hippomane (hip-om'a-ne) [G. hippos, horse, + mania, frenzy.] A genus of plants of the order Euphorbiaceai. H. mancinell'a, a West Indian tree furnishing a poisonous resin, manchineel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Hippomane (hip-om'a-ne) [Gr. Itttoi horse (ftavla madness]. A genus of euphorbiaceous trees. H. inancinel'la is the highly poisonous manchineel tree: used in homeopathy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Hippomane (hip-om'a-ne) [G. hippos, horse, + mania, frenzy.] A genus of plants of the order Euphorbiaceai. H. mancinell'a, a West Indian tree furnishing a poisonous resin, manchineel.
  98. Hor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Hor. un. spatio. Abbreviation for L. ho'rauni'us spa'tio, at the end of an hour.
  99. Ht - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ht. Abbreviation for total hyperopia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ht. Abbreviation for total hyperopia.
  100. Hydrocotyle - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Hydrocotyle (hi-dro-kot'i-le) [G. hyddr, water, + kotyle, cup.] A genus of plants of the order Umbellifene. H. asiat'ica, shilling-grass, Indian pennywort, a shrub growing in wet places in tropical regions, employed as an alterative in doses of gr. 8-15 (0.5-1.0). H. contel'la, South African pennywort, used in dysentery.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Hydrocotyle (hi-dro-kot'il-e). Pennywort; a genus of umbelliferous plants. H. aslatica. Asiatic water pennywort. The leaves are toasted and given in infusion in the bowel complaints of children. [Gr., ydor, water, + kolyte, a cup.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Hydrocotyle (hi-dro-kofil-e) [Gr. ttup water + *ori-,\ij cup]. A genus of umbelliferous herbs. //. astafica is serviceable in syphilis, leprosy, and skin diseases. Dose, 8-15 gr. (0.5-1 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Hydrocotyle (hi-dro-kot'i-le) [G. hyddr, water, + kotyle, cup.] A genus of plants of the order Umbellifene. H. asiat'ica, shilling-grass, Indian pennywort, a shrub growing in wet places in tropical regions, employed as an alterative in doses of gr. 8-15 (0.5-1.0). H. contel'la, South African pennywort, used in dysentery.
  101. Hyphomycetes - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Hyphomycetes (hi-fo-mi-sef-Mz) {60^, web; ^Kijt, fungus]. A group of fungi having the spores on prominent threads; the molds.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Hyphomycetes (hi-fo-mi-se'tez) [G. hyphe, web, + mykes, fungus.] Filamentous fungi composed of branched or unbranched threads, moulds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Hyphomycetes (hi-fo-mi-se'tez) [G. hyphe, web, + mykes, fungus.] Filamentous fungi composed of branched or unbranched threads, moulds.
  102. IK - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      IK [Ger. immun-korper.] Spengler's tuberculin.* Also a preparation, on the same principle as the tuberculin, for use in epidemic influenza.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      IK [Ger. immun-korper.] Spengler's tuberculin.* Also a preparation, on the same principle as the tuberculin, for use in epidemic influenza.
  103. Ice - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ice. Water congealed by a temperature below 32° F. (o° C.). i. bag, a rubber bug in which cracked ice is put; employed as a means for the local application of cold. i. cap, an i. bag made of such a shape as to be readily fitted over the head.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Ice. Frozen water. 1. bag, 1. cap, 1. compress, I. poultice. A rubber bag partially fillea with broken ice. let-land moss. A lichen of the genus
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ice (b). Water solidified by the reduction of its temperature to below o" Centigrade: used as a refrigerant, i.-bag. i.-cap, i compress, appliances for the therapeutic application of ice.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ice. Water congealed by a temperature below 32° F. (o° C.). i. bag, a rubber bug in which cracked ice is put; employed as a means for the local application of cold. i. cap, an i. bag made of such a shape as to be readily fitted over the head.
  104. Illicium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Illicium (il-isVum) |!..|. A genus of magnoliaceous trees and shrubs. The fruit of /. ve'rum is star-anise. See anise, star-.
  105. Infusoria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Infuso'ria [L. infusum, infusion, the term being originally applied to all animalcules found in infusions or stagnant waters.] Ciliophora; a subphylum (or class) of Protosoa, the members of which have a generative micronucleus and a vegetative macronucleus, and are provided with cilia, either free or fused into membranes; the cilia may be permanent or present only in the early stages.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Infusoria (in-fu-so're-ah) |L., pi.). A group of microscopic protozoan animals, many species of. icteroi'des, a species believed to be the cause of yellow fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Leptospira (lep-to-spi'rah) [G. leptos, thin, + speira, coil.] A genus of spirochetes. L. icterohtemorrha'giae, a species regarded as the pathogenic organism in Weil's disease. L. icteroi'des, a species asserted by Noguchi to be the pathogenic organism in yellow fever.
  106. LiBr - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      LiBr. Lithium bromide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      LiBr. Lithium bromid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      LiBr. Lithium bromide.
  107. Lint - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Lint. Abbreviation for L. lin'leum, lint. lintin (lin'tin). A loose fabric of prepared absorbent cotton: used in dressing wounds. I in tine (lin'ten). A cotton lint from which the oil
  108. Listerism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Listerism (lis'-ter-izm). A general name for the antiseptic and aseptic treatment of wounds according to the principles first enunciated by Lord Lister.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      "Lis'terism. Lister's* method; the general principles, and practice of the antiseptic, and later aseptic management of wounds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      "Lis'terism. Lister's* method; the general principles, and practice of the antiseptic, and later aseptic management of wounds.
  109. Lumbricus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Lumbricus (lum'-brik-us) [L.]. A genus of worms, including the common earthworm and certain intestinal worms. The latter are now termed A scarides.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Lumbricus (lum-bri'kus). PI. lumbrici. 1. A genus of annelids, including the earthworm. 2. An intestinal parasitic worm. [Lat.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Lumbricus (lum-bri'kus), pi. lumbri'ci [1. |. I. A genus of annelids, including the earthworm. 2. The ascaris (q. v.) or round intestinal worm.
  110. Meningitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Meningitis
  111. Menispermum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Menispermum (men-is-per'mum) [Gr. \itym moon + ffTrtpMO seed). A genus of plants. The rnizome and roots of .I/, canaden'se, moonseed or yellow parilla, are used like sarsaparilla, as a tonic and alterative. Dose of fluidextract, 30-60 min.
  112. Mitt - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Mitt. sang. Abbreviation for L. mit'it san'guinem, bleed.
  113. Monarda - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Monarda (mon-ar'dah). Horsemint; a genus of herbs. M. punctata. M. punctata., M. punctula. Horsemint; a species growing from New Jersey to Louisiana. The herb is stimulant and carminative, but is rarely used. It is rich in volatile oil which is a source of thymol. [Mcnardcs, a Spanish botanist of the sixteenth century.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Monarda (mo-nar'dah). A genus of fragrant labiate plants, comprising M. fistula'sa, wild bergamot; M. did'yma, bee-balm; M. sylres'lris, and !/ puncta'ta, horsemint. The last is diaphoretic, carminative, stimulant, emmenagogue, and rubefacient. Its volatile oil (o'leum monar'da) is used like oil of peppermint. Dose of oil, 2-3 min. (0.133-0.2 c.c.).
  114. Monsonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Monsonia (mor-so'ne-ah). A genus of African and Asiatic p.-raniaceous plants. Some of the species are us>d in medicine as astringents, monster (nwn'ster) [L. mon'slrum]. A fetus malformed »r with an excess or deficiency of parts; a tentism. autositic m., one capable of independent life, compound m., a monster made up Jf parts of more than one individual, double o. Same as twin m. endocymic m., a monster which never comes to birth, but is retained and forms the basis of a dermoid tumor. Gila DB., a venomous lizard, Htloder'ma hor'ridum, of Metico and the southwestern part of the United State-, parasitic m., an imperfect fetus attachid to another and unable to exist alone, triplet m., a monster containing parts of three individuals, twin m., a monster consisting of tro individuals joined at some point, monstriparity (mon-stri-par'it-e) '.monster + L. nr'nf to give birth to). The act of giving birth to a monster.
  115. Mor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Mor.i x -Ax'enfeld diplobacill'us [Victor Morax, Paris physician, contemporary; Alexander Axenfeld, Paris physician, nineteenth century.] Bacillus conjunctivitidis, an organism causing conjunctivitis of a rather mild type.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Mor. diet. Abbreviation for I . mo're dic'to, in the manner directed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Mor.i x -Ax'enfeld diplobacill'us [Victor Morax, Paris physician, contemporary; Alexander Axenfeld, Paris physician, nineteenth century.] Bacillus conjunctivitidis, an organism causing conjunctivitis of a rather mild type.
  116. Mycobacterium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Mycobacte'rium [G. mykls, fungus, + bakterion, rod.] A genus of Mycobacteriacea, which Includes many organisms usually denominated Bacillus, such as those of tuberculosis, leprosy, diphtheria. Influenza, glanders, etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Mycobacte'rium [G. mykls, fungus, + bakterion, rod.] A genus of Mycobacteriacea, which Includes many organisms usually denominated Bacillus, such as those of tuberculosis, leprosy, diphtheria. Influenza, glanders, etc.
