anthological

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

anthology +‎ -ical

Adjective[edit]

anthological (not generally comparable, comparative more anthological, superlative most anthological)

  1. Of or pertaining to anthology; consisting of extracts from different authors.
    • 1691, Anthony Wood, Robert Stafford, entry in Athenae Oxonienses: An Exact Hiſtory of All the Writers and Biſhops Who have had their Education in the Univerſity of Oxford 1500—1690, Volume 1, page 485/486,
      He publiſhed,
      A Geographical and Anthological deſcription of all the Empires and Kingdoms, both of Continent and Iſlands in this Terreſtial[sic] Globe, &c. Lond. 1618.
    • 1945, Seán O'Faoláin, Peadar O'Donnell (editors), The Bell, Volume 11, page 1099,
      Its comments on some of the more anthological extracts from the Majority Report of the Banking Commission are particularly salutary.
    • 2001, Philip S. Alexander, 10: Torah and Salvation in Tannaitic Literature, D. A. Carson, Peter Thomas O'Brien, Mark A. Seifrid (editors), Justification and Variegated Nomism, Volume I: The Complexities of Second Temple Judaism, page 288,
      The other Tannaitic Midrashim, the Mekhilta de Rabbi Ishmael, Sipra and Sipre Numbers, are much more anthological in character, less tightly argued.
    • 2007, Ruth Langer, Biblical Texts in Jewish Prayers: Their History and Function, Albert Gerhards, Clemens Leonhard (edited), Jewish and Christian Liturgy and Worship: New Insights Into Its History and Interaction, page 77,
      Clues to this arise from discerning the compositional logic of the interlinked meanings of the cento, sometimes as elaborated upon in the more anthological Áorilegium structure.

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