adarc

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Old Irish[edit]

adarc

Etymology[edit]

Unknown; perhaps a loanword from a pre-Celtic source cognate with Basque adar.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

adarc f ‎(genitive adarcae)

  1. horn (growth on an animal's head)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 2b16:
      tob di humu fo chosmailius n-adarcae side
      a trumpet of bronze in the shape of a horn
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 63b17:
      nanní fris·oirc doib fa·scannat hua n-adarcaib
      whatever offends them, they toss it with their horns
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 116c8:
      orgain humaidi fo chosmailius n-adarcae
      bronze instruments in the shape of a horn

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
adarc unchanged n-adarc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. L. Trask, The History of Basque
  2. ^ Mother Tongue: Journal of the Association for the Study of Language in Prehistory, issue 5 (1999): [Compare] Basque adar 'horn' - Old Irish adarc 'hom': since the latter has no Indo- European etymology, it is probably borrowed from Vasconic *adar-ko 'little horn'.
  • 1 adarc, aiderc” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.