bráthair

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See also: brathair and bràthair

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bráthair (brother), from Proto-Celtic *brātīr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Noun[edit]

bráthair m (genitive singular bráthar, nominative plural bráithre)

  1. (religion) brother (male fellow member of a religious community)
    1. friar
    2. kinsman (member of society)
  2. monkfish, angelfish

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bráthair bhráthair mbráthair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *brātīr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰréh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bráthair m (genitive bráthar, nominative plural bráithir)

  1. brother, cousin, kinsman
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d8
      Do·beir-som ainm bráthre doib, arná·epret is ara miscuis in cúrsachad, act is ara seircc.
      He calls them brothers, lest they should say the reprimand is because of hatred for them, but it is because of love for them.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10c21
      Ba torad sa⟨í⟩thir dúun in chrud so ce du·melmis cech túari et ce du·gnemmis a ndu·gníat ar céli, act ní bad nertad na mbráithre et frescsiu fochricce as móo.
      It would be a fruit of labor for us in this way if we consumed every food and if we did what our fellows do, but it would not be a strengthening of the brothers and a hope of a greater reward.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 34a4
      ɔrabad cech bráthair post alium .i. is huisse ce ru·samaltar fri Críst
      so that each brother should be after the other, i.e. it is right that he be compared to Christ

Inflection[edit]

Masculine r-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative bráthair bráthairL bráithir
Vocative bráthair bráthairL bráithrea
Accusative bráthairN bráthairL bráithrea
Genitive bráthar bráthar brátharN, brá(i)threN
Dative bráthairL bráithrib bráithrib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: bráthair
  • Manx: braar
  • Scottish Gaelic: bràthair
  • Middle Irish: bráithremail

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bráthair bráthair
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbráthair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]