  117. Mycoderma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Mycoderma (mi-ko-der'-mak) (myco-; Mpua, skin]. A genus of fungi forming membranes upon or in fermenting liquids. M. aceti, the microorganism of acetous fermentation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Mycoder'ma [G. mykis, fungus, + derma, skin.] A genus of fungi, to which belongs the mother of vinegar, M- aceti.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Mycoder'ma [G. mykis, fungus, + derma, skin.] A genus of fungi, to which belongs the mother of vinegar, M- aceti.
  118. NaOH - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      NaOH. Sodium hydroxide, caustic soda.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      NaOH. Sodium hydroxide, caustic soda.
  119. Nectandra - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Nectandra (nck-tan'drah) [Gr. vatrap nectar + O.i-thi man, anther]. See Mii-rm.
  120. Nocardia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Nocardia [E. I. E. Nocard, French veterinarian, 1850—1903.) A genus of fungi or hyphomycetes containing a number of species parasitic in man and animals; under this term are grouped various organisms usually called Aclinomyas. Cladothrix, Streptothrix, etc.. and by some even Bacillus tuberculosis. N. astero'ides, Cladotkrii asteroides, found in mycetoma. N. bo'Tit, Actinomyces bovis, the organism of true actinomycosis. N. farcin'ica, A ctinomyees farcinica. the specific organism of a cattle disease in Guadaloupe. N. foers'teri, Sireptothrix foersleri. Oosporafoersteri. masses of which in the lacrymal canal were mistaken by Desmarre for concretions. N. isra'eli, Streptothrix israeli, found in true actinomycosis. N. madu'ra, Streptotkrii madurte, the cause of white mycetoma. H. minutis'sima, Microsporon minulissimum. the pathogenic agent in erythrasma. N. poncefi, a species causing pseudoactinomycosis. N. pnlmona'lis, a species appearing in some stages in the form of bacilli or coccoid bodies, the cause of a form of pseudotuberculosis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Nocardia (no-kar'de-ah). Syn.: Actimomyces, Streptothrix. One of the subdivisions of the order Hyphomycetes of the Fungi. N. astcroides. See Aciinomjcti. N. aim-it. Found in cases of ulceramc conjunctivitis. N. bovis. See Actatomycei. N. lira sinensis. Found ir mycetoma of the leg in Brazil. X. buccalis. Produces stomatitis resembiirg thrush. N. Foersteri. Found in concretions called davyolithes in the lacriraii canal. N. homlnls. Found in multiple abscesses and appendicitis in man. S. Israeli. The anaerobic species found ia human and bovine actinomycosis. X. madurae. The cause of Vincent's white mycetoma. N. Pelletleri. The cause cf a type of mycetoma with small red grairs common in Senegal. N. pulmoualis. This species causes a type of pseudotuberculosis. N. tennis. Found in a tropica: nodular affection of the hair. The^e forms produce threads showing true branching with fragmentation and the formation of conidia, which serve as spores and cause pseudotubercles in human beings.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Nocardia (no-kar'de-ah) (Edmond Isidore ittienne Nocard, French veterinarian, 1850-1003]. A genus of trichomycetes characterized by true branching. Under this genus are now included various organisms formerly imcluded under the genera Acti.nomyces, Streptotkrix, and Cladolhrix. N. asteroi del, Cladotririx asteroides. N. bo vis, Actinomyces bovis. N. farcin'ica, Actinomyces farcinica. N. tors'teri, Streptothrix fcerstcri. N. isrca'li, Streptothrix isra-li. N. madu'rse, Streptothrix madura.• N. rninutis'sima, Microsporon minutissimum. N. ponce t'i, a species causing pseudo-actinpmycosis. N. pulmonalis, a species causing pseudotuberculosis. N. ten'uis. See under Irichonocardiasis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Nocardia [E. I. E. Nocard, French veterinarian, 1850—1903.) A genus of fungi or hyphomycetes containing a number of species parasitic in man and animals; under this term are grouped various organisms usually called Aclinomyas. Cladothrix, Streptothrix, etc.. and by some even Bacillus tuberculosis. N. astero'ides, Cladotkrii asteroides, found in mycetoma. N. bo'Tit, Actinomyces bovis, the organism of true actinomycosis. N. farcin'ica, A ctinomyees farcinica. the specific organism of a cattle disease in Guadaloupe. N. foers'teri, Sireptothrix foersleri. Oosporafoersteri. masses of which in the lacrymal canal were mistaken by Desmarre for concretions. N. isra'eli, Streptothrix israeli, found in true actinomycosis. N. madu'ra, Streptotkrii madurte, the cause of white mycetoma. H. minutis'sima, Microsporon minulissimum. the pathogenic agent in erythrasma. N. poncefi, a species causing pseudoactinomycosis. N. pnlmona'lis, a species appearing in some stages in the form of bacilli or coccoid bodies, the cause of a form of pseudotuberculosis.
  121. Nt - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Nt. Chemical symbol of niton,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Nt. The symbol of niton.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Nt. Chemical symbol of niton,
  122. Nuphar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Nuphar (Nym'phsea) ad'vena, N. kalmia na (nu'far). The yellow pond-lily, or spatter-dock, of North America: the roots are used in preparing poultices for carbuncles.
  123. Onchocerca - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Onchocerca (ong-ko-scr'-kah). A genus of filaria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Onchocerca (on-ko-ser'ka). Oncocerca.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Onchocerca (on-ko-ser'ka). Oncocerca.
  124. Origanum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Origanum (o-rig'an-um). 1. Marjoram; a genus of labiate undershrubs or herbs. 2. Of the U. S. Ph., 1880, the herb of O. vulgare. oil of o. The volatile oil of O. vulgare; an acrid, stimulating oil, of yellowish color and camphoraceous odor, consisting of a terpenc, CioHu, with sometimes small proportions of ordinary camphor. O. majoranu. Sweet marjoram. It has a peculiar aromatic odor and a warm, bitterish taste, and yields tannin and a volatile oil, to which the excitant and mildly tonic properties of the plant are due. O. vulgare. Wild marjoram. The herb was formerly used as a diaphoretic and emmenagogue and externally in poultices and fomentations. It is stimulant and mildly tonic. [Gr., origanon.}
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Origanum (o-rig'an-um) [L.; Gr. bplyanv]. A genus of labiate plants. 0. vulgtfre, wild marjoram, affords a stimulant volatile oil (o'leum orig'ani): used mainly in veterinary practice and in liniments. 0. majora'na, sweet marjoram, also affords a similar oil (o'leum majoro/iut). origin (pr'ij-in) [L. or?go beginning]. The source or beginning of anything, especially the more fixed end or attachment of a muscle, as distinguished from its insertion, apparent o., ectal o., superficial o., the point at which a cranial nerve emerges from the surface of the brain, deep O., ental o., the true beginning of the brain-fibers of a nerve within the substance of the brain, orinasal (or-in-a'zal). See oronasal. orinotherapy (o-ri-no-ther'ap-e) [Gr. opetcot pertaining to mountains ! Otpairfla treatment). Treatment by living in high, mountainous regions. ormizet (or-miz-etO. A proprietary astringent preparation of clay saturated with formic acid.
  125. Oryza - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Oryza (o-ri'zah). The rice plant; a genus of grasses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Oryza (o-ri'zah) [L.; Gr. Spvfa rice]. A genus of cereal plants. O. soti'va produces rice.
  126. Paramecium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Parame'cium [G. paramekls, rather long.] A genus of infusorians, the members of which are of rather elongated form and some of large size even visible to the naked eye.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Parame'cium [G. paramekls, rather long.] A genus of infusorians, the members of which are of rather elongated form and some of large size even visible to the naked eye.
  127. Parietaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Parieta'ria [L. paries, wall.] A genus of plants, of which the most common species, P. officinalis, wall pellitory, has been employed in domestic practice as a diuretic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Parietaria (par-i-e-ta're-ah). See pcllitory.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Parieta'ria [L. paries, wall.] A genus of plants, of which the most common species, P. officinalis, wall pellitory, has been employed in domestic practice as a diuretic.
  128. Part - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Part. vie. Abbreviation for L. par'tibus vi'cibus, in divided doses.
  129. Parthenium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Parthenium (par -the' -nc -urn) (wafi6tmi, a virgin]. A genus of herbs of the order Composite. P. hysttropkorus contains several alkaloids, one of which, called pnrthrnhit', seems to be the active principle of the plant and has been used as an antipyretic and an ti neuralgic. P. integrifolium, prairie-dock, a perennial plant of the southern United States, la used as an antipcriodic. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Parthenium (par-the'ne-um). A genus of composite plants. P. hysteroph'orus contains parthenicin and parthenin. P. integrifo'lium, the prairie-dock, is antiperiodic.
