beglamour

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

be- +‎ glamour

Verb[edit]

beglamour (third-person singular simple present beglamours, present participle beglamouring, simple past and past participle beglamoured)

  1. To make glamorous.
    • 1937, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, University of Illinois Press, 1978, Chapter 2, p. 25,[1]
      In her former blindness she had known him as shiftless Johnny Taylor, tall and lean. That was before the golden dust of pollen had beglamored his rags and her eyes.
    • 1954, Philip Wylie, The Best of Crunch and Des, page 4:
      Lights glitter on wet planks, on the functional bodies of the day's catch, and floodlights beglamour the colored dresses and the pastel beach costumes of the crowds that stroll there.
  2. To bedazzle; to deceive as if by magic.
    • 1823, John Galt, Ringan Gilhaize, Chapter 49,[2]
      “Do,” cried Robin; “sir, she’s an auld withered hag, would spean a foal. Surely she did na sae beglamour your senses as to appear like a winsome young lass?”
    • 1905, George Bernard Shaw, The Irrational Knot, London: Archibald Constable & Co, Book Two, Chapter 11, p. 227,[3]
      It is not necessary to follow the wild goose chase which the Rev. George’s imagination ran from this starting-point to the moment when he was suddenly awakened, by an unmistakable symptom, to the fact that he was being outwitted and beglamoured, like the utter novice he was, by a power which he believed to be the devil.
    • 1966, Cynthia Ozick, Trust, Part Three, Chapter 12, p. 370,
      Imagination entered her second-hand from Nick, who himself had it third-hand, because Romance meanders from peddler to peddler, holding itself out for what it is not and defrauding the be-glamoured and credulous world.
    • 1972, Martha Rofheart, Cry ‘God for Harry’ (published in the U.S. as Fortune Made His Sword), London: Book Club Associates, 1972, Book 2, Chapter 7, p. 156,[4]
      It was easy to see how he had beglamored the youth of a nation.

Derived terms[edit]