if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attributed to Harry S. Truman, coined in a July 1942 newspaper.[1]

Proverb[edit]

if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

  1. If you cannot handle the pressure, you should not remain in a position where you have to deal with it.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frederick N. Rasmussen (2013-04-25) , “Back Story: Presidents say the darnedest things”, in The Baltimore Sun[1]: “The Soda Springs Sun, an Idaho newspaper, reported in July 1942 that the phrase was a "favorite rejoinder of Senator Harry S Truman, when a member of his war contracts investigating committee objects to his strenuous pace: 'If you don't like the heat, get out of the kitchen.' "”