croak

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *croken, crouken, (also represented by craken > crake), back-formation from Old English crācettan (to croak) (also in derivative crǣcettung (croaking)), from Proto-Germanic *krāk- (compare Swedish kråka, German krächzen), from Proto-Indo-European *greh₂-k- (compare Latin grāculus ‘jackdaw’, Serbo-Croatian grákati).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

croak (plural croaks)

  1. A faint, harsh sound made in the throat.
  2. The cry of a frog or toad. (see also ribbit)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

croak (third-person singular simple present croaks, present participle croaking, simple past and past participle croaked)

  1. (intransitive) To make a croak.
  2. (transitive) To utter in a low, hoarse voice.
    • Shakespeare
      The raven himself is hoarse, / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan.
  3. (intransitive, of a frog) To make its cry.
  4. (intransitive, of a raven) To make its cry.
  5. (slang) To die.
  6. (transitive, slang) To kill someone or something.
    He'd seen my face, so I had to croak him.
  7. To complain; especially, to grumble; to forebode evil; to utter complaints or forebodings habitually.
    • Carlyle
      Marat [] croaks with reasonableness.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.