Croesus

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See also: Crœsus

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Κροῖσος (Kroîsos)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

Croesus

  1. (historical) A male given name.
  2. (specifically) A king of Lydia, noted for his great wealth.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably.” And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.

Noun[edit]

Croesus (plural Croesuses or Croesi)

  1. (figuratively) A rich person.
    • 1875, Henry James, "Benvolio" in The Galaxy 20 (2) (August 1875).
      "Decidedly he was to be a great man, and this was not the moment for letting him go! At the same time there was something impressive in this extraordinary lapse in his eagerness—in his finding it so easy to forget his honors. It was only an intellectual Croesus, the Countess said to herself, who could afford to keep so loose an account."

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Κροῖσος (Kroîsos)

Proper noun[edit]

Croesus m (genitive Croesī); second declension

  1. Croesus (a king of Lydia)
  2. a rich man

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative Croesus Croesī
genitive Croesī Croesōrum
dative Croesō Croesīs
accusative Croesum Croesōs
ablative Croesō Croesīs
vocative Croese Croesī

References[edit]

  • Croesus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.