  130. Pasteurella - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Pasteurel'la. A genus of schizomycetes which includes all the microorganisms of the hemorrhagic septicemic group.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Pasteurella (pas-ter-el'ah). A genus of Barteriacer, in the form of rod-shaped cells. Gram-negative, and showing bipolar staining. It includes the organism of bubonic plague and of the hemorrhagic septicemias of animals, organisms formerly ineluded under the genus Bacillus. P. pes'tis. Set Bacillus pesHs bubonica. Other member- of the genus are: P. botisep'tica, P. (halrrit tnUino'nm of chicken cholera, P. runifvliti'da. P. tqmsrp'titt. P. pseudotubfTcula'sis rodm'lium, and P. ttiijep'tte* of swine plague.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Pasteurel'la. A genus of schizomycetes which includes all the microorganisms of the hemorrhagic septicemic group.
  131. Paullinia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Paullin'ia [after C. F. Paullint, German botanist, 1643-1713.] A genus of shrubs of tropical America, of the order Sapindacece. P. sor'bilis, the source of guarana
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Paullinia (pawl-in'e-ah) [L., after C. F. Paullini, 1643-1712]. A genus of sapindaceous plants of tropical America. P. sor'bUis affords guarana (q. v.). P. pinna'ta, of Brazil, is used homeopathically.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Paullin'ia [after C. F. Paullint, German botanist, 1643-1713.] A genus of shrubs of tropical America, of the order Sapindacece. P. sor'bilis, the source of guarana
  132. Pediococcus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Pediococcus (ped"e-o-kok'kus) [Gr. irtSLof instep -1- Koucof berry]. A genus of bacteria. P. ac'idi lac'tici, a species found in malt-mash and haydecoction and generating lactic acid. P. al'bus, a non-pathogenic species found in spring-water. P. auranti'acus, a species found in water and in garden-soil, and forming an orange-yellow pigment. P. cerevis'ia), a species found in beer, generating traces of lactic acid. P. maggio'ra is found in the skin of the foot and in the nasal passages: it is not known to be pathogenic.
  133. Pentastoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Pentastoma (pen-tas-to'-moh) [rirrc. five; o-r^Mo, mouth]. A genus of entozoa. worm-like parasites, generally classed as arthropoda. There are many species, several of which have been found encysted in the human liver and lungs. See linguatula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Pentas'toma [G. pente, five, + stoma, mouth.] A genus of arthropods, usually now called Linguatula. P. denticula'tum, Porocephalus denticulatus, the larva of Linguatula rhinaria, sometimes parasitic in the nose. P. monilifor'mis, Porocephalus moniliformis. P. tenioi'des, Linguatula rhinaria,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Pentastoma (pen-tas'to-mah) [Gr. rip-re five + art'ina mouth]. A genus of endoparasitic, wormlike arthropods. P. constrtc'lum and P. tttnioi'des occur in the human subject. P. denticula'tum is the larva of Lingual'ula rhina'ria, occurring in the nose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Pentas'toma [G. pente, five, + stoma, mouth.] A genus of arthropods, usually now called Linguatula. P. denticula'tum, Porocephalus denticulatus, the larva of Linguatula rhinaria, sometimes parasitic in the nose. P. monilifor'mis, Porocephalus moniliformis. P. tenioi'des, Linguatula rhinaria,
  134. Peronospora - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Peronospora (per-o-nos'-po-rak) [vtp&vij, a pin; ffTfyot. spore]. A genus of fungi producing mildew. P. ferrani is a species that was supposed to cause cholera' P. lutea, one that was once held to be the cause of yellow fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Peronos'pora [G. perone, brooch, + sporos, seed.] A genus of fungi producing mildew, one species of which P. lutea was at one time suggested as the cause of yellow fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Peronospora (per-o-nos'po-rah) [Gr. .ti,;'•;•» point + oiropot seed]. A genus of mildew fungi. P. ferra'ni and P. lu'lea have been supposed to cause yellow fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Peronos'pora [G. perone, brooch, + sporos, seed.] A genus of fungi producing mildew, one species of which P. lutea was at one time suggested as the cause of yellow fever.
  135. Ph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Ph.G. Abbreviation for (i) Graduate in Pharmacy; (2) German Pharmacopoeia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ph. G. I. Abbreviation for Pharmacoposia germanica, German Pharmacopoeia. 2. Abbreviation for graduate in Pharmacy.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Ph.]. liquor hydrargyri perchloridl.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ph.G. i. Abbreviation for Graduate in Pharmacy. 2. Abbreviation for Pharmacoptria germanicar German pharmacopccia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ph. G. I. Abbreviation for Pharmacoposia germanica, German Pharmacopoeia. 2. Abbreviation for graduate in Pharmacy.
  136. Phar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Phar.D. Abbreviation for Pharmacitg Doctor, Doctor of Pharmacy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Phar. D. Abbreviation of Doctor of Pharmacy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Phar. D. Abbreviation of Doctor of Pharmacy.
  137. Physostigma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Physostigma (fi-so-stig'mah) [Gr. fi-aa bellows 1 ariytna. stigma]. A genus of tropical leguminous plants. The poisonous seed of P. venena'sum, Calabar bean, a climbing plant of Africa, contains the alkaloids physostigmin and calabarin. Physostigma is a motor depressant, miotic, and antispasmodic, in large doses producing death by paralysis of respiration. It is employed in tetanus, trismus, and other spasmodic affections; as an expectorant in bronchitis, asthma, and emphysema, and as a stimulant in atonic constipation and dilatation of the stomach. Dose of extract, ]V-i gr. (0.004-0.01 gm.); of fluidextract, 1-3 min. (0.0660.2 c.c.); of tincture, 5-15 min. (0.333-1 c.c.).
  138. Pongamia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Pongamia (pon-ga'me-ah) [Malay pongatn]. A genus of leguminous East Indian trees. P. gla'bra affords a fixed oil (kurung oil, punga oil, pongam oil): used in skin diseases and in rheumatism.
  139. Protophyta - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Protoph'yta [G. prdtos, first, + phyto*. plant; A group of the lowest orders of the vegetable kingdom, including the bacteria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Protophyta (pro-tof'it-ah) [protofhylf]. A group of the vegetable kingdom, including the lore* and simplest plants, such as the bacteria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Protoph'yta [G. prdtos, first, + phyto*. plant; A group of the lowest orders of the vegetable kingdom, including the bacteria.
  140. Pycnanthemum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Pycnan'themum [G. pyknos, thick, + anthemon,
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Pycnanthemum (pik-nan'the-mnm).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Pycnanthemum (pik-nan'the-mum) [Gr. jrwvis dense + HvOctiov bloom]. A genus of labiate American plants, called basil and mountain mini: aromatic and carminative; resembling pennyroyal and spearmint in taste and smell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Pycnan'themum [G. pyknos, thick, + anthemon,
  141. Pyrosoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Pyrosoma (pi-ro-so'-mak). See Piroplasma. P. bigeminum (pi-ro-so'-mah bi-jem'-in-um) [pyrus. pear; ff&na, a body). The parasite which is the cause of Texas fever in cattle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Pyroso'ma [L. pyrum(pirum), pear, + G. somn. body.] Babesia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Pyroso'ma [L. pyrum(pirum), pear, + G. somn. body.] Babesia.
  142. Quint - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Quint. Abbreviation for L. quin'lus, fifth.
  143. Randia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Randia (ran'-de-ah) [Isaac Rand, an English botanist of the eighteenth century). A genus of cinchonaceous shrubs. R. aculeate, of West India; ink-berry, indigo plant. The juice of the fruit is astringent. R. dumetorum, of India; has a poisonous and strongly emetic fruit. R. longiflora, of Bengal; the cortex is used in intermittent fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Randia (ran'de-ah) [after Isaac Rand}. A genus of tropical rutaceous trees and shrubs. The fruit of R. dumeto'rum, of Africa and India (emetic nut), is a powerful emetic. Dose of tincture, 15-60 min. (1-4 c.c.).
  144. Rhipicephalus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Rhipicephalus (ri-pis-ef'-al-us) [ptrit, a fan; «e0aX4, head]. A genus of ticks. R. shipleyi, the brown tick of South Africa, the agent of transmission of Rhodesian cattle disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Rhipiceph'alus [G. rhipis, fan, + kephale, head.] A genus of ticks, several species of which are agents in the infection of cattle and sheep with "coast fever," "heart-water disease," and van
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Rhipiceph'alus [G. rhipis, fan, + kephale, head.] A genus of ticks, several species of which are agents in the infection of cattle and sheep with "coast fever," "heart-water disease," and van
  145. Rhizopoda - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Rhizop'oda [G. rhiza, root, + pous(pod-), foot.] A class of the Sarcodina having pseudopodia of various forms, but without axial filaments; the amebas belong to a subclass of this class.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Rhizopoda (ri-zop'p-dah) [Gr. frlfa root + rovt foot). A subdivision of the Sarcodi'na, having lobose or reticulate pseudopodia, and including the amebx.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Rhizop'oda [G. rhiza, root, + pous(pod-), foot.] A class of the Sarcodina having pseudopodia of various forms, but without axial filaments; the amebas belong to a subclass of this class.
