joyance

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Apparently coined by Edmund Spenser, from joy +‎ -ance.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

joyance (countable and uncountable, plural joyances)

  1. (archaic, poetic) Enjoyment, joy, delight.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book I, canto IIII, stanza XXXVII, page 55:
      So forth they marchen in this goodly fort, / To take the ſolace of the open aire, / And in freſh flowring fields themſelues to ſport; / Emongſt the reſt rode that falſe Lady faire, / The foule Dueſsa, next vnto the chaire / Of proud Lucifer’, as one of the traine: / But that good knight would not ſo nigh repaire, / Him ſelfe eſtraunging from their ioyaunce vaine, / Whoſe fellowſhip ſeemd far vnfitt for warlike ſwaine.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book I, canto XI, stanza XV, page 159:
      So dreadfully he towardes him did pas, / Forelifting vp a loft his ſpeckled breſt, / And often bounding on the bruſed gras, / As for great ioyaunce of his newcome gueſt.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book III, canto XII, stanza XVIII, page 581:
      After them went Diſpleaſure and Pleaſaunce, / He looking lompiſh and full ſullein ſad, / And hanging downe his heauy countenaunce; / She chearfull freſh and full of ioyaunce glad, / As if no ſorrow ſhe ne felt ne dread; / That euill matched paire they ſeemd to bee: / An angry Waſpe th’one in a viall had / Th’other in hers an hony-lady Bee, / Thus marched theſe ſix couples forth in faire degree
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], part II (books IV–VI), London: [] [Richard Field] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 932900760, book IIII, canto I, stanza XXXI, page 14:
      For though like withered tree, that wanteth iuyce, / She old and crooked were, yet now of late, / As freſh and fragrant as the floure deluce, / She was become, by chaunge of her eſtate, / And made full goodly ioyance to her new found mate.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], part II (books IV–VI), London: [] [Richard Field] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 932900760, book IIII, canto VIII, stanza LIX, page 125:
      There with great ioyance and with gladſome glee, / Of faire Pœana I receiued was, / And oft imbraſt, as if that I were hee, / And with kind words accoyd, vowing great loue to mee.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], part II (books IV–VI), London: [] [Richard Field] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 932900760, book IIII, canto X, stanza XXIII, page 145:
      In ſuch luxurious plentie of all pleaſure,&nbps;/ It ſeem’d a ſecond paradiſe to gheſſe, / So lauiſhly enricht with natures threaſure, / That if the happie ſoules, which doe poſſeſſe / Th’Elyſian fields, and liue in laſting bleſſe, / Should happen this with liuing eye to ſee, / They ſoone would loath their leſſer happineſſe, / And wiſh to life return’d againe to bee, / That in this ioyous place they mote haue ioyance free.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Vol. 5
      ...for excess of joyance never knew
      How went the day and how it came again.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 134:
      And on a great blooming laurel-bush the mocking-bird sang, heedless of the darkness to come, heedless of the day gone by, possessed by its fervor of music that made gloom light and all life a joyance [...].

Anagrams[edit]