theos

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See also: Theos and þeos

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek θεός (theós, god, noun).

Pronunciation[edit]

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈtʰe.os/, [ˈt̪ʰe.ɔs]

Noun[edit]

theos m

  1. (religion) god or deity
    • 1510, [s.n.], De Placitis philosophorum libri, [s.l.], OCLC 165843068, page [unpaged]:
      [] luná luminis nobis authores esse:ab eo quod theasthe id est spectare dicunt:& thin.idest currere:theos (unde nos deos) appellauerunt.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1576, Altenstaig, Johann, Lexicon theologicum : complectens vocabulorum descriptiones, diffinitiones & interpretationes, Antverpiae: Beller, OCLC 633781092, page 210 [facing page]:
      Multiuoca dicuntur illa (vt inquit Hugo) quæ sub multiplicatione vocum important vnam & eandem rem om nino, vt Theos Deus, omnia talia sunt synonyma in diuinis.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:theos.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • "Theos", in Ambrogio Calepino, Dictionarium copiosissimus, Parisii, 1517, unpaged. →OCLC.
  • "Theos", in Bartolomeo Castelli, Lexicon medicum graeco-latinum, Norimberga, 1682, p. 1132. →OCLC.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Determiner[edit]

theos

  1. Alternative spelling of þeos (these)

Pronoun[edit]

theos

  1. Alternative spelling of þeos (these)

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

theos

  1. Alternative spelling of þeos (this)

Pronoun[edit]

theos

  1. Alternative spelling of þeos (this)

Etymology 3[edit]

Determiner[edit]

theos

  1. Alternative spelling of þeos (the, that, this)