  146. Rhus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Rhus (rm) [gen.,rhois]. [Mi, sumac]. Agenusof shrubs or small trees of the order Anacardiacea. The dried fruit of R. glabra, sumac, constitutes the Kiiut glabra of the U. S. P., and is used as an astringent in Inflammations of the mouth and throat, in the form of a decoction or the official fluidextractum rhois glabra. R. toxicodendron, the poison-ivy, is a powerful irritant and produces in susceptible persons a violent dermatitis with vesicles and intense itching (ivypoisoning). The active agent seems to be an acid called toxicodendric acid. In overdoses taken internally it acts as a narcotic poison. It has been employed in chronic rheumatism and In incontinence of urine. A1, vtncnata, swamp-sumac,isalso poisonous.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Rhus (rus). Sumach; a genus of anacardiaceous trees or shrubs. R. aromatlca. Fragrant (or sweet) sumach; a North American shrub. The acid drupes are edible. It is said to stimulate muscular action in the bladder, uterus, and lower intestine. R. cotinus. Purple-fringed sumach; indigenous to southern Europe and to Arkansas. The yellow wood, hungarian fustic, contains fusetin. The bark has a feeble aromatic odor and an astringent taste. The leaves are used in a wash or gargle for ulcerated mouth or throat. R. glabra. Smooth (or scarlet, or Pennsylvania, or upland) sumach; a shrub indigenous to the United States and Canada. Excrescences on the lower surface of the leaves contain much tannic and gallic acids. The berries, the R. glabra of the U. S. Ph., are astringent and refrigerant. R. radlcans. Poison ivy; a variety (by some authors considered distinct) of R. toxicodendron, with climbing stem and pale green or whitish berries. Its juice is highly poisonous. It is common in damp woods in Canada and the United States. R. toxicodendron. Poison oak; a shrub found in woods and fields and along fences from Canada to Georgia. All parts of the plant, especially the leaves and root, contain a poisonous glucosidal substance, toxicodendrol, which on contact with the human skin produces in most persons redness, itching, swelling, and vesication. The leaves, including those of the variety R. radicans, constitute the R. toxicodendron of the U. S. Ph., 1890. They contain toxicodendrol. R. venenata. Poison sumach; a shrub or tree found in North America and Japan, more poisonous than R. toxicodendron. [Gr., rhous, sumach.]
  147. Saccharin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Saccharin. Benzoyl-sulphonicimide, a coal-tar derivative. It is an intensely sweet, white powder, 200 times as sweet as cane-sugar. It is antiseptic, and is used to disguise the taste of nauseous medicine. It may be used as a sweetening-agent in diabetes and in the treatment of corpulency.
  148. Saponaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Saponaria (sap-o-na'-re-ah) (sapo, soap]. A genus of plants of the order Caryophyllea, S. offifinalis, or soapwort, bouncing-bet, is a species growing wild abundantly in the United States and Europe in the vicinity of houses. The root, rhizome, and stolons are used in gout, syphilis, and as an expectorant. It contains saponin, sapotoxin, sapogenin, etc.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Saponaria (sap-o-na're-ah). Soapwort; » genus of caryophyllaceous herbs. & officinalis. Common soapwort. The roc; and herb are both used, but the root e much the more active. Soaproot coetains over 30 per cent, of saponin, to which its properties are due. [Latsapo, soap.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Saponaria (sa-po-na're-ah). A genus of plants. The root of 5. offitina'lis, or soapwort, has alterative properties and was formerly used in skin diseases.
  149. Saprolegnia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Saproleg'nia [G. sapros, rotten, + legnon, an edge.] A genus of fungi, one species of which, S. ferax, causes a destructive disease in salmon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Saprolegnia (sap-ro-leg'ne-ah) [Gr. aairpbs putrid + \kyvov border). A genus of phycomycetous fungi. The species are partially saprophytic. 5. fe'rax is destructive to salmon and to various water animals.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Saproleg'nia [G. sapros, rotten, + legnon, an edge.] A genus of fungi, one species of which, S. ferax, causes a destructive disease in salmon.
  150. Sarcina - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sarcina (sar-si'-nah) [L., "a bundle"; pi., sarcina}. A genus of schizpmycetes consisting of cocci dividing in three directions, thus producing cubic masses. See micrococci, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Sar'cina [L. sarcina, a pack, bundle.] A genus of non-flagellated organisms of the family Coccacete, in which division occurs in three planes, the newly formed cells remaining in position, thus forming cubes. S. au'rea, a species found in the exudate in certain cases of croupous pneumonia. S. fusces'cens [L. getting dark colored], a specie, occasionally found in the stomach contents. S. no'bilia, a form producing a reddish pigment, found once in a specimen of ascitic fluid. S. ventric'uli, a species found not infrequently in the stomach. S. virchow'ii, a species found in
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sarcina (sar'sin-ah) [L. " pack "]. i. A genus of schizomycetous plants, various species of which are regarded as pathogenic: it is regarded by some as a subgenus of micrococcus. 2. Same as sarcine. S. al'ba, a species with small cocci, found in air and water. S. auranti'aca, a species from air, water, and from white beer, producing a golden-yellow pigment (linoxanthin). S. au'rea, a species from pulmonary exudates of pneumonia: it produces a bright-yellow pigment. S. can'dida, a species from water and the air of a brewery. 8. na'va, a species from beer and cheese: it produces a yellow pigment. S. fusees cens, a species from the human stomach. S. hyali'na, a species from marsh-water. S. intestina'lis, a species from the intestines of man, animals, and fowls. 8. littora'lis, a species from sea-water, producing a red pigment. Lowenberg's s., a pathogenic form from a case of ozena. S. lu'tea, a species from air, the conjunctiva! sac, human skin, potato, water, etc., producing a yellow pigment. 8. maxima, a large species from malt-mash. S. minu'ta, a very small species from sour milk. S. mor'rhuae, a species from cod-fish. S. nob'ilis, a species from old ascitic fluid, producing a brick-red pigment. S. paludo'sa, a species from marshwater. S. pulmo num. a non-pathogenic species from the sputum of phthisis. S. reitenbach'ii, a form from decaying water-plants. 8, re nis, a species from the kidneys of tuberculous cadavers. 8. ro'sea, a species from air, beer, red milk, etc.: it produces an intensely red pigment. S. uri'naa, a form from the human bladder: not pathogenic. S. ventric'uli, a species from the stomachs of men and animals, forming colonies of considerable size. S, viola cea, a species from water producing a violet pigment. S. vircho'wii, a species from the human lung: said to cause the condition known as pseudomycosis sarcinica.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Sar'cina [L. sarcina, a pack, bundle.] A genus of non-flagellated organisms of the family Coccacete, in which division occurs in three planes, the newly formed cells remaining in position, thus forming cubes. S. au'rea, a species found in the exudate in certain cases of croupous pneumonia. S. fusces'cens [L. getting dark colored], a specie, occasionally found in the stomach contents. S. no'bilia, a form producing a reddish pigment, found once in a specimen of ascitic fluid. S. ventric'uli, a species found not infrequently in the stomach. S. virchow'ii, a species found in
  151. Sarcocystis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sarcocystis (sar-ko-sis'-tis) [sarco-; xfyrtt, a cyst]. A group of the sporozoa. S. miescheri, a parasite found in pork and beef.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Sarcocystis [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, 4- kystis. bladder j A genus of protozoan parasites of the order 5arrr> sporidia; the initial stages are passed in muscuhr tissue. S. minis, a species parasitic in mice, causing the structures called Miescher's* tubes. S. tenel'la, a species in the sheep, producing cysts of large size in the muscles.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Sarcocystis [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, 4- kystis. bladder j A genus of protozoan parasites of the order 5arrr> sporidia; the initial stages are passed in muscuhr tissue. S. minis, a species parasitic in mice, causing the structures called Miescher's* tubes. S. tenel'la, a species in the sheep, producing cysts of large size in the muscles.
  152. Sarracenia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sarracenia (sar-as-e'-ne-ah) [Dr. Sarraain, of Quebec]. A genus of American insectivorous plants. e. g.t side-saddle flower, or pitcher-plant, remarkable for their trumpet shaped leaves. S. purpurea, S. Huva, and S. variolaris, are said to afford rootsserviceable in dyspepsia and gout. S. purpurea and S. violaris have been vaunted as a cure for smallpox. They are diuretic, diaphoretic, and stimulant. Dose of the fldext. gtt. xxv.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sarracenia (sar-as-e'ne-ah). A genus of polypetalous plants, known as sidesaddle-flower and pitcher-plant, . type of the order Sarraceniacese. S. purpu'rea. the commonest of the pitcherplants of North America, is vaunted as a cure for small-pox: also its homeopathic preparation. The secretion of the pitcher of this plant is said to contain digestant and anesthetic ferments. It is a stimulant diuretic and aperient. 5. fla'va, a species known as trumpetleaf and huntsman'sImrn. is an effective remedy for diarrhea. Dose of fluidextract of rhizome, 5-13 min. (0.333-1 c.c.).
