indigne

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: indigné

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin indīgnus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

indigne (feminine indigna, masculine and feminine plural indignes)

  1. unworthy
    • 1999, Joan Daniel Bezsonoff i Montalat, La revolta dels geperuts:
      Narbona és una metròpoli que pobleja. El barri de l'estació, indigne d'una ciutat, ronqueja.
      Narbonne is a metropolis that resembles a village. The station quarter, unworthy of a city, snores.
  2. mean, low

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin indignus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

indigne (plural indignes)

  1. unworthy
  2. disgraceful

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

indigne

  1. inflection of indigner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

indigne

  1. vocative masculine singular of indignus

References[edit]

  • indigne”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • indigne”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • indigne in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • indigne in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

indigne

  1. inflection of indignar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative