Talk:waterfall

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I highly doubt the supposed german translation "Elchurin". As a native speaker i have never heard of it and some googling seems to give more hints to it being a swedish chewing tobacco product or something, even though there are also some sites talking about it being german for "source" / Quelle... Mutante 18:21, 30 September 2007 (UTC)

The person who added it vandalized other translation sections. Cynewulf 18:32, 30 September 2007 (UTC)

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Second sense (tagged, not listed.) While it may have this meaning in other languages, it doesn't in English; one must say "a waterfall of ..." to convey a meaning other than for water. --Connel MacKenzie 08:23, 3 March 2008 (UTC)

Also the verb sense could stand some citations. All I could find on b.g.c were cites related to mining engineering. DCDuring TALK 15:07, 3 March 2008 (UTC)
Well, definition #1 certainly doesn't cover uses of "a waterfall of ___". Perhaps some reworking is in order, though? —RuakhTALK 02:30, 4 March 2008 (UTC)
The person that tagged it originally, probably hoped for a rewrite. I agree with the sentiment. A waterfall doesn't have to be permanent either (even though most are constant.) Any liquid (not just water) can make a waterfall in English. "The bottle tipped over, sending a waterfall of soda off the counter." The verb seems to be clearly in widespread use, with immediately available cites going back almost a century. --Connel MacKenzie 08:19, 5 September 2008 (UTC)