  153. Scabiosa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Scabiosa (skab-e-o'sah). 1. Scabious ; genus of plants of the Dipsaceae. 2. See 51. arvensis. flores scablosae. Tie flowers of S. arvensis (of 5. succisa [Fr Cod.]). S. arvensis. Clodweed. Tie herb is in use as a domestic aperient aad alterative. S. sucelsa. The morsxs caboli, or devil's bit. The root and 'let* were formerly used in abscesses and locally in leukorrhea. The root, whicfc a bitter and mildly astringent, is diieJ? employed by the veterinarians. [Lat, scabiosus, rough.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Scabiosa (ska-be-o'sah) [L.]. A genus of dipsaceous plants called scabious: various species are popularly regarded as depuratives of the blood.
  154. Schistosoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Schistosoma (skis-to-so'-mah) A genua of trematode worms of flukes. S. h;ematobium, a blood-fluke causing Egyptian hematuria. S. japonicum.au Asiatic blood-fluke the cause of a disease endemic in certain parts of China and Japan; there are enlargement of the liver and spleen, increased appetite, diarrhea, and frequently mucous, bloody stools. Syn., Schistosoma cattoi.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Schistosoma (skis-to-so'mah). Schistosomum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Schistosoma (skis-to-so'mah). Schistosomum.
  155. Scopolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Scopolia (sko-po'le-ah) [after J. A. Scopoli]. A genus of solanaceous plants. 5. otropoi'dcs (corniolica), of Europe, and 5. japon'ica and S. lu'rida, of Asia, have properties like those of hyoscyamus and belladonna. Dose of fluidextract of the rhizome, 1-3 min. (0.06-0.2 c.c.).
  156. Scutellaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Scutellaria (sku-tel-la're-ah). i. Helmetflower, skullcap; a genus of labiate plants. 2. Of the U. S. Ph., 5". lateriflora. cxtractum scutellarlac fluidum. Fluid extract of the herb of S. lateriflora [U. S. Ph.]. S. loteriflora. Mad weed, the S. of the U. S. Ph. It is probably inert, but is still somewhat employed as a nervine. [Lat., scutella, a salver.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Scutellaria (sku-tel-a'rc-ah). A genus of labiate herbs, called skullcap. .S'. laleriflo'ra. a plant of North America, is nervine, antispasmodic, and tonic, and is used in malarial fever and epilepsy. Dose of fluidextract, 30-60 min. (2-4 c.c.); of extract, 4-15 gr. (0.26-1 gm.).
  157. Sed - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sed. Abbreviation for L. se'des, stool.
  158. Semih - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Semih. Abbreviation for L. semiho'ra, half an hour.
  159. Senecio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Senecio (se-ne'-sf-o) [sener, an old man]. Gioundscl, a genus of composite-flowered plants, said to contain 960 species, many of them medicinal. 5. aureus is the common liferoot. S. cnnicida, yerba del Puebla, a Mexican species, is diuretic fend is recommended in treatment of epilepsy. ,S. cineraria is a species of South America; the fresh juice of the leaves, stems, and flowers is recommended in treatment of capsular and lenticular cataracts and other diseases of the eye. S. gracilis is a slender species, generally regarded as a variety of S. aureus. S. jacobaa, ragwoit or ragweed, is tonic and astringent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Senecio (sen-e'she-o) (L. "old man'!. A genus of composite-flowered plants: many species are reputed to be tonic and diuretic. 5. au'reus, the common ragwort, or life-root, is a diuretic and diaphoretic, expectorant, and tonic. Dose of fluidextract, 30-60 min. (2-4 c.c.); of solid extract, 5-10 gr. (0.333-0.666 gm.).
  160. Sept - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sept. Abbreviation for L. sep'tem, seven.
  161. Serenoa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Sereno'a [after Sereno Watson, Cambridge (Mass.) botanist, igth century.] A genus of palms, the dried fruit of one species of which, S. serrulata, saw-palmetto, is the official sabal.*
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Serenoa (ser-e-no'ah) [after Sercno Watson]. A genus of palms. S. serrida'la is the saw-palmetto or sabal of the southern United States. A fluidextract of the berries is diuretic, expectorant, and aphrodisiac: used in diseases of the prostate and bladder. The medicinal virtues of the drug are said to reside in its various oils. Dose of fluidextract, 30-120 min. (2-8 c.c.); of extract, 5-10 gr. (0.333-0.666 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Sereno'a [after Sereno Watson, Cambridge (Mass.) botanist, igth century.] A genus of palms, the dried fruit of one species of which, S. serrulata, saw-palmetto, is the official sabal.*
  162. Serjania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Serjania (ser-ja'ne-ah). A genus of tropical trees, some of them poisonous. 5. letha'lis grows in Brazil; from it a native bee collects an exceed ingly poisonous honey.
  163. Sig - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sig. n. pro. Abbreviation for L. sig'na nom'inc pro'prio, label with the proper name.
  164. Solidago - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Solidago (sol-id-a'-go) [solidus, solid: gen., solidaginis]. Golden-rod, a genus of some 100 species of composite flowered plants, mostly American. S. odora, is carminative, diaphoretic, stimulant, diuretic, and antemetic. S. rigida, is tonic and astringent. S. virgaurea, of both continents, is astringent, tonic, and vulnerary.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Solida'go [L.] A genus of plants of the order Composite, the goldenrods. S. odo'ra, sweet or fragrant goldenrod, and S. virgau'rea, Aaron's rod, wound-wort, have carminative and astringent properties.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Solida'go [L.] A genus of plants of the order Composite, the goldenrods. S. odo'ra, sweet or fragrant goldenrod, and S. virgau'rea, Aaron's rod, wound-wort, have carminative and astringent properties.
  165. Sophora - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sophora (so-fo'-rak) [Arab.]. A genus of leguminous trees, shrubs, and herbs, mostly growing in warm regions. S. sericea (see loco) is a poisonous plant of the U. S.; its seeds contain sophorine. S. speciesa, a tree of Texas, also yields sophorine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Sopho'ra [Ar. sof&ra.] A genus of plants of the order Leguminosa, or bean-family. S. secundiflo'ra, coral-bean, a Texas species containing sophorine. S. tomento'sa, a tropical species, the bean of which has been used in cholera.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Sophora (sof-o'rah). A genus of leguminous plants. S. sericea, A species found in Colorado and Mexico, regarded as one of the loco plants. Its seeds contain, according to Parsons, a liquid alkaloid, probably identical with cytisin. S. speclosa. A shrub of Texas and New Mexico. The poisonous seeds contain cytisin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Sopho'ra [Ar. sof&ra.] A genus of plants of the order Leguminosa, or bean-family. S. secundiflo'ra, coral-bean, a Texas species containing sophorine. S. tomento'sa, a tropical species, the bean of which has been used in cholera.
  166. Spigelia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Spigelia (spi-je'-le-ah) [after Adrian van der Spiegel; see Spigelius]. Pinkroot, a genus of plants of the order Loganiacete. The rhizome and rootlets of S. marilandica constitute the spigelia of the U. S. P.; they contain a volatile alkaloid, spigeline, and are used as an anthelmintic against the roundworm. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.65-1.3 Gm.) for a child; 1-2 dr. (4-8 Gm.) for an adult, s., fluideztract of (fluidextractum spigelia, U. S. P.). Dose 10-20 min. (0.651.3 Cc.) for a child; 1-2 dr. (4-8 Cc.) for an adult.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Spigelia (spi-je'le-ah) [after A. van der Spiegel. 1558-1635). A genus of loganiaceous plants. The rhizome and roots of S. marilan'iliea, pinkroot, are an efficient vermifuge: used especially for round-worms. Dose of fluidextract, 15-69 iniii. (1-4 c.c.); of fluidextract of spigclia and senna, 1-2 fl.dr. (i-S c.c.).
  167. Stage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Stage (staj). i. A period or distinct phase in the course of a disease; a stadium. 2. The plate or platform of a microscope, algid 8., a condition characterized by a flickering pulse, subnormal temperature, and varied nervous symptoms. amphibolic •., the stage which intervenes between the acme and the decline of an attack, asphyxial B., the preliminary stage of an attack of epidemic cholera: marked by cramps, severe pain, and great thirst, cold s., the chill or rigor of a malarial attack, def ervescent 1., the stage of falling temperature, eruptive B. Same as stadium fluortscenlia. expulsive B.. the stage of labor during which the child is being expelled from the uterus. 8. of fervescence, pyrogenetic stage. first B., the time during which the fetal head is being molded and the cervix dilated, hot 8., the period of pyrexia in a malarial paroxysm, incubative B., the early stage of an infectious disease, marked by the formation of
  168. Static - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Static (stat'ik) [L. slal'icus; Gr. trrarutfc]. i. At rest; in equilibrium; not in motion. 2. Not dynamic.
  169. Statice - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Statice (stat'-is-e) forarun}, an astringent herb]. A genus of plants of the order Plumbaginea. S. antarctica and 5. brasiliensis, baycuru or guaycura. South American species, are used to produce uterine contractions. S. gmelini, a species indigenous to southern Russia, is used as a gargle and in diarrhea. 5. limonium grows upon the coasts of Europe and North America; the plant, seed, and root are used as astringents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Statice (stat'is-e) [Gr. Otoltuoi astringent]. A genus of plumbagineous plants. 5. limo'nium, marshrosemary, and other species are highly astringent.
