lark

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See also: Lark

English[edit]

A Crested lark, of the Alaudidae family

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English larke, laverke, from Old English lāwerce, lǣwerce, lāuricæ, from Proto-Germanic *laiwazikǭ (compare dialectal West Frisian larts, Dutch leeuwerik, German Lerche), from *laiwaz (borrowed into Finnish leivo, Estonian lõo), of unknown ultimate origin with no known cognates outside of Germanic.

Noun[edit]

lark (plural larks)

  1. Any of various small, singing passerine birds of the family Alaudidae.
  2. Any of various similar-appearing birds, but usually ground-living, such as the meadowlark and titlark.
  3. One who wakes early; one who is up with the larks.
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Verb[edit]

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To catch larks.
    to go larking

External links[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain, either

  • from a northern English dialectal term lake/laik (to play) (around 1300, from Old Norse leika (to play (as opposed to work))), with an intrusive -r- as is common in southern British dialects; or
  • a shortening of skylark (1809), sailors' slang, "play roughly in the rigging of a ship", because the common European larks were proverbial for high-flying; Dutch has a similar idea in speelvogel (playbird, a person of markedly playful nature).

Noun[edit]

lark (plural larks)

  1. A romp, frolic, some fun.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Dickens to this entry?)
  2. A prank.
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Verb[edit]

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To sport, engage in harmless pranking.
  2. To frolic, engage in carefree adventure.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  • lark” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams[edit]