sagart

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Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish sacart, from Latin sacerdōs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sagart m (genitive singular sagairt, nominative plural sagairt)

  1. priest
    • 1939, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”, printed in Marie-Louise Sjoestedt, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Bibliothèque de l'École des Hautes Études 270. Paris: Librairie Honoré Champion, p. 197:
      Chuaidh sí go dtí uncail di a bhí i n‑a shagart san bhaile mhór agus fuair sí uaidh sórt éide agus giúrléidí beaga éigin eile.
      She went to an uncle of hers who was a priest in the city and from him she got a variety of vestments and some other small accessories.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sagart shagart
after an, tsagart
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish sacart, from Latin sacerdōs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

sagart m (genitive singular sagairt, plural sagartan or sagairtean)

  1. (Christianity) chaplain, priest
  2. (Lewis) ram with one of its testicles wanting

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
sagart shagart
after "an", t-sagart
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • sagart” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “sacart”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language