push-bike

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See also: pushbike and push bike

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

push-bike (plural push-bikes)

  1. Alternative form of pushbike
    • 1919, The Motorcycle Illustrated, volume 15, New York, N.Y.: Motorcycle Publishing Company, OCLC 243881815, page 15:
      In England I learned to ride what the Australians call a push-bike, and spent many week-end leaves, and one four days' leave, riding in the South of England and Wales. [...] Today, I wished the push-bike was in its old place—especially when three boys sailed past on push-bikes and offered to give me some "gas."
    • 2004, New Statesman, volume 133, London: New Statesman Ltd., ISSN 1364-7431, OCLC 185357433, page 41, column 1:
      It wasn't long before Californian youngsters started turning out customised push-bikes, mimicking the grown-up motorbikes in the fast lane. The fad of bicycle polo spawned a push-bike with a big fat seat, which became a backyard classic.

Verb[edit]

push-bike (third-person singular simple present push-bikes, present participle push-biking, simple past and past participle push-biked)

  1. Alternative form of pushbike
    • 1913, Surveyor, volume 43, London: [Taylor & Francis?], OCLC 867654985, page 1001, column 2:
      It makes me miserable when I think of the number of poor surveyors still push-biking their daily round.
    • 1932, Herbert N. Smith, “English Personalities”, in Year Book of Optometry, New York, N.Y.: New York State Optometric Association, OCLC 9604920, page 249:
      Dr. Smith is making a tour of the world "push-biking" from place to place, forwarding whatever he finds interesting along his travels.
    • 1994, Kingsley Amis, You Can’t Do Both, London: Hutchinson, →ISBN; republished London: Vintage Books, 2004, →ISBN, page 318:
      Apart from a wireless-repair van parked a few yards off and a vicar's-wife type, energetically push-biking past in bright yellow oilskins, the streets were deserted.
    • 1996, Paul [J.] Marriott; Yvonne Argent, The Last Days of T. E. Lawrence: A Leaf in the Wind, Brighton, East Sussex; Portland, Or.: Alpha Press, →ISBN, page 64:
      It was cloudy, cool and misty as he [Thomas Edward Lawrence] push-biked up the long hill into Elsfield village.