Ciceronian

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin Cicerōniānus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Ciceronian (comparative more Ciceronian, superlative most Ciceronian)

  1. Of, or relating to Marcus Tullius Cicero, or the ideas in his philosophical treatises.
  2. (rhetoric) Eloquent, resembling Cicero’s style.
    • 1885, John Ormsby, Don Quixote, volume 2, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes, chapter XXXII:
      "But why should I attempt to depict and describe in detail, and feature by feature, the beauty of the peerless Dulcinea, the burden being one worthy of other shoulders than mine, an enterprise wherein the pencils of Parrhasius, Timantes, and Apelles, and the graver of Lysippus ought to be employed, to paint it in pictures and carve it in marble and bronze, and Ciceronian and Demosthenian eloquence to sound its praises?" ¶ "What does Demosthenian mean, Senor Don Quixote?" said the duchess; "it is a word I never heard in all my life." ¶ "Demosthenian eloquence," said Don Quixote, "means the eloquence of Demosthenes, as Ciceronian means that of Cicero, who were the two most eloquent orators in the world."
  3. (rhetoric) With effusive use of antithesis and long sentences.

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