  170. Stellaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Stellaria (stel-a're-ah). A genus of caryophyllaceous plants: the chickweeds. S. Mas'tea and 5. mr'dia were formerly used as demulcent medicines.
  171. Sterculia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sterculia (sler-ku'-le-ah) [stercus, dungj. A genus of some 85 species of tropical trees. S. urens of India, and S. tragacantna of Africa afford some part of the gums known as tragacanth. S. acummau produces the kola-nui; see kola.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Sterculia (ster-ku'le-ah) (L. Stercu'lius the god of dung], A genus of trees and shrubs, including many species, mostly tropical: some have edible seeds and others are medicinal, while still others afford a gum resembling tragacanth.
  172. Still - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Still (sti'li). Plural of stilus. See stylus.
  173. Stillingia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Stillingia (stil-in'je-ah) [after B. SliUingfteet]. A genus of euphorbiacepus trees, shrubs, and herbs. The root of 5. sylvafica, a plant of North America, is sialogogue and diuretic, and is used in syphilis, tuberculosis, and skin diseases. Dose of tincture or fluidextract, 10-60 min. (0.666-4 c.c.).
  174. Stipa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Stipa (sli'-pah) lraseyi, sleepy grass, is a species found in New Mexico in the Sacramento Mountains, the ingestion of which, causes in horses a stupor which endures for several days.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Sti'pa [L. tow.] A genus of grasses some specie! of which are ornamental, others used for forage. S. ine'brions, a species which is said to produce stupor in animals grazing on it. S. sibe'rica, that Siberian species having an action similar to a of S. intbricu: S. vas'eyi, S. virid'uU, sleep? grass, a species growing in the southwestern United States, which is said to be narcotic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Sti'pa [L. tow.] A genus of grasses some specie! of which are ornamental, others used for forage. S. ine'brions, a species which is said to produce stupor in animals grazing on it. S. sibe'rica, that Siberian species having an action similar to a of S. intbricu: S. vas'eyi, S. virid'uU, sleep? grass, a species growing in the southwestern United States, which is said to be narcotic.
  175. Streptothrix - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Strep'tothrix [G. strsptos, bent, + thrix, hair.] A genus of Chlamydobacteriacewhich includes the forms of unbranched threads in which division occurs in only one plane. S. actinomy'ces, Actinomyces bovis. S. farcin'ica, a species found in farcy, believed to be pathogenic. S. leproid'es, a microorganism obtained- in cultures made from leprous nodules; the source of nastin.* S. madu'ree, a species found in the lesions of fungous foot of India, probably not pathogenic. S. mu'ris ratt'i, an organism believed by Schlottmueller to be pathogenic of rat-bite fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Streptothrix (strep'to-thriks) [Gr. oTpeirrAf twisted + 9pJ{ hair]. A genus of schizomycetes in the form of slim, elongated filaments inclosed in a sheath. S. actinom'yces. Same as, Actinom'yces bo'vis. S. alba, a form said to cause actinomycosis. S. bronchiti'dis, a species producing gangrenous bronchitis. It resembles Aclinom'yces bo'vis, excepting that the ends of the rays are not knobbed. 8. cap'rae, a pathogenic species causing a sort of tuberculosis in horses, and abscesses when injected into guinea-pigs and rabbits. 8. cunic'uli, a species from the intestine of the pig, producing local necrosis. 8. eppinge ri, a pathogenic species from a brain-abscess. S. farcin'ica, a pathogenic species from cattlefarcy: non-motile, and made up of branching threads in lens-shaped colonies. S. fbrste'ri, occurs in concretions found in the lacrimal ducts. 8. fre'eri, a species isolated from cases of mycetoma in the Philippines. S. hoffiuanni, a species that occurs in the air, causing abscesses in guinea-pigs and rabbits. • S. isra'eli, a species found in actinomycosis of man. It resembles Aclinom'yces bo'vis. 8. leproi'des, a species found in leprous nodules. S. mad'une, an organism from madura-foot, or the fungus-foot of India, by some identified with Aclinom'yces bo'vis, but probably distinct from it. 8. znu'ris rat ti, a species found in certain cases of rat-bite fever. 8. pro tens, a pathogenic species causing a sort of actinomycosis in man. and septicemia and pseudotuberculosis when injected into mice. S. pseudotuberculo'sa, a pathogenic species from a consolidated and caseous lung.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Strep'tothrix [G. strsptos, bent, + thrix, hair.] A genus of Chlamydobacteriacewhich includes the forms of unbranched threads in which division occurs in only one plane. S. actinomy'ces, Actinomyces bovis. S. farcin'ica, a species found in farcy, believed to be pathogenic. S. leproid'es, a microorganism obtained- in cultures made from leprous nodules; the source of nastin.* S. madu'ree, a species found in the lesions of fungous foot of India, probably not pathogenic. S. mu'ris ratt'i, an organism believed by Schlottmueller to be pathogenic of rat-bite fever.
  176. Strophanthus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Strophanthus (strof-anf-thus) [bvQot, flower], A genus of plants of the order Apocynacea, some of the species of which are used for the preparation of arrow-poison* in Africa. The strophanthus of the U. S. P. is the ripe seed of S. kombe; it contains a crystalline glucoside, strophanthin, and an alkaloid, ineine. Strophanthus is a muscle-poison, but in small doses is a cardiac and perhaps a vascular stimulant. It is used in the same cases as digitalis, s., tincture of (tinctura strophanthi, U. S. P., B. P. Dose 5-15 min. (0.32-1.0 Cc.).
  177. Sylvian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Sylvian (sil'-ve-an). Described by the anatomist Jacobus Sylvius (1478-1555). or Franciscus Sylvius (1614-1672). S. angle, the angle formed by the posterior limb of the Sylvian fissure with a line perpendicular to the superior border of the hemisphere. S. aqueduct, a narrow canal extending from the third to the fourth ventricle. S. artery, the middle cerebral artery, lying in the fissure of Sylvius. S. fissure, a deep fissure of the brain beginning on the outer side of the anterior perforated space, and extending outward to the lateral surface of the hemisphere. It has two branches—a short vertical and a long horizontal, the latter separating the parietal from the temporosphenoid lobe. Between the branches lies the island of Reil. S. fossa, S. valley, the depression which appears on the surface of the brain about the end of the second month of fetal life and afterward becomes the Sylvian fissure. S. vein, one of the veins of the convexity of the brain, which courses at first along the fissure of Sylvius and then ascends across the hemisphere. S. ventricle, the fifth ventricle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Syl'vian. Relating to Franciscus or Jacobus Sylvius* or to any of the structures described by either of them. S. an'gle, the angle formed by the S. line and a line perpendicular to the horizontal plane tangential to the highest point of the hemisphere. S. aq'ueduct, aquxductus cerebri.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Syl'vian. Relating to Franciscus or Jacobus Sylvius* or to any of the structures described by either of them. S. an'gle, the angle formed by the S. line and a line perpendicular to the horizontal plane tangential to the highest point of the hemisphere. S. aq'ueduct, aquxductus cerebri.
  178. Syr - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Syr. An abbreviation for syrupus.
  179. T-bandage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      T-bandage. See under bandage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      T-bandage. A strip of roller bandage with another strip attached to its center at right angles; employed as a retentive bandage for dressmgi
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      T-bandage. A strip of roller bandage with another strip attached to its center at right angles; employed as a retentive bandage for dressmgi
  180. Tabanus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Tabanus (tab-an'-us) [see tabanid]. A genus of horse-flies or gad-fliea. More than 1300 species are known, the females of many of them being capable of inflicting a severe and painful.bite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Taba'nus [L. a gadfly.] A genus of biting flies, gadflies, horse-flies, breeze-flies; several of the species are believed to transmit trypanosomes.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Tabanus (tab'an-us). A genus of bloodsucking flies of the Diflera and the family Tabmiidac. T. bovinus. A species sucking the blood from cattle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tabanus (tab-a'nus) [L. "gadfly"]. A genus of biting flies. T. fu'nifer and other species are said to transmit trypanosomes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Taba'nus [L. a gadfly.] A genus of biting flies, gadflies, horse-flies, breeze-flies; several of the species are believed to transmit trypanosomes.
  181. Teucrium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Teucrium (tu-kre-um) fr«r*/nr.i-. germander]. A genus of labiate plants, germander or spleenwort. T. chamaedrys, is used as an alterative. T. mantimum, cat-thyme, has errhine and antispasmodic properties, and was formerly used in coughs and nervous affections.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Teu'crium [G. teukrion, germander.] A genus of plants of the order Labiata, the germanders, several species of which have been more or less employed in medicine. T. canaden'sis, American germander, wood-sage, has been employed in various functional nervous affections in doses of gr. 10—30 (0.6—2.0).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Teucrium (tulcre-um) [Gr. rtteptov]. A genus of labiate plants called germander. Several oldworld species are medicinal, especially those mentioned under teucrin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Teu'crium [G. teukrion, germander.] A genus of plants of the order Labiata, the germanders, several species of which have been more or less employed in medicine. T. canaden'sis, American germander, wood-sage, has been employed in various functional nervous affections in doses of gr. 10—30 (0.6—2.0).
