distaste

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

distaste (uncountable)

  1. A feeling of dislike, aversion or antipathy.
  2. (obsolete) Aversion of the taste; dislike, as of food or drink; disrelish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) Discomfort; uneasiness.
    • Francis Bacon
      Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comforts and hopes.
  4. Alienation of affection; displeasure; anger.
    • Milton
      On the part of Heaven, / Now alienated, distance and distaste.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

distaste (third-person singular simple present distastes, present participle distasting, simple past and past participle distasted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To dislike.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida, Act II, Scene 2.
      Although my will distaste what it elected
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, II.4.1.i:
      the Romans distasted them so much, that they were often banished out of their city, as Pliny and Celsus relate, for 600 yeers not admitted.
  2. (intransitive) to be distasteful; to taste bad
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To offend; to disgust; to displease.
    • Sir J. Davies
      He thought it no policy to distaste the English or Irish by a course of reformation, but sought to please them.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To deprive of taste or relish; to make unsavory or distasteful.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drayton to this entry?)

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

distaste

  1. second-person plural past historic of distare
  2. second-person plural imperfect subjunctive of distare

Anagrams[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

distaste

  1. Informal second-person singular () preterite indicative form of distar.