Schacht

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See also: schacht

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German schacht, from Old Saxon skaft, from Proto-Germanic *skaftaz. The variant form Schaft derives from the same Germanic source, forming a doublet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Schacht m (genitive Schachts or Schachtes, plural Schächte)

  1. shaft, mineshaft (tunnel)

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German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German, from Old Saxon skaft, from Proto-Germanic *skaftaz. Cognate with English shaft, Swedish skaft and German Schaft. The sense "beating" is from the canes which were used to beat misbehaving pupils in 19th-century schools.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (northern German Low German) IPA(key): [ʃaxt]
  • (Westphalia, Eastphalia, eastern Frisia) IPA(key): [skaxt]
  • (Westphalia) IPA(key): [sxaxt]

Noun[edit]

Schacht m

  1. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian) a shaft, a pole to which something is attached
    1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) a stalk (e.g. a beanstalk)
  2. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) a cane, a stick
  3. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian, by extension, used without article) a beating
    Ik hebbe Schacht kręgen.
    I have been beaten. (literally: I have gotten [the] shaft.)
  4. (in several dialects) a shaft, a tunnel driven vertically into the ground
  5. (in several dialects, including Low Prussian) a bootleg, the part of a boot which covers the shin and calf

Synonyms[edit]

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