  182. Thapsia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Thapsia (thap'se-ah) [L.; Gr. 6a\(iia; named from the isle of Thapsus]. A genus of umbelliferous plants. T. gargan'ica, of northern Africa, affords an irritant resin somewhat used in plasters; the plant is locally employed as a polychrest remedy.
  183. Thiothrix - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Thiothrix (Ihi'-o-thriks') [Mor, sulphur; «p((, hair]. A genus of the family Beggiatoacea; filaments nonmotile; surrounded by a delicate sheath; sulphur granules in cell contents; at ends of filaments rodshaped gonidia; filaments unequal in diameter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Thi'othrix [G. theion, sulphur, + thrix, hair] A genus of Chlamydobacteriacete, which includes those in which the cells contain sulphur granules.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Thi'othrix [G. theion, sulphur, + thrix, hair] A genus of Chlamydobacteriacete, which includes those in which the cells contain sulphur granules.
  184. Tn - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Tn. Abbreviation for normal intraocular tension.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tn. Symbol for normal intra-ocular tension.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Tn. Abbreviation for normal intraocular tension.
  185. Tola - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tola (vo'Iah) [L.]. The sole or palm. v. ma'nus, the palm of the hand. T. pe'dis, the sole of the foot.
  186. Tragia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Tra'gia [after the Latinized name of Hieronymus Bock [L. Tragus], German botanist, 1498-1554.] A genus of tropical and subtropical plants of the order Euphorbiacea; some of the species have been employed in domestic medicine as diaphoretics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tragia (tra'je-ah). A genus of poisonous euphorbiaceous plants: several species (7". u'rens, etc.) are weeds of the southern United States.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Tra'gia [after the Latinized name of Hieronymus Bock [L. Tragus], German botanist, 1498-1554.] A genus of tropical and subtropical plants of the order Euphorbiacea; some of the species have been employed in domestic medicine as diaphoretics.
  187. Trichomonas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Trichomonas (trik-om'-o-nas) [tricho-; ttovta, a monad t. A genus of infusorians. T. intestinalis, is found in the feces in sonie cases of diarrhea, enteritis, and typhoid. T. vaginalis, a species occasionally found in the vagina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Trichomonas (tri-kom'o-nas) [G. thrix(lrich-), hair, + monas, single.] A genus of flagellate protozoa. T. hom'inis, a species found in the human intestine, sometimes apparently the cause of diarrhea T. intestina'lis, a species sometimes found in the intestine in bacillary dysentery. T. vagina'lis, a species found in the vaginal secretions and sometimes in the male urethra.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Trichomonas (trik-om'on-as). A genus of protozoa of the phylum Mastigophora and class Eufiagellata. The bodies are pyriform and flagellate at one end. T. hominis. A pear-shaped organism, found in the normal mouth and intestine and in cases of diarrhea in Europe and India. T. intcstinalis. See T. hominis. T. ptilmonalls. A form found in the sputum of lungs in phthisis. T. vaginalis. A species of fusiform shape found in the vagina, especially in cases of vaginitis. [Gr., thrix, a hair, + monas, a unit.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Trichomonas (tri-kom'o-nas) [G. thrix(lrich-), hair, + monas, single.] A genus of flagellate protozoa. T. hom'inis, a species found in the human intestine, sometimes apparently the cause of diarrhea T. intestina'lis, a species sometimes found in the intestine in bacillary dysentery. T. vagina'lis, a species found in the vaginal secretions and sometimes in the male urethra.
  188. Trichomycetes - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Trichomycetes (tri-ko-mi-se'tgz) [G. thrix(trich-), hair, + mykes, fungus.] Hair-fungus; a family of Hyphomycetes including the higher bacteria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Trichomycetes (tri-ko-mi-se'tgz) [G. thrix(trich-), hair, + mykes, fungus.] Hair-fungus; a family of Hyphomycetes including the higher bacteria.
  189. Trichophyton - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Trichoph'yton [G. lhrix(trich-), hair, + phyton, plant.] A genus of fungi pathogenic of tinea or ringworm. T. ec'tothrix [G. ektos, without], and T. en'dothrix [G. endon, within], see T. megalosporon. T. megalos'poron [G. megas(megal-), large, + sporos, seed], the large spored ringworm fungus, common in France, but rare in England and the United States; it occurs in two forms: T. m. ectothrix, the spores of which are found usually outside the cuticle of the hair; and T. m. tndoihrix, which invades the substance of the hair; the first is the form occurring in ringworm in domestic animals. T. micros'poron [G. mikros, small, + sporos, seed], Microsporon audouini, the species of fungus usually productive of ringworm in the United States. T. ra"dens, a species which has been mentioned as the cause of alopecia areata. T. ro'dens, Achorion quinckcanum. T. rosa'ceum, a species occasionally found in cases of typical ringworm; it produces cultures of a pink color. T. ton'surans, a variety of the ringworm fungus, said to be a distinct species, causing tinea tonsurans.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Trichophyton (tri-kof'it-on). A genus of fungi of the order Ascomycctes. The mycelial spores are large and the conkiu round. The various species cause diseases of the hair and skin. T. acuminatum. See T. Sabourandi. T. alblscleans. Found in tinea albigena. T. ccylonense. Present in tinea negr circinata. T. Mansonii. The cause of tinea imbricata. T. mentagropliytc-. A species that produces a pyogenic sycosis in man. T. Sabourandi. A spec :es that produces tinea capitis. T. tonsurans, A species producing the "black dotted ringworm," either as tinea capita or tinea corporis. [Gr., thrix, a hair. + phyton. a plant.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Trichoph'yton [G. lhrix(trich-), hair, + phyton, plant.] A genus of fungi pathogenic of tinea or ringworm. T. ec'tothrix [G. ektos, without], and T. en'dothrix [G. endon, within], see T. megalosporon. T. megalos'poron [G. megas(megal-), large, + sporos, seed], the large spored ringworm fungus, common in France, but rare in England and the United States; it occurs in two forms: T. m. ectothrix, the spores of which are found usually outside the cuticle of the hair; and T. m. tndoihrix, which invades the substance of the hair; the first is the form occurring in ringworm in domestic animals. T. micros'poron [G. mikros, small, + sporos, seed], Microsporon audouini, the species of fungus usually productive of ringworm in the United States. T. ra"dens, a species which has been mentioned as the cause of alopecia areata. T. ro'dens, Achorion quinckcanum. T. rosa'ceum, a species occasionally found in cases of typical ringworm; it produces cultures of a pink color. T. ton'surans, a variety of the ringworm fungus, said to be a distinct species, causing tinea tonsurans.
