Crimea

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: crimea

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Map of Crimea (the Crimean peninsula).
The Crimean Khanate in 1600.

Etymology[edit]

Via Italian from Crimean Tatar Qırım.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Crimea

  1. A peninsula which juts southwards out of the Ukrainian mainland (to which it is connected by the Isthmus of Perekop) into the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Any of several political entities which have claimed the peninsula, such as:
    1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean ulus of the Golden Horde.
    2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Taurida Oblast.
    3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Taurida Governorate.
    4. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean People’s Republic.
    5. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Taurida Soviet Socialist Republic.
    6. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The first or second Crimean Regional Government.
    7. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean Socialist Soviet Republic.
    8. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean ASSR of the Russian SFSR (1921–1945).
    9. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Teilbezirk Taurien of the Reichskommissariat Ukraine.
    10. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean Oblast which formed part of the Russian SFSR from 1945–1954 and part of the Ukrainian SSR from 1954–1991, whereafter it briefly became an ASSR (the Crimean ASSR).
    11. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Autonomous Republic of Crimea with Ukraine (1992–present).
    12. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Republic of Crimea, proclaimed and annexed by Russia, but not internationally recognized, since March of 2014.
    13. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) The Crimean Federal District, including the Republic of Crimea and city of Sevastopol, proclaimed and annexed by Russia, but not internationally recognized, since March of 2014.
  3. The Crimean Khanate, which for much of its history controlled most of the Crimean peninsula and various adjacent areas of the mainland.
    • 1987, Robert M. Croskey, Muscovite Diplomatic Practice in the Reign of Ivan III, page 96:
      According to Zimin, this individual was in the service of Prince Fedor Vasili'evich Riazanskii as early as 1498, two years after his service on the embassy to the Crimea.
    • 1995, Muscovy and Sweden in the Thirty Years' War 1630-1635 (ISBN 0521451396), page 73
      On its return journey in 1633 the Tatar embassy was arrested by the Muscovite government, which was already at war with the Crimea, and only after several months was it released as a result of an appeal by Sweden[.]
    • 2004, Andreas Kappeler, Die Geschichte Russlands im 16. und 17. Jahrhundert (ISBN 3447050292), page 371
      As late as 1665, the Crimea's demand for continued and increased tribue from Moscow was one of the conditions leading to a peace treaty between a khan and tsar („kaznu v Krym prodolzhat' prisylat' s pribyl'iu“). Notwithstanding Moscow's rhetorical exercises, the Russian government was acutely aware that as long as Russia's military force remained ineffective against the Crimea, peace with Crimea could only be purchased.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see the citations page.

Usage notes[edit]

Often with the article: the Crimea.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Proper noun[edit]

Crimea f

  1. Crimea

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Proper noun[edit]

Crimea f

  1. Crimea

Derived terms[edit]