Talk:wait up

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RFD 2014[edit]

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The following information passed a request for deletion.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


wait up

Rfd-sense "To stay awake waiting for somebody to return." It is SOP wait + up (awake). --WikiTiki89 01:30, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

  • Keep, clearly a set phrase. bd2412 T 03:14, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
    In what way is it a set phrase? You get "be up all night", "stay up all night", "sit up all night", "wait up all night", etc. --WikiTiki89 03:19, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
Keep.
Cambridge definition: "to not go to bed at night because you are expecting someone to arrive"
Macmillan definition: "to not go to sleep until someone comes home"
Collins definition: "if you wait up, you deliberately do not go to bed, especially because you are expecting someone to return home late at night"
+ another sense at Collins: American spoken "used for asking or telling someone to stop so that you can speak to them or walk with them"
I see it as almost a equivalent of Russian дожидаться/дождаться as opposed to ждать/подождать, ожидать (to wait) a variation of "wait". --Anatoli (обсудить/вклад) 03:49, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
Note that it's only the "stay awake" sense that's up for RFD. Russian дожидаться/дождаться may sometimes imply being awake, but it's not part of their meaning. In this case, the word "up" can be an adverb meaning "awake", in which case the phrase is SOP, or the word "up" can be part of a phrasal verb, which is definition number 1 and is not being RFD'd. --WikiTiki89 03:57, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

After looking into it some more, I think I'm ok with keeping it (I'm withdrawing the request). I was biased due to never having heard it used that way before and it just sounded odd to me. --WikiTiki89 04:06, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

  • I immediately thought of the use that is well-defined by Collins: American spoken "used for asking or telling someone to stop so that you can speak to them or walk with them"
We should have that. DCDuring TALK 05:25, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
We do. --WikiTiki89 05:57, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Kept. RFD withdrawn. — TAKASUGI Shinji (talk) 10:56, 18 February 2014 (UTC)