  190. Trid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Trid. Abbreviation for L. trid'uum, three days.
  191. Trypanosoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Trypanosoma (tri-pan-o-so'-mah) (rpbwMor, a borer; crwjia, body]. A genus of protozoan parasitic organisms. T. brucei, the organism causing the tsetse fly disease of horses. T. castellanfi, probably the same as T. gambiense. T. equiperdum, the exciting cause of dourine, q. v. T equinum, the exciting cause of mal de Caderas in the horse. T. eransi, the organism found in surra. T. gambiense, the organism causing sleepinR-sickness. T. lewisi, one found in rats. T. the Her i, one found in galziekte, a disease of cattle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Trypanosoma (tri-pan-o-so'mah) [G. Irypanon, an auger, + sOtna, body.] A genus of flagellate Protozoa, the members of which have a spindleshaped body with an undulating membrane on one side and a single flagellum. The trypanosomes are parasitic in the blood plasma of a vertebrate (only a few being pathogenic) and as a rule have an intermediate host, an invertebrate animal, in which the sexual cycle occurs. The pathogenic forms cause sleepingsickness in man and a number of diseases in animals. T. bru'cei, the parasite of nagana or tsetse fly disease. T. dimor'phon, the pathogenic parasite of Gambian horse disease. T. equi'num, the parasite of mal de caderas. T. equiper'dum, the parasite of dourine. T. ev'ansi, the parasite of surra. T. gambien'se, the parasite of sleeping-sickness. T. hipp'icum, the parasite of murrina. T. inopina'tum, a species found in the blood of a frog. T. lew'isi, a non-pathogenic parasite in the blood of rats. T. luis, the supposed female sexual form of Treponema pallidum. T. noc'tuae, a species found in the blood of the owl, the intermediate host being Culex pipiens. T. san'guinis, the earliest discovered species, having been found in the blood of the frog in 1843. T. thei'leri, causes galziekte (gall-sickness) in cattle. T. uganden'se, T. gambiense. T. vitta'tse, a species in the blood of the tortoise.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Trypanosoma (tri-pan-o-so'mah). A genus of protozoa, of the phylum Mastigophora and the family Trypanosomidae, with a flagellum and an undulating membrane. They increase by longitudinal division and in some species several forms have been observed, which infest both vertebrates and invertebrates. A few species have been artificially cultivated. For species of Trypanosoma, see table. T. lirucei. A parasite widespread in Africa, causing nagana in horses and other equines. The intermediary host transmitting the disease is the tsetse fly or Gtossina morsitans. T. cruzi. A species found in human blood in Brazil. T. dlmorphon. See table. T. equlnum. A species found in South America in the mal de caderas, a fatal febrile disease of horses. T. equipcrdum. A species causing dourine, or mal du coit, a sexual disease, resembling syphilis, in horses. T. Evansi. A form which produces a disease in India called surra and affecting horses, mules, camels, and cattle with fever, paralysis and death. T. gambiense. A species occurring in the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood of human beings, suffering with the sleeping sickness. The disease is transmitted to the tsetse fly, called Glossina palpis. T. hominls. See T. gambiense. T. Liewisi. The t. of the rat. the disease being transmitted by lice and fleas. This parasite has been cultivated on rabbit blood agar. T. Thelleri.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Trypanosoma (tri"pan-o-so'mah) [Gr. rpfaravor borer + aufta body]. A genus of sporozoan parasites found in the blood of man and animals, characterized by the delicate, undulatory membrane attached to the body and whip-like flagellum. T. america'num, a species infecting cattle in the United States. T. bru'cei, occurs in the disease nagana or tsetse-fly disease of horses and cattle of central Africa. T. calmet'ii, a species found in the blood of a domestic fowl in Tonkin. T. cazaltmi, a species said to cause the disease souma of cattle, sheep, and horses. T. congolen'se, a species causing a disease that resembles nagana in southern Africa. T. cru'si, a species said to be the cause of Chagas' disease. T.dimor'phon, a species occurring in Gambian horse disease. T. equi'num, the species found in horses suffering from mal de caderas, a disease of central South America. T. equiper'dum, T. rouge ti. found in the disease of horses in Algeria called dourine. T. evan'si, found in the disease surra of mules and horses in India. T. gambien se, found in the cerebrospinal fluid and the blood of man in cases of tropical splenomegaly, sleepingsickness, and various cachexial fevers of warm countries. See Congo trypanosomiasis, under trypanosomiasis. T. hip picum, a species believed to cause the disease murrain. T. lew'isi, a species found in the blood of the rat. T. lu'is, a protozoan resembling Spirocha'ta pal'lida, found in syphilitic lesions. T. noc'tuse, a species found in the blood of the little owl, being disseminated by the gnat, Cu'lex pip1 tens. T. pecau'di, a species said to cause the disease oaleri. See baleri. T rhodesien'se, a species found in the antelope in Nyassaland in South Africa. It may be transmitted to man by the bite of Glos'sina mar'titans. See Kaodzera. T. san'guinis, a species discovered by David Griiby in 1843. T. thei leri. * species found in cattle affected with the disease galziekte.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Trypanosoma (tri-pan-o-so'mah) [G. Irypanon, an auger, + sOtna, body.] A genus of flagellate Protozoa, the members of which have a spindleshaped body with an undulating membrane on one side and a single flagellum. The trypanosomes are parasitic in the blood plasma of a vertebrate (only a few being pathogenic) and as a rule have an intermediate host, an invertebrate animal, in which the sexual cycle occurs. The pathogenic forms cause sleepingsickness in man and a number of diseases in animals. T. bru'cei, the parasite of nagana or tsetse fly disease. T. dimor'phon, the pathogenic parasite of Gambian horse disease. T. equi'num, the parasite of mal de caderas. T. equiper'dum, the parasite of dourine. T. ev'ansi, the parasite of surra. T. gambien'se, the parasite of sleeping-sickness. T. hipp'icum, the parasite of murrina. T. inopina'tum, a species found in the blood of a frog. T. lew'isi, a non-pathogenic parasite in the blood of rats. T. luis, the supposed female sexual form of Treponema pallidum. T. noc'tuae, a species found in the blood of the owl, the intermediate host being Culex pipiens. T. san'guinis, the earliest discovered species, having been found in the blood of the frog in 1843. T. thei'leri, causes galziekte (gall-sickness) in cattle. T. uganden'se, T. gambiense. T. vitta'tse, a species in the blood of the tortoise.
  192. Tunicata - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Tunica'ta. A class of animals just below the Vertebrate, having the rudiments of a spinal column; the sea-squirts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tunicata (tu-nik-a'tah). A class of small animals with a sac-like body and a leathery tunic. They are intermediate between the invertebrates and true vertebrates.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Tunica'ta. A class of animals just below the Vertebrate, having the rudiments of a spinal column; the sea-squirts.
  193. Tus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Tus., tus. Abbreviation for L. lus'sis, a cough.
  194. Ungulata - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Ungula'ta [L. ungula, hoof.] A class or division of the Mammalia, containing the animals with hoofs as distinguished from the Unguiculata.*
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ungulata (un-gu-la'tah). A class of animals, including those that have hoofs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Ungula'ta [L. ungula, hoof.] A class or division of the Mammalia, containing the animals with hoofs as distinguished from the Unguiculata.*
  195. Urginea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Urginea (ur-jin'-e-ah) [urgere, to press). A genuscilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Urginea (ur-jin'e-ah) I..]. A genus of liliaceous plants. U. marit'ima affords squills. See 6'riUa.
  196. Usnea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Usnea (us'-ne-ah). A genus of lichen or tree moss.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Us'nea [A.S. achneh, lichen.] A genus of lichens, tree-mosses. U. angula'ta, a species employed like U. plicata. U. barba'ta, beard moss, hanging moss. U. plica'ta, a species employed like U. angulata as a substitute for litmus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Us'nea [A.S. achneh, lichen.] A genus of lichens, tree-mosses. U. angula'ta, a species employed like U. plicata. U. barba'ta, beard moss, hanging moss. U. plica'ta, a species employed like U. angulata as a substitute for litmus.
  197. Vandellia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Vandel'lia [Vandelli, Italian botanist, i8th century ] A genus of plants of the order Scrofulariacttf, the figwort family. V. diffu'sa is a South American herb, with an odor of tobacco, employed as a cholagogue cathartic and in the treatment of malaria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Vandellia (van-del'e-ah) [after one Vandelli}. A. genus of scrophularinaceous herbs. V. difu'sa, a South American plant, is purgative, emetic, cholagogue, and antipyretic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Vandel'lia [Vandelli, Italian botanist, i8th century ] A genus of plants of the order Scrofulariacttf, the figwort family. V. diffu'sa is a South American herb, with an odor of tobacco, employed as a cholagogue cathartic and in the treatment of malaria.
  198. Verbascum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Verbascum (vcr-bas'-kum) [I,.]. Mullein, a genus of'plants of the order Scrophularinea. The leaves and flowers of I', thapsus have been used as demulcent in catarrhal inflammation of mucous membranes and as an application to hemorrhoids.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Verbas'cum. Mullein: a genus of scror-1"-' lariaceous plants. V. thapsns. Corempn mullein. The flowers are used ii mild catarrhs, etc., and externally is itching skin diseases. The leaves -"" mildly astringent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Verbascum (vcr-bas'kum) [L.]. A genus of scrophulariaceous plants; mullein. V. Ihap'sus, common mullein, is demulcent, emollient, and stimulant. Dose of fluidextract, 10-20 min. (0.666-1.33 C.C.).
  199. Verbena - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      Verbena (ver-be'-nah) [L.]. A genus of flowering plants of some 80 species once highly esteemed In medicine, but now little used.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      Verbena (ver-be'nah). i. A germs o? gamopetalous, dicotyledonous herbs a^i shrubs. 2. The rhizome and roots of •' hastata, blue vervain. [From Lat.. Tv bena or verbenae, foliage, used in religions ceremonies.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Verbena (ver-be'nah). A genus of gamopctalous herbs and shrubs. V. hasta'ta, blue vervain, is used in the treatment of epilepsy. Dose of fluidextract, 5-3° min. (0.333-2 c.c.).
  200. Ves - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Ves. Abbreviation for L. vcs'ica, the bladder.
  201. Viscum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Viscum (vi.'kom) [L.]. A genus of plants. See mistletoe. V. al'bum, a homeopathic preparation of a European mistletoe.
  202. Vogt - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Vogt (f5gt), Paul Frederick Emmanuel Vogl, surgeon in Greifswald, 1847-1885.
  203. Vs - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      Vs. B. Abbreviation for L. venasec'tio bra'ckii, bleeding in the arm.
  204. Xanthium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      Xanthium (zan'thl-um). A genus of plants of the order Composites, several species of which have been used in medicine. X. canaden'se, cocklebur, clotbar, has been used in the treatment of skin diseases. X. spino'sum, spicy clotbur, the leaves have been used as a diaphoretic diuretic, and antiperiodic in doses of gr. 8—15 (0.5—1.0). X. struma'rium, a species credited with antidotal power to the venom of poisonous insects, and has also been employed as a styptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      Xanthium (zan'thl-um). A genus of plants of the order Composites, several species of which have been used in medicine. X. canaden'se, cocklebur, clotbar, has been used in the treatment of skin diseases. X. spino'sum, spicy clotbur, the leaves have been used as a diaphoretic diuretic, and antiperiodic in doses of gr. 8—15 (0.5—1.0). X. struma'rium, a species credited with antidotal power to the venom of poisonous insects, and has also been employed as a styptic.