beway

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From by way equivalent to be- +‎ way. Compare German wegen (because of, by reason of).

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

beway

  1. (dialectal, Ireland, Scotland, US) By way; because.
    • 1832, the mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction:
      [...] an' then hee'l turn him roon behint-afore an' play treeks, till collie gems at him; an' then beway o' makin friens again, hee'l Btreek an' pat him, [...]
    • 1857, Celtic Union:
      Be gannies," suggested Larry, " I think the best way would be for the three iv us to give the artichokes at the fire below, a warm reception beway iv a do sure, an' it'll soften the bargain wid ould Hardrade."
    • 1864, John Fullarton, Historical memoir of the family of Eglinton and Winton:
      [...] is waistit and destroyit be divers personis that slais the dere and cunyngis thairof, and pasturis bestis thereintill masterfully beway of dede, [...]
    • 1951, American Classical League:
      This young man afterwards became a member of Parliament from Scotland, and was for many years Grand Master of the [...] that week into as good English as he can and write it beway of version, being allowed to paraphrase it in his own way, [...]
    • 2009, Bob Curran, Celtic Lore & Legend:
      Wan was in front, beway he was the ginral, walkin' wid his chin up, proud as a paycock.

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps from the phrase "by the way(side)", equivalent to by +‎ way.

Noun[edit]

beway (plural beways)

  1. (rare) Movement; sway; influence.
    • 1962, Indian National Congress. All India Congress Committee, Congress election souvenir:
      The Third Five-Year Plan with an industrial bias will no doubt, help the State of Kerala to make adequate beway in the matter of industrialisation which alone can pull up educated sons of India from their present low economic level.
    • 1988, Qamar-ud-Din Khan, H. M. Arshad Qureshi, Political concepts in Sunnah:
      It was further extended and the whole of Hijaz came under the beway of the Prophet in A.H. 8 when Makkah was conquered until this time there was hardly any administration, [...]
    • 1991, Sanjeev Prasad Srivastava, Art and cultural heritage of Patiala:
      It goes without saying that when Lahore and Delhi Darbars were losing their royal glamour of art and culture, Patiala showed the beway in the whole of cis-Sutlej region.
  2. (rare) Movement away; loss.
    • 1949, Jagadiswarananda (Swami.), Girish Ghose and his dramas:
      But their greatness admitted, it had been pointed out again, and with pe[r]sistence, that Bengali drama had not progressed in any measure, and that there was too much of a beway to make up.
    • 1966, Virendra Kumar, Committees and Commissions in India:
      It is obvious from these figures that the tribals are educationally very backward and that special educational programmes will have to be undertaken for some considerable time to make up the beway.
    • 1966, Raghuraj Singh, Ishwar Chand Singhal, Labour problems:
      There is a considerable beway to be made up in the provision of housing accommodation to workers.
    • 1970, Orissa (India). Education Dept, The Orissa education magazine:
      In the Fourth 5 year Plan special efforts are to be made to make up the beway in the field of girls' education.
    • 1993, M. Gangadhara Rao, Odeyar D. Heggade And P.S. Yadapadithaya, Industrial Labour: Emerging Trends:
      Thirdly, the absence of a strong and solid trade union movement which may secure to the workers their proper share in the gains of economic progress and which may also make for past beway in their standard of living makes it all the more incumbent upon the state [...]