a picture paints a thousand words

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Reportedly first used by Frederick R. Barnard in Printer's Ink (December, 1921), while commenting that graphics can tell a story as effectively as a large amount of descriptive text.[1]

Proverb[edit]

a picture paints a thousand words

  1. Alternative form of a picture is worth a thousand words
    • 1971, David Gates (of Bread), If, from Manna album:
      If a picture paints a thousand words
      Then why can't I paint you;
      The words will never show
      The you I've come to know.
    • 1989, Alan Kay, quoted in Kʻo-tung Huang, Timothy D. Huang, Introduction to Chinese, Japanese and Korean Computing, World Scientific, ISBN 9971506645, p. 9:
      Most human beings, no matter how familiar they are with abstract symbols, respond to voice and images better than written language. In other words, A picture paints a thousand words.
    • 2006, Paul Shakespeare, Building a Dune Buggy: The Essential Manual[1], ISBN 1904788734, page 52:
      See accompanying diagram: a picture paints a thousand words, and all that!

Translations[edit]

References[edit]