finocchia

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

finocchia

  1. Rare spelling of finocchio.
    • 1766, John Mills, A New Syſtem of Practical Huſbandry, volume 4, page 194:
      The ſeeds of aſparagus, baſil, beans, beet, borage, capſicum, carrots, celeri, chervil, creſſes, endive, fennel, finocchia, hyſſop, kidney beans, lavender, leeks, lentils, marjoram, marigolds, onions, parſley, parſneps, peas, purſlain, radiſhes, ſavory, ſkirrets, ſpinnage, thyme, and turneps, are beſt ſown the firſt ſpring after they have been ſaved; and indeed many of them will not grow if they are kept longer.
    • 1826, Lady Charlotte Susan Maria Campbell Bury, Alla Giornata; or, To the Day, volume 2, page 80:
      “Hush! hush! do not be angry; you are not to be tamed any more than the torrent and the whirlwind. I have often tried to make you know what was for your good, but it is all in vain, you have never cared more for a piece of gold than for a root of finocchia.”
    • 1842, Edward Villiers Rippingille, “Il Monte di Fato (The Mountain of Fate): Wanderings of a Painter in Italy” in Bentley’s Miscellany (American edition, Joseph Mason), volume 9, ed. William Harrison Ainsworth, page 406:
      Then comes a fine old castle, with its broad walls and square towers shooting up into the sky; then high banks of tall trees, with the verdant earth seen between; lower still, gardens filled with the luxuriant and varied greens of the artichoke, the pomadore, the finocchia, arched over with shrubs and fruit-trees, and topped by tall Oriental palms in full vigour and luxuriance.
    • 1887, Good Housekeeping (Hearst Corp.), volume 5, page 302:
      There is also the stalk of the artichoke, which is allowed to grow after the heads are cut off. This is fried in batter and is called in Florence, Gobbo. Finocchia and the poorer sort of celery are cooked in the same way.
    • 1960, California Agricultural Experiment Station, Essentials of the Irrigation and Cultivation of Orchards, circular 486, page 24, §: “Florence Fennel”:
      Often called Finocchia or Sweet Anise. The bulblike enlargement at the top of the stem is eaten raw, like celery, or used for flavoring. Has a licorice flavor.
    • 1986, Monica Moran Brandies, Sprouts and Saplings: Gardening with a Difference (Strawberry Hill Press; ISBN 0894070665, 9780894070662), page 65:
      The fennel variety finocchia grows like a stalk of celery and can be eaten raw or as a boiled vegetable.